Top

news

Stories

 

On October 22, the city issued a letter to Tom Martino asking that he "submit a remedial plan for the purpose of rehabilitating the cited property." Failure to comply could result in fines of up to $999 per day or an injunction for the city to take possession of the property.

Henderson doesn't think it will come to that. "We recognize that there's a problem," he says. "That's why we sat down with the city and police department to try to come up with some sort of solution." Martino wasn't there because he's a hands-off investor, according to Henderson. "We have an operating agreement where I'm actually in charge of taking care of the entitlements and the details," he says. "He understood what we were doing. He understands the end result, and I guess he doesn't really need to know the details of how entitlement works."

Martino's radio producer, Mike Bassett, replied to e-mails sent to Troubleshooter.com, confirming that Martino is one of a group of investors involved with the project. "Yeah, it was bought as an investment. Some of it they planned to develop and others they might sell," he says. Martino did not respond to Westword's calls and e-mails.

Welton Street Properties owns nineteen parcels at the edge of Five Points, including one at 2255 Glenarm, whose garage has become a drug den.
Welton Street Properties owns nineteen parcels at the edge of Five Points, including one at 2255 Glenarm, whose garage has become a drug den.
Welton Street Properties owns nineteen parcels at the edge of Five Points, including one at 2255 Glenarm, whose garage has become a drug den.
Welton Street Properties owns nineteen parcels at the edge of Five Points, including one at 2255 Glenarm, whose garage has become a drug den.

After the meeting, the ownership group signed a "no trespassing order," which will allow the police to roust anyone found on the properties. But although efforts have been made to board up the garage behind the bungalow, it is still accessible through a broken door. This past weekend, the floor was littered with lighter-burned soda cans and syringes, evidence of recent drug-use activity; the yard around it was dotted with human feces. The owners are currently looking for a contractor to demolish the bungalow and garage, Henderson says.

As for the rowhouses, the owners are considering whether they should be fenced, remodeled — or demolished altogether. In the meantime, they've taken down the porch railings so that the homeless can't use them to create temporary walls. But this hasn't discouraged people from coming back to the porches. Though their place is now exposed to the street, Shantrell and A.K. aren't willing to give up their spot just yet.

Mark Herlinger, whose kids attend Ebert Elementary, is head of the school's safety committee. A couple of weeks ago, the school's principal told him that transients had been spotted living in one of the garages on the properties. "Even if there's just one kid, one incident occurred, that would be one too many," he says. On October 20, Herlinger called the Denver police to complain. He learned that there'd been a meeting to discuss the situation a few days before. He hadn't known that Martino was involved with the properties.

"I'm actually kind of a fan of his, really," says Herlinger. "Who can't be, especially if you're somebody he's helped out? Being a junior-league real-estate investor myself, I certainly admire someone who seems to have done well with it. But I don't know any of the details of what he owns around town or his reputation on that level. I just know what he talks about on the radio. I try to learn from him. If he's giving out advice, my ears prick up."

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
All
 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
Sort: Newest | Oldest
 
Loading...