JOLT

Jolt is the owner of GuerillaGarden Studios, the creator of Colorado's largest public art mural (at 1099 Osage) and inventor of Colorado's most recognizable icon in the street realm: the GuerillaGorilla.

Who is doing the most interesting work in Denver right now? I really like Leon Art Gallery; every show that they put on is on point. They seem to be in touch with a wide variety of artists who are defining their own style and approach.

When you go out, what's your favorite cultural activity? First I grab my backpack with my sketch pad, GG Stickers and camera, get on my bike and cruise to Bud Med in Edgewater to grab an eighth of Durbain Poison and head downtown to eat, usually at Sushi Sasa, Pho or Euclid Hall. After dinner I like to check out what shows Beauty Bar is having, or I check for DJs like Musa, GypDaHip and Ginger Perry. Nights in the clubs usually lead to rooftop after-hours parties at the GuerillaGarden Art Studios.

What's the one thing you'd like to see happen to improve the local scene? People taking more chances at doing new things — more breaking of the rules, warehouse events and venues that have been previously unused. More of a mesh of the things that Denver has to offer. Themed shows, less jocking whatever was in Juxtapoz magazine ten years ago, more celebrating what's happening here and now.

EDIE WINOGRADE

Edie Winograde is a nationally recognized artist/photographer represented by Robischon Gallery. Her work is featured in Continental Drift, which is moving from the Museum of Contemporary Art Denver to the Aspen Art Museum on October 19.

Who is doing the most interesting work in Denver right now? The new Colorado Photographic Arts Center has been keeping its finger on the pulse of contemporary photography, inviting guest curators who are bringing in emerging and established artists and really invigorating the photographic art scene in Denver with innovative lectures and events. The fall show Lost and Found features documentary work by Matt Eich and Matt Slaby, two very respected agency photographers. This is guest-curated by Kate Donaldson, who works at DU's Myhren Gallery. Also coming up are an exhibition of emerging artist Vivian Keulards and a multidisciplinary group exhibition about light curated by Denver artist/photographer Conor King. When you go out, what's your favorite cultural activity? I enjoy going around to see art exhibitions of all kinds at various galleries, art spaces and museums. There is usually a nice mix of local, national and international work on view. The Denver Art Museum's photography exhibitions are always a destination for me.

What's the one thing you'd like to see happen to improve the local scene? It would be great to see more non-profit organizations and businesses supporting the work of local artists in any way they can. Denver has a very robust art scene, and there is a fair amount of support out there, but artists always need affordable studio space, equipment rentals and service bureaus, as well as grants, commissions and exhibition opportunities to keep doing their work and enriching our cultural environment.

KRISTIN RUST

Kristin Rust, spokeswoman for Arts & Venues Denver, is a native who thought Denver was cool back in the Dynasty days. Now it actually is cool.

Who is doing the most interesting work in Denver right now? I am a huge fan of the Denver Art Museum. They consistently have something to offer that I didn't know would excite me.

When you go out, what's your favorite cultural activity? As a Denver native, I like to be introduced to parts of town, events, restaurants and people that I'm not familiar with. So if I notice something that's off the beaten path, I'm in. And I love the theater. Some incredible stuff comes through our town.

What's the one thing you'd like to see happen to improve the local scene? I really enjoy interactive anything. Anything that gets me personally involved with the art or happening is fun and memorable.

JIMMY SELLARS

MasterMind Jimmy Sellars is an artist, educator, gallerist and consultant who enjoys the creative process from theory to market.

Who is doing the most interesting work in Denver right now? For the first time since 1990, the art scene is becoming part of a younger scene, which is awesome. These "kids" are creating the scene every day and really starting to make it their own without the intimidation that is typically felt.

What's the one thing you'd like to see happen to improve the local scene? As much as I love what DOCA/Arts & Venues has done, I'd love for them to get their grubby hands off of our scene. They have been shaping it for far too long for their own gain — not really helping cultivate talent and creativity or really filtering any actual funds into the scene, just trying to meet quotas to keep their own jobs and look busy. Cultural tourism is huge, and Denver is now — finally — on that map. We need a more collected front to show the world and each other what we have instead of this compartmentalized approach. There needs to be more visual cues that there is as much art here as there is. I go to Vancouver, S.F., L.A., N.Y., etc., and you can see that there is art there...not just two or three sculptures here and there. I like what the Theatre District has been doing: a very cool, Times Square approach.

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1 comments
popeye12345
popeye12345 like.author.displayName 1 Like

Don't show artwork at Forest Room 5. I had pieces in there years ago for a special show and they lost half of them. There staff didn't seem to care either. Avoid St. Mark's Coffeehouse as well to hang art. Their baristas are rude basically throw your art in the trash.

 
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