Letters to the Editor

From the week of February 20, 2003

The Slime of His Life

Mile hype: Great article by Stuart Steers on Mile High Telecom ("Con Air," February 6). I was a manager there and quit due to all of the lies and misrepresentations. I worked on Wall Street for ten years, but never encountered the slime that I came across at Mile High Telecom. What really pisses me off, though, is the fact that they lied about donating money to the NYC charity that they used in their advertising and as a way to let customers know that they were different from Qwest.

Scumbags!

W. Casey
via the Internet

Don't ask, don't tel: This is an outrage! Not only did investors get swindled out of millions, but so did the employees who work at Mile High Telecom. There are a hundred employees there, and soon they will all be unemployed, with no chance of the employees receiving their pay. It's bad enough that they work there without benefits or vacation or sick time, but now they are working there without pay. Where does the insanity end?

Mile High should be closed down for good, and all the investors need to ante up. Not only are they gambling with other people's money; they are also gambling with other people's livelihoods. The federal penitentiary is too good for these crooks. They need to serve hard time in a real jail and never see daylight again.

Name withheld on request


Katica Got Her Gun

Fire when ready: Great work on "Bull's Eyeful," David Holthouse's article on Katica Crippen in the February 13 issue. Holthouse and Alan Prendergast offer the best investigative journalism in the state.

By the way, though, it's not a "clip." It's a magazine.

Ari Armstrong
via the Internet

Playing with fire: Oh, puleeeeze! While I will give Katica's boyfriend the benefit of the doubt that he "didn't know it was illegal" for a convicted felon to be in possession of a firearm, there is no doubt that Ms. Crippen was informed and chose not to obey the law (which seems to be a pattern with her). I have no sympathy for her situation. It is a shame, however, that the taxpayers are once again having to support her. I think work release is more suitable, so that she can support herself while serving the remainder of her time.

Sheila Maphet
via the Internet

His aim is true: I have always enjoyed David Holthouse's articles. I want to thank you for bringing some light to the issue of those overzealous prosecutions of ridiculous gun-related violations. Westword seems to be the only newspaper in town that reports on this issue with any objectivity. Not only will the Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News not report both sides of the issue, but, as I'm sure you know, they have even gone so far as to prohibit classified ads for individuals selling firearms.

Holthouse's article makes a strong case for putting a stop to the further wasting of taxpayers' money in keeping people like Crippen and other non-violent offenders in prison on technicalities. It makes me wonder just how much of King George's deficit would be eliminated if those non-violent offenders were paroled and the "Safe Neighborhoods" prosecutors were terminated, or at least reduced, or even reassigned to other types of cases. Probably not a lot relative to the size of the deficit, but every little bit does help, especially in a recession. On a smaller scale, in Colorado it would likely have more of an impact.

Columbine and the 9/11 terrorist attacks have certainly contributed to the current atmosphere of fearing guns at all costs. It does seem reasonable that any violent crime, whether a gun is used or not, should be punished. But how far is society willing to let the law-enforcement community go before it says, "Enough already; let's be reasonable about this"? In Crippen's case, she was sent to prison for merely possessing a firearm to pose for some pictures. Yet when a police officer kills an innocent citizen, such as Ismael Mena, he or she gets a paid leave of absence. What has happened to our justice system? What will happen to our civil rights?

Mike Triplet
via the Internet

May the enforce be with you: As a member of the National Rifle Association and supporter of Project Exile, I've been following the Katica Crippen story. People in the media and others call for more firearms laws, but heaven forbid we enforce those laws! Ms. Crippen shows a considerable lack of judgment. Anyone with a room-temperature IQ knows that it is illegal for convicted felons to even pick up a gun. She knew this and did it anyway, and had the guns and her bare rump on the Internet for all to see.

This reminds me of Mark Manes, the Columbine gun vendor. The bleeding hearts came out for him, as well. These federal felonies carry stiff sentences: Don't do the crime if you can't do the time.

The gun grabbers have an agenda, and you are helping them. Pass gun laws, don't enforce them, complain that the gun laws don't work, and go for the next step, which is confiscation. We aren't going to let that happen. We aren't going to turn into the United Kingdom, where self-defense is a crime. Crippen and Manes need to do every minute of their time and be examples of where firearms crime leads. Only then does Project Exile work.

1
 
2
 
3
 
All
 
Next Page »
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 
Loading...