Sounding Good

The hills are alive with Sing-A-Long Sound of Music.

Let's start at the very beginning, shall we? For much of the movie-going public, the 1965 film debut of Rodgers and Hammerstein's The Sound of Music marked the start of a lifelong love affair. Hot on the heels of her turn as Mary Poppins the year before, Julie Andrews secured her rightful place as the world's sweetheart in the role of the mischievous but lovable Fräulein Maria. Based on the true story of the Trapp Family Singers, The Sound of Music is one of the best-loved musicals of all time.

Nearly forty years after the film's premiere, Sing-A-Long Sound of Musicoffers a unique experience for anyone who's ever twirled around in a mountain meadow; gotten weepy at the sight of an emotional Captain joining his children in song; looked up the words "roué" and "ken"; or -- admit it -- yodeled along with "The Lonely Goatherd." It's a chance to, well, sing along as you watch the film and participate in an interactive adventure that includes such activities as hissing at the Baroness and waving your edelweiss. (Complimentary "Fun Packs" will be provided, along with guidance from an on-stage emcee.) Lyrics will be subtitled for anyone who doesn't already know every word.

The touring production is being brought to the Paramount Theatre by Barry Fey and House of Blues. A special preview showing on Wednesday, October 16, will benefit the Colorado AIDS Project. Jackie Long, CAP's director of public relations (and a Music fan herself), emphasizes the event's wholesomeness: "This is something that's really good for families, and families are some of [our] biggest supporters. It's a chance to have fun while we're educating people."

Sing along with Julie at Sing-A-Long Sound of Music, this week and next.
Sing along with Julie at Sing-A-Long Sound of Music, this week and next.

Charmian Carr, the actress who played Liesl, the eldest of the von Trapp children, will make a guest appearance at the benefit. (Teetering on the edge of adulthood -- and the arm of her young Aryan suitor, Rolf -- Liesl was an inspiration for many adolescent girls in the '60s.)

One of the evening's highlights is a costume contest -- and although dressing up is not mandatory, everyone from Frau Schmidt to the Reverend Mother is sure to be in attendance. Don't underestimate the importance of accessories, either: a pinecone here, a silly whistle there... It's all part of the show. Just be sure to march yourselves down (single file, please) to the Paramount and give it all you've got.

Herr Detweiler would be proud.

 
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