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The rest of the country was soon swept up in the racist reefer madness that had already grabbed the Southwest. The federal government passed the Marijuana Tax Act in 1937, making marijuana use and cultivation without a license a crime; however, the government never issued such a license. Just three years earlier, the 1934 Uniform State and Narcotic Drug Act regulating medical narcotics had included cannabis as a legal drug, and any violations involving it were considered misdemeanors.

No more.

*********

By the 1960s, Hispanics were no longer the primary focus of local enforcement of marijuana laws. The hippies had arrived. The newspapers were full of stories about hippies busted with marijuana plants in their back yard and columns that made it clear that their authors thought hippies deserved to rot in jail over possession of a plant.

But public opinion was shifting. In 1968, the News reported that 67 percent of Colorado College students favored legalization of marijuana. The University of Colorado was another stoner-friendly school; in a March 29, 1965, article, a News reporter revealed his shock at how much marijuana was available on the campus and how many students were using it. By 1970, legislators and a few progressive lawmen were arguing for lowering the penalties on cannabis possession and use, and that August, recreational possession was downgraded from a felony to a misdemeanor. Later that year, Hunter S. Thompson ran for sheriff of Pitkin County on a complete drug-decriminalization platform — and nearly won.

The cannabis climate had clearly become more friendly by 1973, when legislator Michael Strang, a Carbondale Republican, introduced the first re-legalization effort in Colorado history. The bill would have made possession and use of marijuana legal for anyone eighteen or older. "Our society has decided it wants to use this stuff, regardless of the risk," he said. Strang's bill would have created licenses for growers, wholesalers and retailers, and put a $6-per-ounce tax on any marijuana sold; at the time, the going rate for an ounce was about $15.

Although Strang's proposal never passed out of committee, Oregon reduced the penalties for marijuana possession that year. And in 1975, the Colorado Legislature followed suit, decriminalizing possession, transportation and private use of marijuana; possessing up to an ounce of the stuff was made a petty offense, with a maximum fine of $100. (That amount was increased to two ounces in 2010, still with a maximum fine of $100 and the potential for fifteen days in jail for things like smoking in public. And sale to anyone can still net up to fourteen years in state prison.)

Colorado's first medical marijuana bill, dubbed the "Dangerous Drugs Therapeutic Research Act," was introduced in 1979 and signed into law by Governor Dick Lamm; it allowed cancer and glaucoma patients to use medical marijuana. Doctors had to prescribe the drug, and patients were to pick up their meds at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver — but there was a hitch. The program was dependent on federal government approval, which never came. Lamm signed another bill, called "Therapeutic Use of Cannabis," in 1981; this time, patients were to obtain their pot from the feds. They're still waiting.

The sponsor of that bill, then-Representative John Herzog of Colorado Springs, says the goal was to expand the program created in 1979 to twelve hospitals around the state, which would all be able to offer cannabis to cancer patients. He recalls that the measure received a surprising amount of support from fellow legislators; the minimal opposition came mostly from local PTAs. Although the expanded program even got a nod from the National Institutes of Health, it never took off. That's because in October 1970, the federal government had classified marijuana as a Schedule 1 controlled substance with no therapeutic value — a status it officially retains today.

In 1996, California voters approved Proposition 215, allowing the use and cultivation (and sale, some argue) of medical marijuana. That got the ball rolling in Colorado, and proponents of MMJ pushed Amendment 19 onto the ballot in 1998. But then-Secretary of State Vikki Buckley refused to count the votes, saying that the measure did not have the proper number of signatures to get on the ballot in the first place. Those proponents tried again, though, and in 2000, Coloradans approved Amendment 20, which made this the only state to legalize medical marijuana in its constitution.

The amendment permitted medical marijuana use for people with chronic weight loss, muscle spasms, seizures, severe pain and severe nausea; caretakers were to "dispense" this medicine after doctors had prescribed it. The program went online in June 2001, despite warnings from then-Attorney General Ken Salazar that any doctors who issued such prescriptions could face federal charges. (While some doctors have faced state sanctions in recent years, none have been prosecuted federally for prescribing pot.)

While the medical marijuana industry was evolving, activists continued to push for recreational use of marijuana. In 2005, Mason Tvert's newly founded Safer Alternatives to Recreational Enjoyment pushed — and passed — resolutions at Colorado State University and CU demanding that cannabis penalties be no worse than penalties for alcohol offenses on campus. That same year, SAFER put a measure on the Denver ballot that would decriminalize possession of up to an ounce of marijuana by anyone over the age of twenty. When Denver voters approved the proposal, the Mile High City became the first major city in the country to make such a move — even though it was mostly symbolic and simply reinforced the state's 1975 decriminalization laws.

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120 comments
homersimpson
homersimpson

i can't believe it's not butter and cookie dough.

IcePick
IcePick

I'm gonna call it, Aaron... it's just you and me here....

 

Obama wins the Presidency and A64 wins too.

 

Congratulations.

IcePick
IcePick

Who is Donkey Hotay? 

 

Here's the answer:

 

Donkey Hotay  [ Show all posts ]

Email:asawyer@us.ibm.com

Real Name:Aaron (Sawyer)

Posts: 1,396

Registered: 12/19/2005 06:25PM

Last Activity: 11/28/2007 05:38PM 

 

And to see proof that this is the same Donkey Hotay, here are the highlights:

1) he works at IBM, who has a plant in Boulder on Diagonal Blvd

2) he is a rockies fan

3) he writes like a lawyer 

 

Read his posts for yourself, you will quickly see that Aaron Sawyer IS Donkey Hotay. 

