It's clear that much of the current campaign to "activate" Auraria's edges is focused on its north side, amid the tantalizing possibilities of maximizing public-private development on the cusp of lower downtown. Still, the ballfields may well be the start of a rapprochement with the area's past. Even Alcaro says he's been impressed with the willingness of AHEC officials, and particularly Metro's Jordan, to listen to his proposals for honoring that past, even if they haven't embraced them. After one presentation, he says, Jordan asked him why he wasn't "more angry" about what had happened to his family.

Alcaro believes Auraria could benefit by increasing its historical signage and promoting "heritage tourism" on campus and in the surrounding area. He and Kalavity have proposed reducing on-site parking, launching a trolley service that could help connect the campus to its neighbors, and adding more green space and green buildings to the mix. (One pet AHEC project calls for converting the space in front of the Tivoli into a multi-purpose field that students could use for playing Frisbee or just lounging around.) They'd also like to see the college tap into some of its own expertise — programs in urban planning, design, history, archaeology and related disciplines — in shaping its future construction projects.

"This is a sacred site," Alcaro says. "We have no excuses as an academic institution not to have archaeologists and anthropologists involved in the design process."

Mayor Michael Hancock and others broke ground last month for a $65 million University of Colorado Denver building (inset) on the north side of campus.
Mayor Michael Hancock and others broke ground last month for a $65 million University of Colorado Denver building (inset) on the north side of campus.
Gregorio Alcaro, who offers tours of Ninth Street Park, views the current frenzy of development at Auraria as “a slap in the face.”
Anthony Camera
Gregorio Alcaro, who offers tours of Ninth Street Park, views the current frenzy of development at Auraria as “a slap in the face.”

It hasn't happened yet — at least, not to the degree Alcaro would like. He stands outside the Casa Mayan, looking up warily at the construction cranes that tower over what's left of the old neighborhood.

"From a real-estate perspective," he says, "all this is wasted space."

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
All
 
My Voice Nation Help
2 comments
AurariaStudent
AurariaStudent

I give daily tours for one of the colleges on this campus. I am also a student here. Talking about the St. Cajetan's and Auraria's history is always one of my favorite parts of the tour. I know that there is a lot of anger and negativity around this development, my Chicano studies professor and I would have plenty of talks about it often. However, I always try to out a different spin on it. This campus has a beautiful history and though it's gone now it should be celebrated. The history parts aren't required on the script for our tours but I include it because I love it and almost always get a positive response from prospectives. This was an awesome article and it confirmed some information I already knew (people always asked where I got the line that none of the development was supposed to go south of Colfax, I'm glad other's are saying the same) and also helped with providing some more tidbits I might work into future tours. I hope the issues on this campus can be resolved, I have enjoyed my time here and when I graduate next year, I will miss this campus for sure.

 
Loading...