MELTING DOWN

TWO ROCKY FLATS WATCHDOG GROUPS BLOW UP AT EACH OTHER.

Ken Korkia, who worked for four years as the Cleanup Commission's technical assistant before joining CAB last summer, notes that his new organization's staff "has only been together since June," while the board has been forced to "spend a lot of time organizing, writing bylaws and deciding priorities." Korkia says he made the shift because he believed the Cleanup Commission's comparatively skimpy budget was making it difficult to get things done. "To me, it was a matter of job security," he says. "I wanted to continue working on Rocky Flats issues, and the Cleanup Commission was running out of money."

The Commission must reapply for another grant from EPA this fall. "I can't say whether they'll get their money or not," says Robin Coursen of EPA's Denver office. "That gets decided in Washington."

And Stone says he'd rather deal with budget woes than move over to CAB. "We don't want to be associated with a government entity that might want to control us," says the engineer. "We want to be entirely independent.

"Groups come and go, but the problems at Rocky Flats are still there," adds Stone. "That's why we're still here.

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