Now Showing

Poetry and Stone. Cab Childress, architect emeritus at the University of Denver, has been contributing to Colorado's and neighboring states' built environments for the past fifty years. Poetry and Stone: Cab Childress Architect at DU's Victoria H. Myhren Gallery surveys his impressive career with drawings, photos, models and other artifacts. In the late 1950s, when Childress was right out of architecture school, he was a modernist. Gradually, as early as the '70s, he came to embrace post-modernism. His best-known works are those on the DU campus, making it the perfect setting for this handsome retrospective. Childress designed many of the buildings constructed at the school during the last ten years or so, either alone or in concert with other firms. Together, they have completely remade the look of the campus. Through August 27 at the Victoria H. Myhren Gallery, Swayed Art Building, 2121 East Asbury Avenue, 303-871-2846.

Repeat Offenders. The summer extravaganza at the Singer Gallery of the Mizel Center for Arts and Culture is Repeat Offenders: Serial Works by Colorado Artists. This large, over-the-top exhibit was put together by Simon Zalkind, Singer's highly regarded director and curator. The idea for the show -- work that has repeated or related imagery -- is fairly open ended since nearly all artists work in series. That means that nearly anyone could have been eligible -- which is probably why he crammed in pieces by more than two dozen artists. For the show, Zalkind selected paintings, prints and photographs by some of the best-known talents in the area, including, among a host of others, Stephen Batura, Roland Bernier, Clare Cornell, Sushe Felix, Susan Goldstein, Karen Kitchel, Bethany Kriegsman, Jerry Kunkel, Andrea Modica, Jeff Star and Eric Zimmer. In addition, Zalkind put in work by a smattering of youngsters just out of the gate. The kids hold up surprisingly well in the heady company, especially emerging photographer Jason Patz. Through August 22 at the Singer Gallery, Mizel Center for Arts and Culture, 350 South Dahlia Street, 303-399-2660. Reviewed June 24.

scene Colorado/sin Colorado. The Denver Art Museum's local extravaganza, scene Colorado/sin Colorado, has quickly become one of the most talked-about shows this year. And that's no surprise considering that it includes more than three dozen Colorado artists represented by more than seventy works of art. Dianne Vanderlip, curator of modern and contemporary art, organized the exhibit, pulling work from the impressive holdings of the DAM's permanent collection. A couple of the artists included no longer live here, but their works in this show were created when they did. Vanderlip decided to exclude deceased Colorado artists -- and that's too bad. However, even with this limitation, she's undeniably assembled a worthy cavalcade of talent. Though far from encyclopedic, the show does cover a lot of ground. Through August 22 at the Denver Art Museum, 100 West 14th Avenue Parkway, 720-865-5000. Reviewed June 17.

Truth, Tales and Other Lies. The current duet at the Edge Gallery, Truth, Tales and Other Lies, pairs up work by Tim Flynn and Gayla Lemke. Both Flynn and Lemke are established artists who have exhibited around the area for years. Flynn is well known for his delicate, constructed sculptures, and Lemke for her ceramics sculptures. Flynn incorporates bent metal wire into his pieces, which recall abstract surrealism from the 1930s. Lemke is more pointed in her narrative because she marks her ceramics with words that clearly convey her sentiments. In "Hope Stones," Lemke covered small, ceramic shapes with quotes questioning the value of war. The forms are evocative of natural stones, but the words are crisp and mechanical, having been made with typeset letters pushed into the clay when it was wet. Both through August 8 at the Edge Gallery, 3658 Navajo Street, 303-838-8571.

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