Corrigan is a Denver-based conceptual artist who works with neo-pop and neo-dada ideas. Though he's interested in installation and new media, the work at Walker mostly comprises paintings — that old fine-art standby. Many of the paintings feature photo-transfers of found images, such as newspaper ads and photos. A few concern Corrigan's travels, others the culture at large. That's the case with the diptych "Unlimited Cash," an oil-and-silkscreen on canvas that indicts the art market. Corrigan has replicated a print advertisement in which a company offers to purchase pieces by major artists; in it, he reduces the fine arts to their grossest level: money. Other standouts among the Corrigans include "Blow Yourself" (not what you think) and "Chelsea."

The sculptures and wall-relief pieces by Castator exemplify classic modernism with a minimalist tilt. They look great with the Corrigans — come to think of it, they'd look great anywhere — but it's clear the two artists have nothing in common, despite that fantasy of their thus-far-unrealized collaboration.

Castator, who lives in Boulder, works in metal, and these recent creations are both distinctly different from what he has been doing over the past several years and obviously something of a continuation of the same ideas, particularly those involving soaring vertical shafts that recall spires or stiles. For these works, Castator begins with sheets of metal, either stainless steel or copper, and crinkles them so that they have surfaces reminiscent of rocks — though he's done it so they somehow keep their shiny finishes. In their simplest iterations, Castator displays these smashed sheets just as they are, hanging them on the wall as bas-relief works. In others — the vertical, free-standing pieces — he bends the sheets and then welds them together to form the columnar shapes he's known for. They're really elegant, managing to simultaneously be expressive and aloof.

Detail of "Absence," by Jane McMahan, mixed materials. See more images: Photos: Stay cool at summer shows at Ice Cube, Walker Fine Art
Detail of "Absence," by Jane McMahan, mixed materials. See more images: Photos: Stay cool at summer shows at Ice Cube, Walker Fine Art
"Unlimited Cash," by Eric Corrigan, oil and silkscreen on canvas. See more images: Photos: Stay cool at summer shows at Ice Cube, Walker Fine Art
"Unlimited Cash," by Eric Corrigan, oil and silkscreen on canvas. See more images: Photos: Stay cool at summer shows at Ice Cube, Walker Fine Art

Location Info

Map

Ice Cube Gallery

3320 Walnut St.
Denver, CO 80205

Category: Art Galleries

Region: Downtown Denver

Walker Fine Art

300 W. 11th Ave.
Denver, CO 80204

Category: Art Galleries

Region: Central Denver

Details

Through July 14, Ice Cube Gallery, 3320 Walnut Street, 303-292-1822, icecubegallery.com.Through July 28, Walker Fine Art, 300 West 11th Avenue, #A, www.walkerfineart.com, 303-355-8955.

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Cool shows alone aren't enough to beat the heat, of course. But shows as cool as these in air-conditioned galleries like Ice Cube and Walker? Unbeatable.

See more images: Photos: Stay cool at summer shows at Ice Cube, Walker Fine Art

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