The Show(case) Must Go On!

The quartet, rounded out by pianist Holly Holverson, bassist Dwight Thompson and drummer Kevin Smith, formed in 2001 when Gibson returned to town after a touring stint with the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra. "It was a great experience for me," says Gibson, who was only 21 at the time. "The orchestra played a huge role in my development as a player. There are very few bands that swing that hard anymore." Like much of the jazz that followed in the wake of the bebop revolution, the Clark Gibson Quartet is a tight, almost telepathic unit that modulates from themes and standards to passages of solo improvisation. The faint Latin tinge of the post-bop era is also evident in its sound, but the emphasis is on the sultry, unadulterated swing of vintage pop and blues.

Besides gigging almost every other night of the month at places like Dazzle, Shakespeare's and Sambuca, Gibson and company have just finished producing their debut disc, titled The Offering. With guest trumpeter Greg Gizbert, Gibson's occasional turn at the flute and Thompson's shuddering bowed bass, the album's sound is lush and rich without being cluttered or slick. The soul leaks out like a lover's sigh. "As a band, we realize that we don't have to play a backbeat or play modern to get the attention of the younger generation," Gibson says. "We just have to be ourselves and play what we love." -- Heller

GROUND ZERO MOVEMENT
NOMINATED IN HIP-HOP
4 P.M., OUTDOOR STAGE
"We're action-packed. It's like watching Shaft," says MC Dow Jones of the Ground Zero Movement's live performances. When the four rappers (Ase One, Dow Jones, D.O. the Fabulous Drifter and Sid Fly) throw down with newcomer DJ See Why, the energy is as infectious as a Blaxploitation soundtrack. People don't stand still at the crew's shows; they bounce.

Through dirt-hustling diligence, the Ground Zero fellas have made their presence known. Whether strolling down the 16th Street Mall pushing their product or opening for national acts like Eightball & MJG, the group has been a ubiquitous force in Denver. The past year has seen the release of No Radio Play and a recently issued full-length, Tangerine V.I.P. er (pronounced "vipper"); according to Dow Jones, the discs "bring back the roots of real hip-hop." They're also bringing hip-hop to a wider audience: The State of Colorado recently selected Ground Zero's single "The Weakest Link" for its Get Real anti-smoking campaign this summer. The group is slated to perform at the state's Youth Summit this summer.

While the Ground Zero Movement hopes to become the first rap act to blow up outside of Denver, its members are content to provide an outlet for local artists looking to get their shine on. "We're just trying to knock down the doors for everybody. Everybody thinks hip-hop is dead, and we're trying to resurrect it," says Ase One. -- James Mayo

HEAVYWEIGHT DUB CHAMPION
NOMINATED IN HIP-HOP
9 P.M., THE CHURCH
Heavyweight Dub Champion is in a state of expansion. Core members Patch and Resurrector have recently traveled the globe scouting for sounds and video footage that they can use to complement their illbient mix of hip-hop dubtronica and multimedia stage presentation.

"We've been expanding the empire in terms of visuals and video, and in terms of gathering resources," says Resurrector. "Patch was in Borneo taking vocal samples from villagers, which we are appropriating into the music. I went on a trip around the world. I went to Egypt, Myanmar, India, Bali and Cambodia. It's basically spiritual footage. I filmed inside the great pyramids and in the temples of southern India. We're taking that video footage and turning it into our live show."

The show, "The Liberation Process" -- which hits the Ogden Theatre on June 27 -- reflects the collective's belief that the meditative qualities of its music can help audiences achieve a liberated state of being. The Champs are also busy working on a followup to their acclaimed Survival Guide for the End of Time. The as-yet-untitled CD will be issued with an accompanying DVD.

"We're hoping to find a middle ground between what it is we do in our live performances -- the meditative, mantra-like qualities -- and what we tend to do in the studio," says Resurrector. "The discs will explore similar themes as on Survival Guide, and it will reflect our travels."

The crew expects to have the discs out by November; by then, half the group -- Patch, Resurrector and Totter -- will have moved to San Francisco. "We've been trying to expand to Asia, and this will bring us closer to that, but the main thing is, we're trying to network with other artists while keeping our foundation in Colorado," Resurrector says. "Half the band [Apostle, Stero Lion, DJ Illnaughty] will go back and forth when we tour." Hopefully, the Champions will visit often: Losing them completely would be a heavy blow. -- Mayo

HEMI CUDA
NOMINATED IN PUNK
When God was handing out rock, Hemi Cuda must have been pretty far up in the line. Guitarist Anika Zappe and bassist Karen Exley formed the band in 1998 and, after a succession of drummers, conscripted Scott Padawer to man the skins. "I don't think we had any big, contrived notions of what we wanted to do when we started," says Zappe. "I was coming from more of a garage-rock background at that time, and I think Karen was more of a fan of metal. We have a lot of similar interests, too, but the things that are different are the things that make the music more interesting."

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
All
 
Next Page »
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 
Loading...