Supporters of the move cite cases like that of Christakes Christou, the owner of the Funky Buddha Lounge, who originally faced a charge of attempted murder after shooting a man who'd broken into the bar after closing in 2006. The intruder pleaded guilty to trespassing; Christou pleaded guilty to tampering with evidence — he'd allegedly picked up a shell casing — and received a deferred sentence.

But Morrissey, who's twice testified against Make My Day Better bills, says he hasn't seen one yet that he could endorse. "The problem with the laws I saw was that they were all written too broadly," he says. "They would allow the shop owner to shoot the shoplifter. You have to write it so tightly to make sure that the fifteen-year-old kid stealing a Baby Ruth bar isn't blown across the 7-Eleven."

**********

Al Michaud has three locks on his door, motion detectors installed around his front and back windows, a video camera in constant use. A sign on his door informs his neighbors that THERE IS NOTHING IN HERE WORTH YOUR LIFE.

Independence Institute research director Dave Kopel says the Make My Day law hasn’t been the “parade of horribles” critics feared it would be.
Wikimedia Commons
Independence Institute research director Dave Kopel says the Make My Day law hasn’t been the “parade of horribles” critics feared it would be.
David Guenther’s shooting of three residents outside his home in 1986 helped define the limits of Make My Day.
David Guenther’s shooting of three residents outside his home in 1986 helped define the limits of Make My Day.

You might think that's enough to keep the riffraff out. Michaud doesn't. He sits with a shotgun beside him, a pistol under his arm. "I never leave my house," he says. "It's not a question of if they're going to come back again. It's a question of when."

Michaud knows the law, knows what actions Make My Day allows him to take in his own defense, and what he can't do. That's why he didn't pursue the three home invaders when they fled his apartment last January.

"I don't want to be like Dirty Harry," he says. "But I've always been kind of ready."

Preparedness has been a longtime habit. Twenty-one years ago, on a quiet street in Manchester, New Hampshire, Alfred W. "Junior" Michaud got into a hell of a brawl with Thomas "Crazy Savage" Alden. The two had been friends, neighbors and members of the same motorcycle club, but the relationship had gone sour. According to news accounts, Michaud pulled a hunting knife but dropped it in the struggle, then called for his wife to bring his rifle. He shot Alden in the chest, killing him.

Michaud spent ten months in jail awaiting trial. The prosecutor talked about Michaud's duty to retreat, questioned whether he was in fear for his life, and pointed out that Alden was unarmed. Witnesses gave conflicting testimony about whether a third man pointed a gun — or was it a stick? — at Michaud and taunted him as the battle raged. The jury favored acquittal 10-2 but was unable to reach a unanimous verdict. The case was dropped.

"That's what brought me to Colorado," Michaud says.

The police seem to take a long time to respond to 911 calls in Michaud's neighborhood. They still haven't arrested anyone for the first burglary he suffered last summer, even after Michaud evicted the prime suspect and found his laptop in the perp's apartment when he was cleaning the place. Even after other tenants told him the dude was trying to sell the gun he stole. Michaud's gun.

"To this day they still haven't arrested that guy," Michaud says. "They're all having doughnuts and coffee someplace. They're going to wait until the gun shows up in another home invasion and probably someone gets killed because they can't do their job."

No, Michaud doesn't feel any safer these days. There are still burglaries in the neighborhood. People are still getting hurt. The situation calls for constant vigilance — more so now, perhaps, than before the three men went ahead and made his day six months ago.

"They thought they were just gonna run in on me and beat me up and do whatever they were gonna do," he says. "They obviously didn't know who they were screwing with. And since it happened, just about everybody's armed over here."

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84 comments
marcy
marcy

I have no problem determining that my television is worth more than the life of some scumbag who breaks into my house to steal it.



Stephan Reuchlein
Stephan Reuchlein

Call them and they will tell you the same... ATFDenver I Field Office Group Supervisor 950 17th Street, Suite 1700 Denver, Colorado 80202 USA Voice (303) 575-7690 Fax (303) 575-7691

Stephan Reuchlein
Stephan Reuchlein

No, no law directly refers to A64 and removes your right to 2A, however, gun ownership and purchase is FEDERALLY regulated and you cannot own or purchase a firearm if you use drugs scheduled by the federal government of which marijuana is one. It is not that difficult to understand. It has and always will be prohibited if you use drugs that the federal government lists as a scheduled drug. Colorado does not have its own ownership regulations pertaining to firearms. It is ILLEGAL for medical marijuana users AND recreational marijuana users to purchase and own a firearm. If someone comes to the state to purchase marijuana and they live in another state, they still cannot own or purchase a firearm since it is federally regulated.