 

Profile:

http://forums.macresource.com/profile.php?1,404 

 

Forum Posts in the "  'Friendly' Political Ranting" section:

http://forums.macresource.com/search.php?1,author=404,match_type=USER_ID 

 

Here are posts from another forum by Aaron "the idiot Donkey Hotay" Sawyer:http://tinyurl.com/cldyphk

wstott
wstott

Who would expect a  journalism award quality article from the pot columnist of a free weekly. Could this be journalism? There is that word again! Breathes give us the Information and background, overviews of the stakeholders, and the story as of today, The reader comes away better informed and with more depth. This is the job of journalists. The malleable message of the 30 second sound bite and the two minute news story does not an informed electorate make. We need every issue covered this way. How good is this article? If you are pro or con on the issue, you still come away with facts and history to defend your position.   

patricia.calhoun
patricia.calhoun moderator editor

just a reminder that we'd love to publish some of these comments in our print letters to the editor section....ideally with the author's real name/town (we don't publish e-mail addresses). Or feel free to submit a fresh letter to patricia.calhoun@westword.

 

C'mon,  Kevin, Ice pick, weib999x -- and dare I say it, donkeyhotay? Any takers?

kevin_hunt
kevin_hunt

 @patricia.calhoun Patricia, it's obvious that the presence of the Donkey increases site traffic, because arguing with them is addictive.

 

What do you think of the Donkey's debate style?

kevin_hunt
kevin_hunt

 @patricia.calhoun When you get donkeyhotay to reveal their real name, please let us know.  That is currently the $10,000 question.

IcePick
IcePick

 @DonkeyHotay  @nemopunk15 

"Gotta love R Lee Ermey"  Yea, you know who he reminds me of? Aaron Sawyer, though Ermey appears much smarter.

patricia.calhoun
patricia.calhoun moderator editor

 @DonkeyHotayThe value of a person willing to sign his/her real name to an opinion is priceless...still, readers do it every day, and I encourage anyone willing to stand up for his/her thoughts to do so!

kevin_hunt
kevin_hunt

@IcePick

Could it be too good to be true?  I don't want to jinx it.

 

 

The Rocky Mountain High just got a whole lot higher. On Tuesday night, Amendment 64 -- the measure which sought the legalization of marijuana for recreational use by adults -- was passed by Colorado voters, making Colorado the first state to end marijuana prohibition in the United States.

With about 36 percent of precincts reporting at the time of publishing, 9News and Fox31 report that Amendment 64 has passed.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/06/amendment-64-passes-in-co_n_2079899.html?utm_source=Alert-blogger&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Email%2BNotifications

 

kevin_hunt
kevin_hunt

 @IcePick Donkey = a Continuation of Criminal Prohibition against Marijuana Users and Growers and an endorsement of Reefer Madness hysteria regarding the HARMS and DANGERS of marijuana.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

 @IcePick You're lying again, scumbag. Pay attention. Look it up.

IcePick
IcePick

 @DonkeyHotay You didn't answer.  Where did you answer?  What was the answer?  

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

 @IcePick  -- asked and answered you pig-ignorant drooling retard.

IcePick
IcePick

 @DonkeyHotay 

You know damn well you who are, Aaron Sawyer... employee of IBM.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

 @IcePick  Who is Aaron Sawyer and why are you so infatuated with him ?

IcePick
IcePick

 @sfsailor  @DonkeyHotay 

While he may seem to be Corey Donahue, he is not.  His name is Aaron Sawyer and he worked for a fortune 500 company in Boulder who many call 'big blue'.

sfsailor
sfsailor

 @DonkeyHotaySo you are denying you fled to avoid serving your prison sentence/s? I am the person who told you, Corey, almost years ago while we were walking near the Capital, that you have no critical thinking skills, and that I was shocked at this as you claim to have a Master's degree. hth. 

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

 @sfsailor "You are clearly Corey "Nut-tap" Donahue - the convicted sexual offender who fled to Boliva [sic] to avoid serving his jail time."

 

You = clearly a clueless imbecile

 

hth

sfsailor
sfsailor

 @DonkeyHotay  Your online name, DonkeyHotay; is a play on the way "Don Quixote"  sounds.  Your previous posts from 1-2 years ago, on Disgus, gave away your living place as near Boulder (which turned out to be your sisters apartment). Your posting as DonkeyHotay all but died out in September and October - the same time you fled to Boliva. Your postings started right back up after you where apparently (no one has checked this) granted asylum.You are clearly Corey "Nut-tap" Donahue - the convicted sexual offender who fled to Boliva to avoid serving his jail time. When you fled from America, you also forfeited all of the bonds your acquaintances had to put up to bail you out of jail all those times from your stint terrorizing the Denver Occupy movement... In the end, when you fled, the people who bailed you out must have  lost over $10k.So, Corey, what gives you the right to chime in on anything in Colorado? You fled from here physically.... And why is Westword letting you, a known, fleeing and fleecing felon have a soapbox? If WW is not going to have any standards here- what's next??? Is WW going to have a forum where pedophilies can come and taunt their victims? Seems like sound Corey Donahue style logic to me...

 

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

 @IcePick  @kevin_hunt  

 

Says the Village Idiot who's also claimed I was Laura Kriho, Kathleen Chippi, two different guys from Wyoming, and whatever current delusional nonsense he happens to entertain in his schizophrenic mind.

patricia.calhoun
patricia.calhoun moderator editor

 @DonkeyHotay irony is never lost on me. It's one of my favorite things. But the simple fact is that, unlike a food critic who can write under her real name and make reservations under a fake one, an MMJ reviewer must do the reverse: Use the real name to get into the place, and so a fake one for the reviews.

 

what's your explanation.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

 @patricia.calhoun 

 

And the irony of this on a blog written by "William Breathes" is lost on you, Patty?

 

 
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