Sketches

Brief reviews of current shows

Apparition. The brand-new Gallery Severn, which is owned by art collector and retired executive Andy Dodd, aims to be what he has called a "launch pad" for emerging artists. This specialty in fresh faces instantly makes the place interesting. Also interesting is Dodd's decision to feature only one artist at a time so that the gallery can promote individuals, individually. Limiting inventory in this way seems like a risky business move, but who knows? It might just work. For the inaugural exhibition, Apparition: The Act of Appearing, Dodd chose to highlight abstract paintings by Dante Ortiz, a young artist who is little known in Denver. Born in Colorado, Ortiz was educated at the Rhode Island School of Design, earning degrees in landscape architecture and fine arts. This led directly to his founding of Studio Forma, a landscape design firm in Boulder. Last year he started painting again, creating the abstracts of overlapping color fields set off by enthusiastic scribbles that make up this show. These bright Ortiz paintings look pretty good in the tidy space. Through June 30 at Gallery Severn, 3210 Tejon Street, 303-532-9369.

Chimera. The University of Denver's Victoria H. Myhren Gallery is hosting an unusual multimedia installation called Chimera. The title refers to a mythical female demon, and young South African artist Minnette Vári places herself in that difficult role. The piece, done in 2001, focuses on the "Voortrekker Monument" in Pretoria, which honors the Afrikaner pioneers of the nineteenth century. It's perfect for Vári's purposes, as the artist has been interested in the racial politics that have been standard fare in her homeland for decades. The monument depicts many figures in a classical, Greco-Roman style, and it's all been done in white marble, which has an added poignancy when we remember that it honors the white people who at one time took over the black-majority country. That's surely why Vári (who is white, incidentally) digitally turned the monument black in her video projections. She also distorts its forms, animating them, and inserts self-portraits, disguising herself as the she-devil of the title. Through May 7 at the Victoria H. Myhren Gallery, 2121 East Asbury Avenue, 303-871-2846.

Colorado Clay 2006. Beginning some thirty years ago, Foothills Art Center in Golden established Colorado Clay as an annual juried exhibit highlighting ceramics. But this year, director Jenny Cook changed its format into a biennial. Colorado Clay 2006 is a good group show, but it is somewhat disappointing in comparison to past outings. This is the case because celebrity juror Michel Conroy chose too many goofy ceramics and too few functional pieces, and because curator Michael Chavez randomly scattered the pieces around instead of grouping the works of individual artists together. Among the standouts are the sculptural ewers by Paul Morris, Bebe Alexander's architectonic lidded bottles, the quirky and beautifully glazed figures by Caroline Douglas, and Jim Klingman's classic wheel-turned vessels. Others represented in the show include Katie Caron, Amy Chavez, Christine Owen, Julie McNair, MaryLynn Schumacher, Valerie and Jonathan Nicklow, Kazu Obu, David Beumée, Peggy Crago and Joyce Bikel. Through May 7 at Foothills Art Center, 809 15th Street, Golden, 303-279-3922. Reviewed April 6.

Denver's Pictorial Photographer. The Colorado Photographic Art Center no longer has a permanent home, but it's still going. The group has held on to its impressive permanent collection, which is where the material for Denver's Pictorial Photographer, now at Gallery Roach, comes from. The title refers to R. Ewing Stiffler's work done in the pictorialist style in the early twentieth century. As opposed to following the documentary tradition, which dominated early photography, pictorial photographers responded to painting. A signature example is Stiffler's "Labor Glorified," from 1925. In truth, however, not everything in the show is pictorialist, which makes the title slightly misleading. Stiffler was born in 1888 in Missouri but came to Denver as a teenager, graduating from East High School in 1908. Among the several colleges he attended was the Chicago Art Institute. The CPAC show at Roach is a rare opportunity to see Stiffler's work; some of these pieces have not been exhibited since 1935, when the Denver Art Museum mounted a pictorialist group show. This is the first of many CPAC shows that will be installed around town. Through April 29 at Gallery Roach, 860 Broadway, 303-839-5202.

Finding Place, The Last Supper and 38 of 50. There’s an unusual show called Finding Place: Life in Ritual on display in the main gallery at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Fort Collins. The exhibit not only incorporates dance, video and painting, but also interconnects and interprets them. Dancers Judy Bejarano and Lisa Morgan created movements based on everyday rituals while visual artists Kaidi Dunstan and John Giarrizzo did pieces based on the dancers. Conceptual artist randall sinner brought it all together by recording the dancers and the visual artists on video and in photos, thus interpreting the interpretations. On the mezzanine, sinner is the subject of a solo titled 38 of 50: CAPITOL EMBROIDERY. The show documents a performance piece sinner's done on the steps of 38 of 50 state capitol buildings, in which he embroiders ropes in the manner of state flags as a protest against the death penalty. The companion exhibit, Julie Green's The Last Supper, is made up of white plates decorated to depict the last-meal requests of inmates on death row. Finding Place through May 20, The Last Supper and 38 of 50, through May 13, all at the Museum of Contemporary Art, 201 South College Avenue, Fort Collins, 1-970-482-2787.

1
 
2
 
All
 
Next Page »
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 
Denver Event Tickets
Loading...