Stephan Reuchlein
Stephan Reuchlein

A moronic troll needs hooked on phonics to understand this post. My point is that we should publicize any expansion of the law as much as we have been inundated with the Zimmerman trial by the media. Troll started arguing the finer points of the trial of which the troll was wrong anyway since the troll has taken all liberal media reports as facts.

Stephan Reuchlein
Stephan Reuchlein

Yes, it should be expanded and publicized to the same extent as the Zimmerman trial. People intent on breaking the law when in someone else's domain need to know there is more than their freedom at risk. I would not condone use of deadly force on anyone fleeing though.

Stephan Reuchlein
Stephan Reuchlein

And since you can't understand my post, the reason Zimmerman was mentioned was in regard to publicizing any expansion of the law as much as the trial had been publicized you idiot.

Stephan Reuchlein
Stephan Reuchlein

And since you can't understand my post, the reason Zimmerman was mentioned was in regard to publicizing any expansion of the law as much as the trial had been publicized you fucking idiot.

Stephan Reuchlein
Stephan Reuchlein

Your comprehension is at a 2nd grade level since you can't understand my post. Go back to trolling, you are the moron with your response to something that wasn't expounded upon. A jury has made the call so build a bridge...Zimmerman's domain according to Florida state law is wherever he has a legal right to be and no evidence was presented to say otherwise. Get off the drugs and get into reality.

woodsnake4462838
woodsnake4462838

I still don't understand where people come up with the idea that it is somehow a morally superior point of view, to be a VICTIM OF A VIOLENT CRIME.  Rape, theft, larceny are all against the law. Citizens  that abide by the laws have the right to own their own wealth, and be secure on their property, or in their dwellings. The police are not charged with, or capable of being present at every law breaking event in the area. (city, county, block, pick a place) An armed society is a polite society! I guess it goes back to child rearing. Discipline, fear of reprisals and consequences appear to be a thing of the past. In a world where every one is a winner, it makes sense that no one else has the right to privacy, or to be successful!

Juan_Leg
Juan_Leg

I compared many states 'right to defend oneself' w/ that of Florida's, 'Make my day', & I have not been able to come up w/ much of a difference ....

patricia.calhoun
patricia.calhoun moderator editortopcommenter

I'd like to publish some of these comments in our letters to the editor section, ideally with the author's full name. if that's okay, e-mail me at patricia.calhoun@westword.com.

Mark897
Mark897

The logical, and essential, premise of "Make My Day" laws (an extension of common law or statutory principles governing trespass or breaking and entering) is that only a limited number of people, such as family members or police armed with a warrant, may lawfully enter someone's home without express permission.

The obvious problem with extending the "Make My Day" defense to businesses is that the public is not only welcome, but actively encouraged, to enter most businesses.

As "business invitees", their entry into and presence in the business is completely lawful. It therefore becomes much more difficult to distinguish between those who are "fair game" (such as those who attempt to rob a store or bank with a weapon) and those whose actions, even if unlawful, do not justify the use of deadly force.

It would therefore seem that current law, which already, in accordance with traditional "self-defense" standards, permits business owners to use deadly force to defend themselves against an imminent threat of great bodily injury or death (especially with benefit of surveillance video) sufficiently protects businesses.

Of course, my perspective is undoubtedly influenced by the fact I do not operate a medical marijuana or liquor store. :) 

Moreover, there can be no denying that extending "Make My Day" laws to retail businesses might significantly stem the horrendous plague of shoplifting to which retailers are subject, and thereby reduce the "tax" they in turn must impose on law-abiding citizens to cover their "shrinkage".

Against this benefit one must weigh the dangers of a crazed "Soup Nazi", or chef enraged by a complaint about his sole meuniere, getting the drop on a hapless diner.

tahosa65
tahosa65

Fuck em. Break into my home, die. Simple as that. I don't really care what anyone else thinks about it and make my day law or no, I would react in exactly the same way. I am tired of the punks, thieves and miscreants getting all the breaks. They want to show how tough and mean they are? Tell that to Mr. Smith and Mr. Wesson. Tough guys aren't tough with a bullet in them. My personal favorite is Mr. Colt. 

vx951
vx951

It is a good law.  people need to be able to protect themselves with out fear of son prosecutor charging them.  Most do not realize the the prosecution has no duty to pay the successful defendant's legal fees which can run into 7 or more figures.  For real criminals that is no a consideration but for the rest of the population it is.  

