Mazin says he's not worried. "It says nothing about sponsorships in 109," he notes. And so he plans to continue CannaMed's financial aid program.

After all, he insists, the program is designed to help its customers. "My slogan is 'One patient at a time,'" he explains. "I can't sleep at night. Why? Because I'm thinking about every little detail when a patient comes over to our facility."

To do anything else would be bad business. "There is an old saying in sales, the rule of 250," Mazin says. "What it consists of is, if you walk into a sales organization and you go to a salesperson and you tell them you need to buy a pen and they sell you a lighter." For emphasis, he picks up a pen from his desk with one hand, while with the other he grabs one of the lighters he uses to ignite his many cigarettes. "After you leave the store, you say, 'What the fuck happened? How stupid am I? I don't need a lighter, I have hundreds of them at home.' How many people will you tell of that situation? Maybe one. Why? You don't want to tell anybody he made a fool of you and sold you a lighter."

With CannaMed, David Mazin found something new to sell: medical marijuana.
Jim J. Narcy
With CannaMed, David Mazin found something new to sell: medical marijuana.
Scott Carr manages the non-profit THC Foundation, which can't compete with CannaMed's financial aid option.
Jim J. Narcy
Scott Carr manages the non-profit THC Foundation, which can't compete with CannaMed's financial aid option.

On the other hand, he says, "If you walk into a sales organization and get treated like a king and instead of paying a dollar for a pen, you pay 25 cents for a pen, how many people will you tell? At least 250.

"That's what our goal is," he concludes, gesturing with the pen to drive home his point. But his other hand is still holding fast to the lighter.

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