Lemke says the piece is about the difference between the richest 1 percent of the U.S. population, symbolized by the copper dome at the top of the tall spire, with the little houses at the bottom standing in for the rest of us. Unlike the other artists, Lemke is up front about her support for Obama, and the show's title, Enough, is taken from the senator's acceptance speech at Invesco Field at Mile High. Then there are "Hope Stones," small ceramic stones adorned with Obama quotes; "Life of the Party," which includes ceramics bottles of Obama brand champagne; and "Transition," which brings together quotes by Abraham Lincoln, Plato and Obama incised into large ceramic stones.

The last of the four shows at Edge, Picture Peace, is in the back room and is made up of a group of square panels by Virginia Unseld. What Unseld has done is to combine painted backgrounds with found objects and quotes about peace. The title work has a brushy white ground with the title also done in white. In the bottom center is a small cut-out chamber in which Unseld has placed a sand dollar. Rather than point fingers, Unseld's pieces simply express hope for peace.

Speaking of hope, that's what this election is partly about; the hope for change, the hope that we'll throw out the bums and find a better future. The artists at Edge are doing their part to pull off this lofty goal; on Tuesday, it will be up to the rest of us.

"The Great Divide," by Gayla Lemke, stone, concrete and ceramics.
"The Great Divide," by Gayla Lemke, stone, concrete and ceramics.
Installation view of Susan Goldstein's Hijacked, mixed materials.
Installation view of Susan Goldstein's Hijacked, mixed materials.

I never said that I was brave; Hijacked; Enough; Picture Peace

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