  Now to over turn the ignorance of the last set of ant-gun legislation.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

Remember ... Cowards Shoot First

Ipso facto.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@marcy ... spoken like the vile amoral cunt that you are.


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Stephan Reuchlein ... additionally, possession of a Firearm while committing Drug crimes is a separate Federal Offense, which ads a 5 year MINIMUM MANDATORY prison sentence -- consecutive -- to the drug sentence.


DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Stephan Reuchlein "People intent on breaking the law when in someone else's domain need to know there is more than their freedom at risk"

Apply that to the Zionist Pigs who occupy Palestinian Homelands.


Mark897
Mark897

@Juan_Leg

Hi, Juan: The essential difference is that "make my day" laws extend the common law "castle doctrine" to the use of deadly force against someone unlawfully in your home, regardless of whether the intruder is threatening you with imminent death or serious bodily injury (whereas reasonable perception of an imminent threat of death or serious bodily injury is normally required to support a claim of self-defense outside the home).

So, under "make my day" laws, the homeowner or lawful resident is presumed to be entitled to shoot a burglar or other unlawful intruder without proving the intruder was a physical threat.

Prior to the advent of "make my day" laws, lawful residents had to prove a self-defense claim (reasonably perceived threat of death or seriously bodily injury) if they killed a burglar or other unlawful intruder.

Once "make my day" laws were passed, burglars or other unlawful intruders were on notice that merely entering someone's home could get them killed, whether or not they were armed or threatening the homeowner.

Advocates of "make my day" laws contend they help reduce the rate of burglary, though the evidence is clouded by improved police techniques and increased incarceration rates.

They have very occasionally been exploited (often unsuccessfully) by those bearing a grudge or seeking to eliminate competition (for a lover, in the drug business, etc.) to invite a victim into one's "castle" on false pretenses for the purpose of murdering him or her. 

They have also protected numerous homeowners or residents from unjust prosecution by law enforcement (who don't like citizens taking care of business for them) for blowing away an intruder.

On balance, the benefits of such laws, in my judgment, greatly outweigh their undeniable potential for abuse.

Perhaps the most effective means of reducing burglaries and thefts is to reduce drug  addiction, which is the motivation of a huge proportion of property crimes.

One approach is Singapore's, which is death after show trial for the possession of controlled substances.

Another is that attempted by some European countries, which is legalization, even to the extent of supplying addicts with needles and drugs, coupled with intensive counseling/treatment, etc., etc.

Neither is ideal, but either would be better than our current system, which helps sustain huge demand for illegal drugs and restricts supply just enough to keep the profits very high for the domestic and foreign cartels that control the trade. 

That is, given the billions in profits to domestic and foreign cartels (we only hear about the foreign ones, though it should be obvious they could not transport or sell their product without the assistance of very powerful domestic cartels) that can then be profitably laundered through banks, restaurants, real estate developments and other apparently legitimate businesses, a lot of money is thrown at politicians to persuade them to maintain the status quo.  Very bad public policy, but very good for a lot of apparently legitimate businesses and corrupt pubic officials.

Here is a good summary of the origins and operation of the "castle doctrine" and "make my day" laws.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castle_doctrine

Juan_Leg
Juan_Leg

@Mark897  

Thank you for clarifying . It is still very close ....

tahosa65
tahosa65

@DonkeyHotay @tahosa65 Amoral? Homicidal? How about secure in my own home. The Constitution guarantees that. Don't want to die? Don't break into my home. Not much of a "moral" decision there. 

tahosa65
tahosa65

@CloudGang @DonkeyHotay DonkeyHotay says it all. Liberal Democrat trying to protect his "homeys." Mark me down as a "coward," just don't invade my home or I will unleash some cowardice on your dumb ass. 

adam.roy
adam.roy moderator

@Mark897 Hi Mark897, you've been nominated for our 2013 web awards as one of the best commenters of the year. Email me at adam.roy@westword.com and let us know if you can come. Thanks!

Mark897
Mark897

@Juan_Leg@Mark897

You're quite right, "Juan"; it's not always easy to understand the distinction, yet it's REALLY important to understand when confronted with an apparent intruder in one's home.

