Now Showing

Our Culture Is Our Resistance. The Colorado Photographic Arts Center only rarely presents single-artist exhibitions, as it's doing now with Our Culture Is Our Resistance: Repression, Refuge and Healing in Guatemala. The show focuses on the work of Denver photographer and CPAC member Jonathan Moller, who, between 1993 and 2003, took annual trips to Guatemala to capture village life in the war-torn country. The subjects of Moller's very ethnographic-style work are the indigenous Maya people who were terrorized and uprooted by the protracted civil war. At first glance, the photos seem to be slice-of-life shots, à la National Geographic, but it soon becomes apparent that they've been posed. The images are published in a book with the same epic title that includes poetry, essays and testimonials. It's available for purchase at CPAC, with sale proceeds going to the Association for Justice and Reconciliation in Guatemala. Note: This show will be the last CPAC offering until next fall, as the center's building will be extensively remodeled over the summer. Through April 23 at the Colorado Photographic Arts Center, 1513 Boulder Street, 303-455-8999.

Red, White and Black. The young artist with the epic name of Jared David Paul Anderson is a one-man art movement. Not only is he a serious painter, as he demonstrates in the Assembly gallery's Red, White and Black, but he's quite the organizer. In addition to running the Assembly, Anderson founded an artist collective whose members work in the studios above the gallery; he also manages the Annex, just around the corner, at Eighth Avenue and Santa Fe Drive, where those artists show their stuff. His most recent project has been cleaning up the alley behind the two galleries and installing a "Ghetto Garden." The garden area is walled off from the alley by a massive sculpture Anderson made of doors; the installation briefly became a zoning cause célèbre when city officials determined that it is illegal to build a fence out of doors and sought to have it removed. The piece is safe now, since it was officially declared a work of art. Anderson -- who is going by the name Jared David Paul for this show -- does neo-abstract expressionist paintings on paper and board using only red on red, white on white or black on black. He has written that these paintings grew out of his interest and study of aboriginal art from Australia and traditional Chinese art, but they look like they have a lot of New York School in them, too. Through April 30 at the Assembly, 766 Santa Fe Drive, 303-573-5501.

Siqueiros. The exhibition Siqueiros: Spirit of a Revolutionary at the Museo de las Américas is evidence that the beleaguered institution -- which all but collapsed last year -- is still alive and kicking. The gorgeous exhibit, put together by Alfonso Miranda Marquez of the Museo Soumaya in Mexico City, includes more than a score of works by one of the greatest Mexican artists of all time: David Alfaro Siqueiros. Using paintings, drawings and watercolors, Marquez economically surveys the artist's career from the 1910s to the 1970s. Siqueiros was one of "Los Tres Grandes" of the Mexican mural movement, and like the other two -- Diego Rivera and Jose Clemente Orozco -- he created work with one eye on vanguard styles developing in Europe, and the other on left-wing political action at home in Mexico. An interesting aspect of Siqueiros's style is that it had an influence on artists in the United States, and not just the social realists, but the abstract expressionists, as well. Through April 23 at the Museo de las Américas, 861 Santa Fe Drive, 303-571-4401. Reviewed March 10.

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