Now Showing

 Anxiety and Desire. Clare Cornell, assistant professor of digital imaging at the Metropolitan State College of Denver, put together Anxiety and Desire, an exhibit of photo-based pieces that address psychological concepts. He included work from an array of artists from around the country, each working in their own ways, though much of it is only vaguely psychological in content. Cinthea Fiss takes photos of bedridden people on television. Donna Tracy uses special effects to create portraits of people and animals. Leta Evaskus does montages of nude women with their X-rays, while Robert Flynt's montages combine historic shots with contemporary ones. Mark Kessell does oddball, intimate portraits. Clarissa Sligh records a woman becoming a man. And finally, Mary Beth Heffernan photographs copies of Christ's loincloth made of chicken skin -- no kidding. Anxiety and desire are strange concepts on which to hang an art show, which is surely why the art in this show is so strange. Through January 15 at the Center for Visual Art, 1734 Wazee Street, 303-294-5207.

Filters of the Twentieth Century. Over the last couple of decades, there's increasingly been a problem with making neat and tidy distinctions between photojournalism and fine-art photography. Art is exactly what's in store for viewers of Filters of the Twentieth Century: Margaret Bourke-White, Carl Mydans on display at Cherry Creek's Gallery M. True, Bourke-White and Mydans were photojournalists, but their works are examples of fine-art photography anyway. Bourke-White did Life magazine's first cover, "Fort Peck Dam," in 1936; an estate print of it is included at Gallery M. The exhibit also has photos Bourke-White took for Erskine Caldwell's 1939 book, You Have Seen Their Faces, which was her personal response to photos of the rural poor taken for the Farm Service Administration. Like Bourke-White, Mydans was one of the first generation of Life photographers, and before that he worked for the FSA. The show could be criticized for being way too crowded, but considering what it's crowded with -- stunning images by Bourke-White and Mydans -- who cares? Through January 31 at Gallery M, 2830 East Third Avenue, 303-331-8400. Reviewed October 14.

herbert bayer. Trained at Germany's famous Bauhaus, multimedia artist Herbert Bayer is one of the most famous creative talents ever to have been associated with Colorado. After fleeing Nazi Germany, Bayer wound up in Aspen in the 1940s, living there until his death in the 1980s. Hugo Anderson, director of Denver's Emil Nelson Gallery, knew the modern master and still has access to his work. As a result, the city's coziest little art space is presenting herbert bayer: maquettes, a museum-quality show that focuses on Bayer's models for sculptures, most of which were never built -- unlike his "Articulated Wall" at the Denver Design Center. Most of the pieces date from the late 1960s into the '70s, and nearly all are composed of identical shapes lined, stacked or piled up into a single form in bright colors. The simplicity -- and the repetition of identical shapes -- reminds us that Bayer's first claim to fame was as a graphic designer. Supplementing these gorgeous sculpture maquettes are drawings, prints and posters. Through November 27 at the Emil Nelson Gallery, 1307 Bannock Street, 303-534-0996.

NOT YOUR TYPE. he Singer Gallery at the Mizel Center for Arts and Culture is presenting NOT YOUR TYPE: Works in Words by Roland Bernier, Rick Griffith and Martin Mendelsberg, an art show about words. Simon Zalkind, Singer's director, organized the exhibit as the visual-art component of the center's annual Leah Cohen Festival of Books and Authors. Zalkind cleverly put graphics -- a widely seen but rarely exhibited art form -- with that old exhibition workhorse: painting. The lone painter in the show, Roland Bernier, has been using words as an aesthetic device for nearly forty years. Bernier's work looks great next to the graphics of Rick Griffith and Martin Mendelsberg, because they also use words to make their art -- but for different reasons. Bernier is one of the modern masters of the area, and Griffith and Mendelsberg are both extremely well known. It's a diverse group of pieces, but the show is somewhat unified because there are all those words everywhere. Through December 30 at the Mizel Center for Arts and Culture, 350 South Dahlia Street, 303-399-2660.

PILLish, et al. Cydney Payton, director of the Museum of Contemporary Art/Denver, has been busy lately. She oversaw the architectural competition to select a designer for the museum's soon-to-be-constructed new building (the winner: David Adjaye), and she's been lining up money to pay for it, which is a full-time job in itself. But somehow she was also able to put together the three shows currently at the MCA. On the main floor is PILLish: Harsh Realities and Gorgeous Destinations, which takes aim at the drug culture, both of the illicit and prescription kind. The exhibit includes a roster of international artists -- among them, Larry Clark, Damien Hirst, Nan Goldin, Takashi Murakami and Fred Tomaselli -- as well as Colorado's own Albert Chong. Closely related in content to PILLish (because it has a medicine chest in it) is Paola Ochoa's True Love, a video installation nestled in a space under the mezzanine. Ochoa was the first artist selected for the MCA's NEW PIC program, which highlights emerging talent. On the mezzanine is Shadows and Fog, a solo by Margaret Neumann, an early exponent of neo-expressionism. All through January 2 at the Museum of Contemporary Art/Denver, 1275 19th Street, 303-298-7554.

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