Uplifting Charity

Bras for the Cause raises money for breast cancer

I have never donated my bra to anything. Not even to the Village Idiot, my friends' New York honky-tonk with a time-honored tradition of demanding bras in exchange for the honor of dancing on the bar. And I danced on that bar a lot. I saw no reason to part with a $40 scrap of material when scores of other young women were happy to add to the large collection hanging from the ceiling and over the beer lights.

So when I heard about Bras for the Cause, I couldn't help but giggle. A lot. I imagined my friend Tommy, whose bar spawned Coyote Ugly, drunkenly sweet-talking gals out of their Underoos, telling them it was for a good cause: his amusement and cheap decor.

Sadly, the Idiot closed earlier this month, thus ceding Bras for the Cause -- at least in my mind -- to the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. And the ladies here have a much more dignified view of the matter. All this month, Cherry Creek Shopping Center has been decked out with bustiers decorated by celebrities and local artists -- from Olivia Newton-John and Jay Leno to Lauri Lynnxe Murphy and Sarah Magness -- as well as a photo exhibit of 100 Colorado breast-cancer survivors. "It's good that we learn more about breast cancer and see who is surviving, see the hope," says marketing director Lisa Herzlich.

Bras for the Cause has plenty of wearable art.
Bras for the Cause has plenty of wearable art.
Ethan Wenberg

This is the last week to get a glimpse of the goods -- some with apt names such as the "Hot Flash" and the "Itty Bitty Titty Bra" -- before they come down and take center stage at the annual Pink Tie Affair, which takes place Friday, October 29, at Wings Over the Rockies Air and Space Museum and will be emceed by Leno himself.

Tickets to the gala are $250 to $1,000, but bidding on the one-of-a-kind signed lingerie is already happening on eBay and will continue through November 5, with a reserve of $200. Last year the foundation raised $40,000 from its first-ever bra sale; I'll bet they'd make a mint if a few Denver hotties hopped atop the bar and gyrated in cowboy boots and bustiers.

It worked for Tommy -- at least until gentrification arrived.

Visit www.susangkomen.org for more information. -- Amy Haimerl

Marczyk's Harvest
SAT, 10/23

Fall is to East Coasters what ski season is to many Coloradans: that long-awaited beautiful time of year when you revel in your signature natural resources.

"We're both from back East," says Barbara Macfarlane, who, along with her husband, Pete Marczyk, owns Marczyk Fine Foods, at 770 East 17th Avenue. "We love the fall -- the colors, the cooler days, the smell in the air. It's our favorite season."

So every year, the neighborhood market greets the autumn like a red-cheeked child eager to leap into a pile of leaves. And this year is no exception.

Today from noon to 4 p.m., Marczyk's Fall Festival celebrates with cider-making and tasting, caramel apples and fresh cider doughnuts. The smell of mashed apples will mix with barbecue smoke as visitors scour the pumpkin patch for orange, white, green and blue pumpkins to take home.

"Too many people in the city let the change of season go unnoticed," Macfarlane says. "This is our way of honoring it."

For details, call 303-894-9499. -- Adam Cayton-Holland

Give Into the Groove
FRI, 10/22

The secret ingredient to a flavorful salsa isÖa swivel?

"It's really whether or not your hips are loose enough," says Sue Dorsey, executive director of the Denver chapter of Friendship Bridge, which hosts tonight's third annual Salsathon. The zesty dance competition and silent auction will benefit indigent women and children in Guatemala by providing small- business loans.

And if you're more of a stumbler than a salsero, Salsathon includes dance instruction so you can still discover the charm of the claves while contributing to the cause. The non-profit Friendship Bridge, says Dorsey, "is true to its name, and Salsathon helps bridge our cultures together."

Feel the beat from 7 to 10:30 p.m. at El Jebel Shrine Center, 4625 West 50th Avenue; tickets are $20 at the door. For details, call 303-674-0717 or visit www.friendshipbridge.org/salsathon.htm. -- Kity Ironton

Suburban Legends
Douglas County airs its wacky side
MON, 10/25

We've heard that people in Highlands Ranch are considered a little kooky, but the Douglas County History Research Center says "Douglas County can be downright strange." The DCHRC proves it tonight at Legends and Oddities of Douglas County, the telling of tales from the darker side of the high plains.

The terror-laden topics will include the 1968 sighting of a UFO-like "large bubble-shaped object" by over thirty people in Castle Rock; the ghost of Julia Kistler (which leans over the balcony of her childhood home at the Highlands Ranch Mansion); and the legendary Monster of Plum Creek -- a green-faced "grotesque ape man" who swung dead chickens over his head and was pursued by over 2,000 people in the spring of 1954.

The spooky parables have spawned a video series on Douglas County's television station, DC-8. The series has been researched by archivist Shaun Boyd, DC-8's Dave Wruck and documentarian David Schler. The terror-tracking trio will reunite at tonight's free hair-raising discussion. "I have some pretty crazy stories," says Boyd. "I guess I'm kind of the weird ghost librarian in Castle Rock."

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