Unquestionably, the team from Tryba Architects has provided History Colorado with an ideal seat from which to promote the state and its heritage. So what has the institution done with the enormous exhibition spaces Tryba provided? Well, setting aside the still-unfinished 10,000-square-foot space upstairs that will be used for special exhibitions, and the lower-level gallery that's not yet fitted out, there are two gigantic sets of spaces for exhibits — nearly 15,000 square feet combined — on the first and second floors that have been installed with shows.

The first, just off the atrium, is Destination Colorado, showcasing the utterly unremarkable and now-long-gone farming town of Keota. Under normal circumstances, I wouldn't even mention a show with as little appeal as this one has, except that I'm forced to because a part of it — what looks like a Tuff Shed — intrudes into the otherwise meticulously defined atrium. It's so incredibly wrong that I can't believe the idea of putting it there ever got out of a brainstorming session. The clapboard structure is meant to conjure up Keota's train station, but doesn't. The folksy country character of the phony train station recalls the ambience of a Black-eyed Pea restaurant. And its presence assaults the atrium, violating its floor plate and its volume. I don't need to tell you how confrontational this clunky structure is when it collides with the careful Tryba detailing. It even blocks the view of the stair tower. It's a disgrace and should be torn down immediately and reconfigured so that it's within the gallery and not bulging out of it.

The other show, Colorado Stories, purports to "examine Colorado communities from the 1300s to the present," and although it's slightly more sophisticated than Destination Colorado, it shares the same dumbed-down spirit.

Blame for both needs to be put at the feet of History Colorado chief operating officer Kathryn Hill, who gave me a tour of the exhibits and who is aware of my opinion. She revealed herself to be part of what I would label a cult in the art-education realm; rather than trying to elevate the discussion, members of that cult consult interviews, surveys, charts, graphs and focus groups in order to arrive at the lowest common denominator for exhibits. I call these techniques "voodoo metrics" because, despite the fact that employing them doesn't appear to attract visitors, they are still embraced by many institutions across the country.

Hill needs to hire a curator to put together a significant feature, something like The Rockies: Bierstadt to Christo, or Rocky Flats: Or How I Learned to Hate the Bomb. You know — a blockbuster that would make national waves and for which all the material is accessible in collections right here in town, including in History Colorado's own hoard!Until then, let's focus instead on what a gift David Tryba has given the state with the breathtaking neo-modernist History Colorado Center.

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8 comments
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Barry
Barry

I realize I'm judging the museum without seeing it, but I haven't heard anything that gives me any hope this will be anything but another wasted opportunity.

I agree with Guest #1 about the open atrium. It may look nice, but what about exhibit space? Ryan Warner had an interview on Colorado Matters recently with Kathryn Hill about the museum and its exhibits. She blathered on about how everything was going to be about "people's stories". Well, people and their stories are *part* of history, of course, but it sounds like they have no intention of displaying or building exhibits around the artifacts they have in their collection.

People who want to learn about Colorado's history are told they can go to the research library and look things up for themselves. Meanwhile, why don't the rest of you line up to try our virtual reality ski jump? Really? How does standing in line to play an arcade game have anything to do with "history"?

The "time machine" roll-around-and-try-to-find-some-video-hotspots-on-our-big-giant-map doohicket sounds horrendous. So...I won't be able to go to any exhibit and maybe learn something about our state. No, I'll have to wrest a time machine away from some other museum patrons and go spelunking for histo-tainment? Come on. What a stupid idea.

Oh, and I guess that big giant floor map is a primary permanent exhibit. Good thing, because I sure can't find maps of Colorado anywhere. (History!) And, since it fills a big chunk of the atrium floor, that floorspace is unusable for anything else. Better hope it doesn't get busy, or you'll miss the show.

Big, empty spaces filled with occasional infotainment. Welcome to Colorful Colorado!

calhounp
calhounp

i'd like to publish some of these comments in our print edition, ideally with your full name/town. If that's okay, e-mail me at patricia.calhoun@westword.com

Debbie
Debbie

How sad the review of the new museum leads one to believe exhibits will not improve from the old museum. I was amazed to see the former musem had not addressed the Hispanic population of Colorado and its rich heritage. Wonder whom is on the board???? Come on folks, we live in a very multicultural state with incredible history - finally, let's get with it!!!!

Karen
Karen

Yikes, is this a marketing promo for David Tryba or what? Who paid Paglia to write this? It's so sappy and sweet, filled with superlatives, that it can't be taken seriously. Too bad. Next time try to write a real critique, Westword, not a advertorial.

guest
guest

#1 - if you look at the historic photos of the Keota and Grover Depots, they really aren't similar.#2 - The grants program is paying the interest on the Certificates of Participation for the History Center, not Judicial#3 - I totally agree about the parking garage ... really.

Zamora Carl
Zamora Carl

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Guest #1
Guest #1

Michael Paglia's comments on the new History Colorado Center's exhibits are unnecessarily harsh and cruel. With the state is such a budget crisis, I am surprised any new museum was built at all and can only chalk it up to the fact that the judges and lawyers over at the new State Judicial Building must have a lot of power to not only get their new massive structure (Ralph Carr Justice Center and Monument to State Government), but also use one third of the History Colorado Center's land area for their new Judicial Parking Garage. (I'd rather have seen the parking garage money be used for the state capitol dome, but I digress) From my perspective, it looks like they (the Judicial folks) kicked the Colorado History Museum off of their old site and then only gave them $110 million to build a new structure. While this sounds like a lot of money, it is evident that David Owen Tryba had to cut corners in order to get any building constructed. The new airy atrium must be nice I'm sure but by not having to build actual floor space, air ducts, lighting, etc., across where the atrium now is, think about all of the money saved on four "open" floors. We paid $110 million for a nice view. That also reduces the amount of space for employees, the public, historical society collections, and exhibits. To spend $110 million and only increase the size from the old museum by 50,000 sf and not even have a parking garage that can be used by the museum---I'm frankly stunned. However, the fact that anything was built at all should really be commended. If that means having exhibits "intrude" into Michael Paglia's sacred atrium because there's not enough space elsewhere in the museum, so be it. The building was not constructed to benefit the huge ego of David Owen Tryba--a so-called monument to him--no, this is a museum first as I see it, an architectural "wonder" second (and that is questionable). As for the accuracy of exhibits, or lack thereof, Michael Paglia should trust more in the museum staff and history experts--this is their job. If they say a train station looked like the train station they are showing, I think they should be given the benefit of the doubt. They are hardly going to spend this much time and money on exhibits and a new building only to put out information that hasn't been thoroughly researched. And for the record, I have seen the depot in Grover, near Keota, and it looks almost the same as what the museum is showing so I can at least know that the museum researchers are not somewhere in left field. I know "critics" are just doing their job when they comment on matters such as these, but the unusually cruel invective used by Michael Paglia cannot be allowed to go unchallenged.

Anon
Anon

THANK YOU. I have to look at that ugly and historically inaccurate ( where in Colorado is there a depot with a slate roof?) intrusion into the otherwise lovely atrium almost ever day.

 
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