Letters to the Editor

From the week of December 19, 2002

Cream of the Crap

Spot news: Great article by Michael Roberts on the difference between the Denver Post and the Rocky Mountain News editorial pages ("Calling All Columnists," December 12). I noticed that the Post filled Tina Griego's spot with some lame-ass column that made the hard-hitting point that its author sure was a dumb cluck and thank goodness for his girlfriend.

Pulitzer committee, take note! Not to be a pest or anything, but wasn't there anything say, on, hmmm, Iraq on the news wires that day? Guess not.

Roberts's Message column is always entertaining and often very prescient, in that it offers concrete proof of my long-held belief that the Post is a piece of crap.

Tom Auclair
via the Internet


Striking Out

Who put the world in world series? Regarding "Our Mitts on You," in the December 12 issue:

Please give Bill Gallo a column on the opinion page, as I'm tired of turning to the sports and film pages looking for articles on -- gasp! -- sports and film only to find Bill enlightening us on the dangers of the world that he feels only he can see. And tell him to use cash next time he goes to Gart's.

Bob Roarke
Denver


It Takes Balls

Just say throw: I just got done reading Eric Dexheimer's dodgeball story ("Dodge This, Dave Ringo!," December 5). I have to admit that I nearly pissed my pants with laughter at the many memories of the Almighty Elementary School Playground Equalizer. Those who profess this to be a "bullies'" game are most likely to have been the fat kids who couldn't avoid having their juicy asses blasted with the red rubber balls.

Grow up, suckers! Dodgeball is really the only place on school grounds where all of the nerdy kids could gang up on the most popular girl and the most jocky jock to send them a scorching/searing shock of pain before the 3 p.m. bell. I played dodgeball, and I'm not anti-social in the least. If anything, dodgeball has taught me how to avoid trouble and has improved my hand-eye coordination. Dodgeball should not be banned in schools; in fact, it should be a sanctioned team sport!

Long live dodgeball!

D. Wright
via the Internet

Child's prey: Dodgeball -- public stoning re-created as a child's game.

Becky Wold
Glendale


Humane Society

Not guilty! In Julie Jargon's December 5 article on sex offenders, "Arrested Development," and in the letters that followed, there was an expressed concern for the victims of these offenders, as well as the prevailing attitude that all convicted sex offenders are deserving of nothing but spending the remainder of their existence incarcerated. What about the other innocent victims of this crime? I speak not of the victims who have been molested, but the victims of false accusation. Once someone has been labeled a sex offender, his life is ruined.

Does anyone realize that innocent men get falsely accused and wrongly convicted? It happens -- absolutely. A sexual assault is a heinous crime with long-lasting ramifications for the victims, and the perpetrators of these crimes need punishment and extensive treatment. But what about the innocent victims who get caught up in this charge and have their lives ruined? Just as DNA evidence is proving every day that innocent men sit on death row for crimes they did not commit, it is no different with sex offenders. A twenty-year-old man has sexual contact with a fifteen-year-old girl who tells him she is eighteen. Someone finds out, and the next thing he knows, he is sitting in prison, labeled a sex offender for life, his future ruined. How many teachers have been falsely accused?

Sexual offenses are the only crimes for which there is no allowance for degree of severity; the only sentence in our laws for that crime is two years to life. All other crimes are judged and sentenced on the severity of circumstances. A person who kills someone is treated far better in this society than anyone with the label of sex offender, regardless of the circumstances of the charges. It is never suggested that there should be a murderer registry.

A sexual offense is a horrible crime, but when you are deciding that everyone charged with that crime should be locked away forever and thought of as the worst kind of animal, remember that in this very imperfect system, there are some other victims, too: the falsely accused. We are reverting back to the time of the Salem witch trials: All it takes is an accusation regardless of motive, and that accusation becomes the truth. Men should be very afraid. It is such a horrible crime, and we are all so willing to believe the worst and destroy these men and their families in the process. There are innocent men in prison, and they, too, are victims. Think how scary it is that all it takes is the word of a child and it could be you sitting in prison for the rest of your life.

Melissa Richards
Boulder

No remorse: Reading "Arrested Development," I can see many similarities between T.H.E. and halfway houses used for drug offenses. At some facilities, for example, addicts are forced to wear diapers, shave their heads and stand against a wall for hours. And anyone convicted of drug possession is placed under substantial hardship, including restrictions on how much water they may drink, because of the possiblity of diluting a urinalysis.

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