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She began studying meditation more formally even as she earned her master's degree in education from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. When she started working as a middle-school teacher in New York City in 1994, the ascension meditation techniques she'd learned from Ishaya monks who offered workshops in Brooklyn, teaching people to stimulate spiritual growth and connect to a higher self, came in particularly handy. "It was the ascension techniques that kept me functional in the classroom with a group of children who had more critical trauma than I would have ever imagined," she says. "Prostitutes, or children living in a car panhandling because their mother was on crack. There was a thirteen-year-old boy raising his three-year-old sister, and a thirteen-year-old girl who was introduced into prostitution by her brother. One kid with Tourette's — social services went to his house and found only cat food...

"So this is the group of children I'm dealing with, and nothing prepared me for that except the ascension techniques from the monks," she remembers. "That prepared me to be the best resource I could be for the kids without caving under the insurmountable trauma they presented to me that I had no ability to address. That's when I first started seeing that the techniques I was using my whole life were applicable to external situations."

In 1997, Wimberger left New York and moved to Colorado, where she taught at Evergreen High School and Arapahoe Community College and took up drumming. She also started taking survivalist courses, spending a week in the New Jersey pine barrens learning primitive survival techniques, including how to carve a bow drill and start a fire with it, identify edible plants, build primitive shelters, stalk animals — and skin them after bringing them down, brain-tanning the hides for clothing. But she didn't give up on more peaceful pursuits, and continued working with the monks through 1999; they would fly out to her house on weekends to offer in-home workshops, as they do with workshop hosts around the world.

After a year of teaching, Wimberger took a break to become certified as a Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator consultant so that she could offer counseling in the business world. "I saw the corporate need for some techniques to get them more productive, coping better, less reactionary," she says. "Get them to understand their stress was either created or perceived, not life or death. Get them in a reality-based environment. So I started blending the Meyers-Briggs with the techniques that I had studied to create leadership trainings for either bottom-performing segments of the operation or people who really didn't have the best performance reviews and needed a little coaching.

"And somehow, the companies I worked with allowed me to go that way."

Once she started blending the Meyers-Briggs with meditation training, Wimberger felt she needed to go a level deeper with her own credentials. So in 2005 she began an intensive course at Denver's Inner Connection Institute, which was founded by Lauren Skye, a graduate of the Berkeley Psychic Institute in California, who teaches techniques similar to those taught at that school affiliated with the Church of Divine Man, including clairvoyance and psychic awareness. "It was during that two and a half years that I realized a good portion of what they were teaching me was stuff I'd been doing as a child, but it was a new language," she explains. "It was like, 'Oh, this language is for healthy skeptics who really value the left-brain analysis. This language makes sense.' Whereas studying with the monks, I couldn't bring that to certain audiences; it had a dogma attached to it. That dogma wasn't mine, and I didn't necessarily buy that portion of it, but I knew the techniques were important and I could leave the dogma somewhere else. It wasn't until I got the language that I could find a way to get that out to the public."

She founded Trance Personnel Consulting Group in January 2007, during her initial coursework with Inner Connection, and then signed on for another eighteen months of study. While she was training, Wimberger started building her base of private clients, who range from executive leaders to unemployed people who trade for training. In her gorgeously appointed office at the Samadhi Center, you'll often find her listening intently to clients, her voice soothing as she guides them through various visualizations to help them release stress from their past and cope with their futures.

It was some police-work-related stress in her own family that led Wimberger to consider extending her training to law-enforcement trauma. A cousin who was a member of the New York City Police Department was an alcoholic struggling in his marriage, and that struggle was affecting his teenage son. "His son was having a hard time coping with the vicarious trauma his father brought home," Wimberger explains, so she began teaching the teenager meditation and creative visualization.

Her interest piqued, she started to research the psychological hazards of police work and quickly concluded that there was a serious need for preventive stress-management programs.

"There are post-crisis programs," Wimberger notes. "But there's a stigma attached to using those services, because if you're perceived to not be able to handle your job mentally, you're not a good cop. And there are post-crisis interventions, debriefings they do after a shooting, homicide or suicide, and outsourced psychologists who could come and help them."

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41 comments
Gynexin
Gynexin

Do cops really need this?

Lisa Wimberger
Lisa Wimberger

Yes, they really do. With suicide rates off the charts, they need this type of training more than most.

Penci_looie
Penci_looie

They sign up BECAUSE of the stress.

Lisa Wimberger
Lisa Wimberger

I don't know that they "all" sign up for those reasons.

freedom me
freedom me

this has got to be one of the hardest jobs in the world,do you know how much death they see a year ? and are placed in other stressful situations.

Lisa
Lisa

Yes, I do. And I agree, it is one of the hardest jobs in the world. This is why I'm so committed to helping where I can. Thanks for your comment.

Feel free to reach me atinfo@tpconsultinggroup.comwww.tpconsultinggroup.com

self hypnosis guide
self hypnosis guide

Every people needs to de-stress themselves one way or another. Good thing there are a lot of de-stressing methods out there to do. Putting yourself into trance is good but it needs a lot of concentration, focus, and repetition.

the_punnisher
the_punnisher

For this stress relieving system to work, you will have to break the KKK behaviors handed down from the past....YES the DPD WAS the KKK iin the 20s and the 30s in Denver, along with the mayor and the Governor for the State.

It's ingrained; to relieve stress, just pick someone at random, beat the S#it out of them ( or even KILL them ) with no real consequences for your behavior, thanks to the union and the spineless REMFs sitting in the City & County building.

This has the added benefit of the DPD " showing who is the boss in Denver....BOY "

Just like they lynched the Ni....they still have that mentality today, only PC made EVERY CITIZEN a target for a beatdown.

The fact that the city has already shelled out a cool $MIL this year to settle police brutality claims, says much to prove what I have said is true...Checkout the SKINHEAD roster in the DPD....check out the 'roid ragers in the department....check out the deafening silence from the thin blue line...and the threats from the union if someone does try to break that line.

Yes, I'd say your work is cut out for you here in Denver.....

Unless you would rather deal with the " touchy feely " cops up in Boulder....

Lisa Wimberger
Lisa Wimberger

Yes, my work is cut out for me here in the city, and in many places all over the country. I have private clients who have crossed the thin blue line and it's very ugly. . .dangerous. . .deadly. It's why I do what I do. One step at a time!

Lisa Wimberger
Lisa Wimberger

I'm so excited to get this topic out to the public. Police Stress is considered by some to be an epidemic--so any awareness we can bring to it is much appreciated. Don't hesitate to contact me with direct questions about my work.www.tpconsultinggroup.cominfo@tpconsultinggroup.com303.981.9743

Lisa Wimberger

 
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