Stephen Ludwig is paying for his position in shoe leather...or at least tire tread

Stephen Ludwig, a member of the University of Colorado's Board of Regents who is running to retain his spot, plans to campaign in 6.4 counties on Saturday and another 6.4 on Sunday. Well, maybe not exactly 6.4, but Ludwig, a Denver Democrat, does plan to roll through all 64 counties in Colorado over a ten-day period.

"It's a lot of driving. Some of the stops might just be honk-and-waves," says Ludwig's campaign manager, Adrian Miller, adding that it took about five hours just to plan the route. (First-day stops: Douglas, Arapahoe, Jefferson, Denver, Adams, Weld and Morgan counties.)

"We're doing it because one of the challenges of this race is that a lot of people don't know what the regents are and what they do. A lot don't even know that they can vote for regent," Miller says.

The nine-member board is charged with CU's general supervision and financial management. One person is elected from each of Colorado's congressional districts, and two represent the state as a whole. Ludwig is running for his second term as one of those at-large regents against the Republican candidate, Brian Davidson, whom he beat last time.

"We want to raise the profile of the race," Miller says.

Of course, Ludwig got some help on that front in June from Davidson's GOP primary challenger, Matt Arnold — but not in a good way.

As the primary heated up, Arnold posted Davidson's address and phone number online, saying he was angry that some Davidson supporters had called Arnold's backers and urged them to drop their endorsements. And Arnold, who runs Clear the Bench, which tries to knock "activist" judges out of office, reportedly didn't stop there: He posted the addresses and phone numbers for three Davidson supporters, including 76-year-old former CU regent Norwood Robb, who called the police. Arnold pulled the info off his website after he was contacted by the Arapahoe County Sheriff's Office.

Ludwig is definitely keeping things more relaxed. This week he'll also release a series of web-only ads that spoof typical political culture and election-season campaigns. He did a similar thing six years ago with (poor-quality but amusing) video spots in which he practices walking in a parade and complimenting babies, listens to a team of pompous political consultants, stands in an open field, and pretends to do "normal things" like drink coffee, even though he doesn't really like coffee.

In the final ad, scrolling words give the history of both then-Denver mayor John Hickenlooper and secretary of state candidate Ken Gordon, who famously jumped out of airplanes to get their political messages across. The ad shows Ludwig hanging from a parachute stuck in a tree.

"This was a crappy idea!" he shouts. "Someone get me down!"

But that spoof doesn't appear to have hurt Hickenlooper's feelings. Last week, the governor endorsed Ludwig, calling him "a proven leader who knows how to work with people to get things done."

Whoever gets elected will certainly have a lot to get done — whether it's dealing with the recently implemented policies over guns on campus or the investigation into whether CU knew accused Aurora shooter James Holmes was a threat weeks before he was arrested.

Scene and herd: When Tim Tebow joined the Denver Broncos in 2010 and was assigned the now-famous number 15, that number sold more jerseys than any other for many months. But a few economical fans came up with a cost-saving idea: Rather than buy new orange duds, they could simply pull off the name of Brandon Marshall — a star in his own right who'd previously been assigned number 15 — and replace it with the Chosen One's.

But that's not going to work this year. In June, the Broncos assigned 15 to Mark Dell, an undrafted wide receiver who'd been cut by the Broncos in 2011 (he wore 83 then) but was hoping to make the team this year. On Monday, though, the team cut him again.

Looks like 15 will be retired in Denver — at least this year.

 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
 
Loading...