Dumpster Divas

Zine benefit turns trash into flash, cash

FRI, 4/23

"My mission is to make something new out of an old piece of crap that nobody wanted anymore and to bring forth genius -- satirical, irony-filled attitude -- to a mundane world of fashion drones," says Boulderite Rachel White, who will show her new designs at tonight's Retrofit warehouse party. "I plan to punch Prada square in the ass!" Or perhaps Prada, Costume National and other cutting-edge haute couture houses can take style notes from White's street sensibilities. Fashion trendsetters have been known to strut their stuff everywhere from mortuaries to churches, but White and a host of other designers are doing them one better by staking out the alleyways.

"We're closing off an alleyway and throwing the fashion show in there with full-on dumpsters and puddles of oil and a ghetto runway made of old packing pallets," explains Jared Jacang Maher, who organized the event as a fundraiser for the zine Jigsaw.

The politics-and-culture mag was founded last year by Maher and a group of friends disgruntled with the University of Colorado's journalism program "funneling students toward corporate media outlets." The Jigsaw crew now needs about $2,000 to print its next issue and is using the sell-cups-for-rent business model to scrape up the cash with Retrofit. Just ten dollars at the door of MoonRise Co-op-- a warehouse/ media co-op/biodiesel haven at 38th and Walnut streets in Boulder -- buys an all-evening pass to fashion shows featuring such stuff as shirts dyed with mold and dresses made out of old Clorox bottles; DJs spinning tunes; movie screenings from the Obsolete Gods Film Project; Jigsaw readings; King Mob's live-action painting; and booze.

Prada had better cover its ass.

Doors open for the 21-and-over event at 10 p.m.; for more information, log on to www.alliance4indymedia.org. -- Amy Haimerl

NOTE: The Retrofit event has been postponed due to the weather. Please check the website listed above for further information.

Block Heads
Architecture Week builds appreciation for design
FRI, 4/23

Over the next few days, pay a little more attention to the steel, concrete and wood structures that make up our surroundings. That's the spirit of the American Institute of Architects Colorado's annual Architecture Week. "The whole point is to get the general public more aware, interested and excited about architecture," says AIA Colorado executive director Sonia Riggs. "With buildings like the new convention center and the public library, Denver now has some architecture that is nationally recognized."

The week kicks off tonight with the Young Architects Awards Gala & Beaux Arts Ball at the Museum of Contemporary Art/Denver from 6 p.m. to midnight. Ticket prices range from $10 to $40.

Tomorrow, little tykes can start thinking about design and construction at the free Box City event, where elementary-school kids and their parents will build a miniature cardboard city at the Wellington E. Webb Municipal Office Building from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

If you want to learn more about the Denver Art Museum's expansion plans, hobnob with architect Daniel Libeskind on April 27 from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at MAD at the DAM, a free cocktail party. At 7:30 the following morning, AIA Colorado and the Downtown Denver Partnership will host a breakfast lecture with Libeskind at the Hyatt Regency Denver. Admission is free for DDP/AIA members, $25 for the public.

For more information and a complete schedule, visit www.aiacolorado.org or call 303-446-2266. -- Julie Dunn

Disease With Ease
SAT, 4/24

Find out how to avoid a nasty bunch of maladies at today's Wildlife Diseases and You, a seminar sponsored by the Colorado Wildlife Federation and the National Wildlife Federation. "When it comes to wildlife diseases like chronic wasting disease and the West Nile virus, we felt like there was a lot of misinformation and concern out there," says the CWF's Dennis Buechler, moderator of the event. "So we decided to have a public forum to explain to the average person what the diseases are, how they spread and how people can avoid them."

The symposium features lectures, a panel discussion and a question-and-answer session with experts from the Colorado Department of Health and Environment, Colorado State University, the University of Wyoming and others; discussion will focus mainly on CWD and West Nile, but will also touch on hepatitis A, the bubonic plague and other communicable strains.

Wildlife Diseases and You will be held from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Auditorium #2 at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds, 15200 West Sixth Avenue in Golden. Admission is $20 for the general public, $15 for students. For further information, call 303-987-0400. -- Julie Dunn

Got Contest?
Shake Stuff Up seeks healthy teens
SAT, 4/24

The familiar "Got Milk?" ad campaign has done wonders to increase the silliness quotient of the celebs who've posed with white slashes over their lips. But the campaign has yet to convince many American teens that calcium is not only cool, but necessary.

So the same industry folks who launched the ad campaign are now sponsoring a hundred-city Shake Stuff Up tour to get young folks to swallow the message about the benefits of milk products. The tour rolls into town today and stops from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of the University of Denver's Shwayder Art Building, 2121 East Asbury Avenue. Contestants can slurp some white stuff and have their pictures snapped for entry into a national contest; the winner will appear in a mustache ad in Rolling Stone. There's also a national dance competition, whose winner will get a trip to the 2005 MTV Summer Beach House. Although the free event is geared toward teens, all ages are welcome.

Other tour stops: Sunday, April 25, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at First and Cook streets; Wednesday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Wal-Mart at 5650 South Chambers Road, Aurora, and 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Conoco station at 12780 Colorado Boulevard, Thornton. For information, log on to www.whymilk.com. -- Ernie Tucker

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