Top

news

Stories

 

The Broad Was a Fraud

As con or cover girl, Storme's career had legs.

At last, Storme had been caught with his pants down.

The Broad Was a Fraud

In April, Fourth Judicial District Judge Ed Colt determined that there was enough evidence to bring Storme Shannon Aerison to trial on charges of fraud and theft. If convicted, he could get twelve years in prison. But despite his two-page rap sheet, since none of the charges have been for violent crimes, it's likely that he'll get more probation and more counseling. Besides, some law enforcement authorities worry about what could happen to a cover girl behind bars.

Storme weather: Charles Daugherty in costume on Kenny Castle's bike; at the prom; and as a high school cheerleader.
Storme weather: Charles Daugherty in costume on Kenny Castle's bike; at the prom; and as a high school cheerleader.
Storme weather: Charles Daugherty in costume on Kenny Castle's bike.
Storme weather: Charles Daugherty in costume on Kenny Castle's bike.

Storme has not yet entered a plea; his next hearing is set for June 26.

At Storme's tidy, two-story home in southeast Colorado Springs, four cars sit in the driveway, and a front-porch light burns late into Sunday morning. No one answers the bell. Storme does not answer a note left in the mailbox. Storme's public defender does not return phone calls; the cop who's dealt with him the longest, Sergeant Robert Driscoll, doesn't want to talk about Storme and bring him any more press attention.

At another tidy home a few miles away from Storme's, Leo Daugherty Jr. comes to the door and says, "Sorry, I have nothing to say."

Storme's dupes, however, still have plenty to say. "You can't knock the guy for his ability to come off as a woman," Ferguson says. "You could knock the fact that he's a complete and total asshole, but he is good at what he does. And if he wants to be a girl, fine. Go down to Trinidad. But stop messing with people's minds. Some people had really tough times over this."

What bothers Ferguson most is that Storme preys upon people's willingness to trust -- and does so without a hint of remorse. Ferguson had called the police after he learned about Storme's Puerto Rico ruse and later confronted Storme at police headquarters. But Storme didn't apologize or offer excuses. In fact, Storme didn't say much of anything.

And so, people continue to wonder about Storme. They wonder not just why so many people fall for the charade, but whether Storme, too, is so deep into the fantasy that he also believes it -- and why none of his longtime Dreamteam members does anything to discourage it. In fact, Amundson suggests, some of the crew might be contributing to Storme's delusions -- and benefiting from them.

When he appeared before the judge in April, Storme asked permission to travel out of the country this month in order to complete his scheduled fashion-calendar shoot. The judge refused.

Yet on Storme's Web site, the Millennium Tour continues. And there, with water sparkling in the background, blue eyes shimmering and blond hair spilling onto her shoulders, Storme Shannon Aerison smiles for the camera.

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
All
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 
Loading...