Letters

Rush to Judgement
Regarding Patricia Calhoun's August 21 column, "Once Upon a Mattress":
KOA should fire Keith Weinman. The only reason to listen to any Jacor station is to hear Rush.

Don L. Lewis
Aurora

It's very appropriate that in last week's letters column, Mike Cooper compared Keith Weinman to "the missing link." Until men learn not to beat women, evolution has a long way to go.

Joy Frick
Boulder

Put That in Your Pipeline and Smoke It
I guess it was a slow news week that led to Ward Harkavy's "Pipeline to Palestine," in the August 14 issue. Reading this article, I didn't know what exactly I was supposed to feel--admiration? The fact is that these guns and ammo ended up killing and injuring untold numbers of civilians and soldiers. Gee, what's next? A Congressional Medal?

This story belonged in the National Review, not Westword.
Victor D. Padilla
Aurora

Are we supposed to admire Sam Sterling for running guns to Palestine in the late 1940s? "Jews carrying one-pound bricks of TNT would run up to Arab houses, jam short fuses into the bricks, light them, hurl them through a window, and run like hell," you say. If this appeared in an article about Bosnia, one would assume it was an example of the evil acts of vicious people. To Sam Sterling, though, a man who made such acts possible, it was merely "necessary." Sure, innocent Arabs had to be murdered in their homes, but at least "it was historically Jewish land," says Sterling--although is that a hint of guilt peeking through when he continues by saying, "if one could make that claim after 2,000 years"?

Of course, the only way to enforce such obscure claims is through murder, as no useful piece of land has remained empty for 2,000 years. In any case, the claim would be spurious even if claims from antiquity were valid. Many Israeli Jews, perhaps most, are not descended from inhabitants of the Holy Land. Many European Jews are descended from Asian tribes that were converted to Judaism, for instance, and black Ethiopian Jews are quite obviously not Semitic.

In order to build a new country in Palestine, the people who had lived there for generations had to be either subdued or removed, a process we now call ethnic cleansing. Sam Sterling is as guilty as the Yugoslavian Serbs who assisted in the cleansing of Bosnia. As the son of a Jewish survivor of the Holocaust who decided not to go to Israel, I believe that two wrongs do not make a right; the murder and displacement of thousands of Palestinians does not somehow make amends for the Holocaust, and the claim that it was necessary to create a safe place for Jews to live seems ridiculous--are Jews really safe in today's Israel?

Peter Kent
via the Internet

Good Book, Chapter and Verse
I would like to make a few comments regarding Ward Harkavy's August 14 article, "King James's Version." Most Christians refuse to realize that the belief system they adhere to is more allied to a kind of liberal humanism than to the worship of that vengeful god Jehovah--a god who advocates genocide, rape, murder and slavery in his name.

They feel that the figure known as Jesus (the Christ), the son of this god, is exempt from these politically incorrect ideas, despite the fact that not only does he descend physically from King David (a murderer, liar and adulterer) but is also supposedly the incarnation or mouthpiece of said deity.

Religions fashioned by human hands as they are tend to reflect attempts at social engineering by their human creators rather than any spiritual influence by a supernatural "creator." Some religions prohibit the consumption of pork. This most likely originates from a health risk present at the time these texts were purported to have been written.

Also, at this time women were considered the property of men. Changing the wording of the Bible is another attempt at social engineering akin to the Klan saying "We're the new Klan, not the old Klan" to reflect the moral climate. The motives for these changes are painfully transparent.

Michael Todd
Denver

Take a Lode Off
Stuart Steers's article on Summo Mineral Corporation's recent encounter with the National Wildlife Federation ("Lode Warriors," August 7) makes prominent reference to the fact that, instead of copper, the company ran into a "rich lode of environmentalists." The article should have read, "a load of rich environmentalists."

Far from the warm, fuzzy image portrayed on wildlife calendars, groups such as the National Wildlife Federation are big business--a business that provides much in the way of employment for lawyers and litigators. With an annual budget of more than $97 million, a number that is much higher than the budgets of most industry associations, the organization packs considerable economic wallop when it comes to dishing out trouble for legitimate businesses whose only sin is the desire to conduct responsible mineral extraction and reclamation activities, hopefully at a profit, on lands where such activity is permissible under applicable law.

The NWF must continue to find "villains" in order to survive. Yet we in industry question whether a case against a responsible operator like Summo serves any legitimate environmental purpose or is simply part of a well-orchestrated campaign against mining in the West.

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