THRILLS

Wednesday February 23 Picture this: The Colorado History Museum has just the thing for all you Colorado history buffs: an ongoing Western Authors Lecture Series focusing on books detailing life as it progressed in our little corner of the world. Tonight's 7 p.m. lecture puts William and Elizabeth Jones on the podium for a slide show taken from their photographic collection, William Henry Jackson's Colorado, a coffee-table tome recording the works of a master cameraman of the new frontier. For information and reservations call the museum, 1300 Broadway, 866-4686.

Thursday February 24 What goes up: In this case, it ain't comin' down--and nobody knows it better than the folks at the Breckenridge Brewery, nestled in that land of opportunity at the doorstep of the Coors Field construction site. They're so excited about it, in fact, that they've been hosting a monthly Coors Field Update, an informational happy hour featuring speakers in the know. Tonight's guest is Robin Hackett, who will talk about the stadium decking. Anyone who's spent a heady moment contemplating that burgeoning hole in LoDo's ground will enjoy this mixture of anticipation, munchies and Colorado brews, taking place at 5:30 p.m. The brewery is located at 2220 Blake; for details call 297-3644.

Friday February 25 Resting on your laureates: You don't get to be Colorado Poet Laureate until you've become truly beloved. And in case you have any doubts about why the late Thomas Hornsby Ferril was so awarded, the Denver Press Club, 1330 Glenarm Pl., is sponsoring Friends of Ferril, an all-star birthday celebration and reading of Ferril's works starting tonight at 8. On hand will be a literary lot including former Colorado first lady Dottie Lamm, actress June Favre, Tom Auer of the Bloomsbury Review (who will be doing double duty by bartending as well as reciting) and others. Admission is $3, with proceeds benefiting the local poetry calendar Poesis. Call 733-8561.

High and low: Moving pictures come in all shapes and sizes--a fact put into perspective by two very different film events taking place tonight. Eye for an I Cinema--a brave Boulder venue showcasing independent Colorado film and video makers--celebrates its first anniversary with an 8 p.m. screening of various short works highlighted by the state premiere of Athens, Georgia 1993, a visiting AIDS documentary filmed by Jim McKay and REM's Michael Stipe. Catch Eye for an I at the Forum Room, located in the CU-Boulder UMC; admission is $5. Meanwhile, over at Coors Auditorium, 12th and Ford St. in Golden, REI outdoor stores will host a 6:30 p.m. best-of showing culled from the Banff Festival of Mountain Films, held in Alberta, Canada, every year. Outdoor adventure is the king of this fest, featuring an array of films about rugged derring-do in exotic locales--from the Great Tango Tower in Pakistan to the Empire State Building in New York City. Tickets, available at REI stores, are $10 ($12 day of show); call 756-3928. And don't worry: Both programs will be repeated--same time, same place--tomorrow.

From the fertile crescent: When James Brown said, "I like a man who sweats!" he was talking about Spencer Bohren, a New Orleans-style blues guitarist who relies on vintage instruments and Delta rhythms to put his message across. Bohren gets down to business tonight at 8 at a favorite roost, the Swallow Hill Music Hall, at 1905 S. Pearl St.; the Louisiana-inflected Alleygators open. For tickets, $10 ($8 members), call 777-1003.

Saturday February 26 Winging it: It's a natural progression--if you love opera, you love Puccini's Madama Butterfly, simply one of the most popular lyric works ever to face a proscenium. Opera Colorado opens its season with a version of the crowd-pleaser featuring the talents of soprano Elizabeth Holleque--fresh from her television debut on Live From Lincoln Center: Pavarotti Plus!--in the tragic role of Cio-Cio-San. Remaining tickets to tonight's performance, starting at 8 in the Buell Theatre, 13th and Curtis St., are $76; tickets ranging between $47 and $116 are still available for March 1 and 4. Call 986-8742.

Bustin' out all over: Some supergroups don't live up to the hype, and others just never do gel, but the ones that form for the hell of it seem to come out on top, even if it is just for fun. Just consider The Blues Busters--a good-time aggregation featuring Little Feat guitarist Paul Barrere, Dixie Dregs keyboard genius T. Lavitz, Bonnie Raitt bassist Freebo, drummer Larry Zack and Detroit blues artist Catfish Hodge--and you'll get a good feel for what makes a supergroup work. You get two chances to see them--tonight at Herman's Hideaway, 1578 S. Broadway, and tomorrow at the Fox, 1135 13th St. in Boulder. Just call 290-TIXS and they'll set you up.

Sunday February 27 Tune town: National Public Radio's E-Town brings back an old favorite tonight: Richard Thompson, Britain's wise and wizened poet, magnificent guitarist and comic observer--and in the world of folk-derived music, it just doesn't get much better than that. Thompson drops by the 7 p.m. public taping with material from his new album, Mirror Blue--and we can only hope he'll pull a few of the classics out of his hat as well. It all takes place at the newly reopened Boulder Theater, 2030 14th St. in Boulder; to purchase tickets, $6 in advance ($8 day of show), call 449-0909 or 447-0159.

A Legg up: Adventure is where you find it. For intelligent fingerpicker Adrian Legg--yet another fine guitar player in the area this week--it's found in the expansive exploration of his instrument. Using tunings borrowed from bluegrass banjos and an elegant, almost classical technique, he fluidly mixes influences into his tunes--you'll hear a Celtic lilt, as well as intimations of country and pop. Legg headlines tonight at 9:30 at Herman's; call 777-5840 for tickets and information.

Monday February 28 You are there: The Denver Museum of Natural History will play host to the rainforests and reefs of Belize, all made possible via The Jason Project, a series of live satellite broadcasts--recording the activities of explorers, scientists and archaeologists--beginning today and continuing between 9 a.m. and 2:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday, until March 12. One of only 25 such broadcasting sites in the U.S., Canada and Great Britain, the museum will present the transmissions to visitors on three giant screens, as well as on a number of miniscreens designed to resemble a research ship control panel. A separate admission of $2.50 (students) or $3.75 (adults), not included in the general museum fee, is required. For information call the museum, 2001 Colorado Blvd., 370-6314; call 322-7009 for reservations.

Tuesday March 1 This team is bound for glory: Whether you are a novice at running marathons or not, if you've decided to run, you're going to need help. One place to find it is in the Leukemia Society of America's Team in Training program. Runners of all abilities raising contributions for leukemia research and patient aid will be eligible to train for the July 31 San Francisco Marathon with expert coaches. Depending on the amount raised, participants will be eligible for further dividends--from team clothing by Pearl Izumi to round-trip airfare and hotel accommodations. A distance of 26.2 miles sounds like a drop in the bucket when you consider all that. Those interested can attend an informational meeting tonight at 6:30 at Govnr's Park Restaurant, 6th Ave. and Logan St. For details, give Team in Training a buzz at 293-8300. Of love and shadows: CU-Boulder plays host tonight when Chilean magic realist Isabel Allende comes to town. The best-selling author and niece of the late president of Chile, Salvador Allende, will speak about a subject she knows quite well--her talk is called House of Spirits: South American Writing, sure to evoke numerous magical moments. Allende speaks at 7:30 p.m. in Macky Auditorium on the Boulder campus; tickets are $6 ($2 students). Call 492-3228 for information.

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