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Letters to the Editor

From the week of August 28, 2003

No Nudes Is Good News

A site for sore eyes:Excellent job by Eric Dexheimer on "A Model Prisoner," in the August 14 issue. It's so nice to read an objective story on this matter, one with some real data in it. After Jim Grady was first arrested, I managed over the next few months to extract almost a sentence or two of facts out of the endless piles of media horseshit vomited up by the two stations mentioned (as well as our local "news-less-papers"), and I actually remember asking my wife, "I wonder how long before we can read the real story in Westword about all this?"

It's so pathetic the way the media often jump to the politically correct hype of finding someone they can lead a lynch mob to with the cry of "Child Molester!" or "Child Porn!" Of course, our bumbling DAs and lawmen fall all over themselves trying to exploit every aspect of that witch-hunt mentality they can, while fully ignoring American concepts such as "innocent until proven guilty" and then nearly breaking their own arms in their desperate attempts to pat themselves on the back in front of the cameras.

Maybe the lesson on this should be for law enforcement to shut the fuck up about what they are doing until they actually have something to talk about. But then there would be no "breaking story" with people like the holier-than-thou Tom Martino breaking wind for everyone to hear and smell. In the meantime, who cares if Jim Grady's business, finances and life were destroyed by our Laurel-and-Hardy duo of prosecutors and local media in this town? After all, he was just another godless pornographer.

Never mind that over half the people prosecuting him and judging him while watching the news story from home were probably paying members of his Web site -- or one like it.

Sam Coffman
Lakewood

Teen angles:James Grady has, and apparently continues, to exploit young women -- among them my daughter. My daughter, who was then under eighteen, asked me if she could "model" for Grady. When I asked her what she would be modeling, she said lingerie and bathing suits. I said no way -- after all, it wasn't a JC Penney catalogue, but an Internet Web site, the likes of which are notorious hangouts for pedophiles. Still, she ended up on the Web site and was one of the two girls involved in the April 2002 raid.

Even after all that, once his trial was over, Grady had the gall -- or maybe the word is "balls" -- to contact her by letter, telling her he was again open for business. He even put his return address on the envelope -- a dangerous but ballsy move, should the letter fall into the hands of an irate parent like me. Luckily, my husband talked me out of going over to his Littleton apartment and beating the crap out of him.

As for the parents who actually signed those contracts, they are either stupid, illiterate, greedy or a combination of all three. Shame on them. They are as guilty of exploitation as Grady is. As for his claim that he was only making $2,000 a month off these girls, I am sure that is all he paid taxes on, too. Grady has all the earmarkings of a master con man, and to prove it, even you fell for his "sad" story.

Name withheld on request

Hug a thug:From Eric Dexheimer's "A Model Prisoner," it is apparent that the real organized criminals are the gang of armed thugs who destroyed James Grady's life and held him captive for a year. They all ought to be summarily fired and fined for the cost, not the taxpayers.

Criminal thugs destroying innocent men in Colorado are no different from those pictured in the recent film Gangs of New York. Despicable crime was committed, and the criminals wore blue.

Bob Allen
via the Internet

Editor's note: Two weeks ago, James Grady filed notice with the 18th Judicial District of his intent to sue Arapahoe County officials for wrongful arrest, false imprisonment and malicious prosecution. Grady's federal lawsuit will ask for more than $10 million in damages, according to his attorneys.


Read It and Weep

Spin, spin, spin: I hope Julie Jargon didn't get dizzy from all the spinning when she interviewed Sally Mentor Hay for her August 14 "Score!" I am surprised that Jargon took Mentor Hay at face value and produced the "rah-rah," superficial reporting I'm used to reading about CSAP in the mainstream news. Ever since I was a student at East High School and picked up a copy to read on the #15 bus on the way to school, I've expected Westword to uncover the deeper story. But now, as a teacher in the Denver Public Schools who taught the new literacy program in its pilot year, I am disappointed in Westword's reporting.

All it takes is two minutes on the DPS Web site to see that the growth in DPS scores is a trend that has been ongoing since 1997. (Go to http://testing.dpsk12.org/secure/new.htm and select "CSAP Grades 3-10 and Colorado ACT Summary Results" to see for yourself.) Mentor Hay heralds increases in reading and writing that average 3 percent. So what? That's about the average yearly rate of increase since CSAP has been administered. The DPS's rates of growth are as good as the average yearly rates of growth statewide; when one teaches to a test, the students score higher on the test.

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