Letters to the Editor

From the week of October 26, 2000

Dying to Believe

The doctor is in: I'd like to comment on Eileen Welsome's October 12 article about the First Born Church, "Born to Die."

There's a joke that goes like this: A city is being flooded, so a man climbs a tree and starts praying to God. Another man passes him in a boat, offering a ride to a safe place, but the man refuses. Fifteen minutes later the same thing happens -- there's a family in the passing boat offering help. That's repeated several times before the man drowns. After his death, he meets God and asks him why He didn't save him: "I prayed to you and believed in you, and you still didn't help me," the man says. To which God replies: "Well, how many boats could I possibly send you?"

The same thing happens with those people who absolutely refuse to seek medical help. Instead, they sit around and pray and wait for a miracle, when their miracle lies in a visit to a doctor.

Alissa Seversky
Aurora


School Daze

Assault on common sense: Julie Jargon's "Telling Tales Out of School," in the October 19 issue, both perplexed and angered me. Now, I know that special-needs children will have a hard time dealing with their sexuality, but I am deeply saddened at something that I think we should all look at as a simple fact: There was one sexual assault on a school bus and another in a school hallway. Where are people safe?

Looking deeper, I can't say we need a fascist type of security system in schools that always monitors students, but, frankly, the behavior of the bus driver is unacceptable. The fact that these individuals are retarded breaks my heart, because these assaults are bound to confuse them even more. The fact that the boy in question had spent time in strip clubs and whatnot doesn't excuse this behavior, just because he had seen women "bought" before. The final person at fault on my list is the principal, who dodged the meetings and threatened suspension. What kind of way to handle this situation was that? Yes, it makes us all squirm in our seats, but if we ignore it, it will happen again. I just hope this poor individual can heal from this. It is inhumane, and with her disability, what if she somehow thinks it's her fault? Because it isn't! I trust her mother has the nurturing ability to help her heal from this.

I haven't read anything that made me this angry for a while. Let's monitor the public school system with even more of a "watchdog" attitude than before, because impressions are made in seconds. Under no circumstances should there be any red tape involved after an assault. I am appalled at all of the parties -- except, of course, the victim and her mother. We hate to see confirmation that our judicial and executive branches and politicians in general are going to hell in a handbasket, and then something like this happens. It requires that every one of us point a finger somewhere. Let's turn up the heat on tolerance of assault before we find one of our loved ones left in the cold.

Jon Weirman
Denver


No Justice

Body of evidence: After reading Juliet Wittman's "Justice, Boulder Style," in the October 19 issue, this is maybe a long shot. But has anyone, perhaps Steve Thomas, wondered if Mindhunter, by John Douglas, was taken in as evidence in this crime? I have read the book, and while I tried so hard not to read into it and the investigation, it was really hard not to find some parallels. Check it out -- I think you'll see what I mean, especially the "listen carefully" part; there is mention of it in a crime discussed in the book. One of the Ramseys was reading this book when JonBenét was murdered.

L. Mulaly
via the Internet

Fluff and nonsense: Juliet Wittman's "Justice, Boulder Style," about ex-detective Steve Thomas, misrepresented facts surrounding the Ramsey case, including the truth of what took place between me and Vassar professor Donald Foster. I was really not surprised: Thomas had played that game of twisting facts when he wrote his book. It seems this female reporter was doing a fluff-and-puff piece on Steve and forgot that reporters are supposed to look just a bit beyond. She missed a good story; what she wrote was pathetic in comparison to what she could have done.

Sadly, I was not surprised to find that, once again, a reporter didn't make any effort to contact me and find out that Thomas had misrepresented the "Foster file," didn't ask if Foster had just incorrectly thought I was John Andrew. It was much more than that, much more. She didn't say why Don Foster's "evidence" was not accepted, or why he never was, and never could be, the solution to this mystery.

I would caution readers that when a reporter is engaged in stroking a person to get an interview to fill up space in a paper, a lot of what the reader gets may be totally unrelated to the truth.

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