Original location of troubled Quiznos chain still on the USA Pro Cycling Challenge course

Quiznos, the Denver-based sub-sandwich chain, may no longer be the name sponsor of the USA Pro Cycling Challenge, but the company's original store (oh, the memories!) is still playing a part in the race. The cyclists blasted away from the starting line in Colorado Springs on August 22 on their 500-mile journey through Colorado and will hit Denver on Sunday, August 28, for the final stage, riding along West 29th Avenue, south on Speer Boulevard and then on to 13th Avenue, where they'll pass the very first Quiznos store — which went into business at 1275 Grant Street way back in 1981 — before ending with six loops around Civic Center Park.

The original Quiznos location is marked by a sign noting this august history, and these days Quiznos executives may be wishing they could go back in time, since the privately owned company has faced some financial challenges lately (losing the naming rights to the race probably the least of them) and could be headed for bankruptcy or reorganization, according to some news reports.

While the race is sure to raise some hackles in downtown Denver, where streets will be closed this weekend, it's already raised eyebrows in Aspen. That's where artist Lee Mulcahy is using his entry in the town's salute to the Cycling Challenge to continue his long-running wage war against his former employer, Aspen's Skico (which operates Snowmass). Mulcahy was fired by the company in February — because he tried to create a ski instructors' union, he says. To make matters worse, Mulcahy was also banned from the resort entirely.

So when an opportunity arose last month to create a bicycle-based sculpture related to the race, which will roll through Aspen mid-week, he submitted a life-sized diptych of Skico owners James Crown and Paula Crown, the latter of whom is adorned with a fur cuff and accompanied by a Barbie doll. How is the piece related to cycling? Well, Mulcahy crammed an old mountain bike through the center. After some tense moments, the city of Aspen chose not to take down the sculpture in deference to the First Amendment; officials did, however, move it to a considerably less conspicuous location, Mulcahy tells Westword's Jef Otte.

Want more on the bicycle brouhaha? Look for it at showandtell.com, where we'll continue to spin our wheels over Quiznos and the USA Pro Cycling Challenge this week.

 

All wet: Denver's Garland Park already has one lake. But a man who is familiar with the park, which runs along Cherry Creek Drive North between Holly Street and Monaco Parkway, insists that a pipe leading to a new restroom there has created a second one. "It's creating a new marshland," he says. "It's amazing. It's brought with it lots of mosquitos and gnats. I've complained to the Parks Department and the mayor's office, but nothing has been done yet, and it gets worse every day."

But with any luck, the day is coming when concerns over this second lake will dry up. "Our staff discovered an irrigation leak that was located approximately 350 feet north of the new restroom," says Denver Parks spokeswoman Kathy Maloney Green. The cracked pipe, which is located near the edge of the park on Mississippi Street, was dug up on August 18 and should be repaired this week. "We weren't able to identify a specific reason for the failure," she adds. "The contractor dug up the pipe at no charge, the repair materials will cost approximately $200, and the labor charge for Parks will be about $120."

It's been a rough summer all around at Garland Park, which is popular with walkers, bird watchers and volleyball players. In July, several dozen ducks died at the park and were floating around in the lake until authorities collected them. The city blamed an outbreak of botulism for the dead ducks.

 
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1 comments
gary
gary

Quiznos died the day they stopped serving meatball subs.

 
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