Given his apparently sociopathic outlook (reflected in his vile personal attacks, e.g., calling "marcy" a "c--t" for disagreeing with him above, one cannot help wondering whether "DonkeyHotay" finds "make my day" laws objectionable because he/she fears he/she may one night, while exploring others' homes, find him/herself the victim of its presumption of justifiable homicide.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@marcy @DonkeyHotay @Mark897 

Marcy prefers to be an amoral homicidal coward, killing other human beings over some cheap, replaceable consumerist crap.


marcy
marcy

@DonkeyHotay @Mark897 

Donkey prefers to be a victim.  Here, take my purse, here take my TV, here take my car, here take my money just please, please, please Mr Badguy please don't hurt me.

After all, it's just a terrible thing if people breaking into your house get shot and killed.  The world would be such a boring place if it ran short of burglars.

Mark897
Mark897

@DonkeyHotay @Mark897 I'm not widely regarded as being afraid of much of anything.

I have no idea who you are, but such personal attacks as a substitute for reasoned discourse are a common sign of inferior intellectual capabilities.

You should really run for office or seek judicial appointment. You have demonstrated you are very well qualified, at least in Denver.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@Mark897 "in this nihilistic age in which the probability of burglary, rape or homicide by addicts or predators is MUCH higher than it was 50+ years ago"

Nonsense. That's just your abject cowardice and fear talking.

Mark897
Mark897

@DonkeyHotay @Mark897

With respect, would it be better to expose homeowners, in this nihilistic age in which the probability of burglary, rape or homicide by addicts or predators is MUCH higher than it was 50+ years ago, to the high risk of bankruptcy and/or prison after being forced to defend themselves against a charge of murder by the very State that failed to protect them from criminals?

You may think so. I do not.

We would likely agree, however, that "make my day" laws are an inefficient means of solving the root problems that have dragged our once very safe society into the gutter, and rendered innocent citizens fair game for all manner of predators. 

Until we more forcefully attack the root problems, "make my day" laws will remain a necessary evil in a world increasingly full of evil.

Since vigilantism, though I am inclined to favor it as a means of dealing with rapists, child molesters, and meth and heroin dealers, is for good reason barred by the Constitution (at least to the extent it is perpetrated by citizens as opposed to law enforcement), we must look for other solutions, such as: giving up on the silly notion of "treatment" for sexual predators; early identification through genetic and psychological screening of addictive personalities, and intensive monitoring and treatment to steer them away from abuse; some form of legalization of all drugs, or less dangerous alternatives, coupled with VERY severe penalties (like Singapore's) for going outside lawful channels to sell or obtain them.

tahosa65
tahosa65

@azlefti @DonkeyHotay @tahosa65 You sir are correct. Calling someone a "coward" or using the one single instance of a self defense gone wrong to justify your refusal to recognize that in the real world, you are responsible for your own defense, is laughable. With or without this law, everyone has a right to self defense. It's an "unalienable," right along with "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." I would not seek out the opportunity to exercise that right. On the other hand, I would never hesitate to take another's life to protect me or mine. They make that choice when they come into my home uninvited or accost me without reason. You want to take what is mine? Be ready to give all you have in the effort. 

azlefti
azlefti

@DonkeyHotay @tahosa65 Well since we are not discussing that there is no answer, perhaps if you were to quit trying to make the  subject fit your agenda you would understand that we are discussing defense of self and family.


Funny a moron calling people cowards

CloudGang
CloudGang

@DonkeyHotay @CloudGang Once again you misunderstand me.........There is NOTHING in our home worth losing YOUR life over. You are welcome to come find out, its a free country.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@CloudGang "There is nothing in my home worth dying for....."

Your wife and children must be so proud of you ...

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@tahosa65 ... what part of the Constitution grants you homicidal powers of summary execution ?

Fire away, coward!

Man Shoots and Kills Apparent Intruder ... His Own Son!


A Connecticut man responding to an apparent break-in at 1 a.m. Thursday fatally shot a masked man in self-defense, and later learned that he had killed his 15-year-old son.


According to CBS New York, Jeffery Giuliano's sister, who lives next door, alerted her brother that someone wearing a ski mask was trying to break into her home. Seeing the apparent intruder with a "shiny object" in his hand, Giuliano fired a shot at him that proved fatal.

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@CloudGang @DonkeyHotay @tahosa65 @ianbrettcooper 

Americowards have cut and run from every war they've started and lost since Korea ...

... all of them against far smaller, weaker and poorer sovereign nations.



DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@CloudGang @tahosa65 @DonkeyHotay @ianbrettcooper 

HipTip: if you want "rights" and freedom, don't live in the country that has the MOST LAWS, STATUTES, CODES, RULES, RESTRICTIONS and Prohibitions on the books ... and correspondingly the MOST PEOPLE in PRISON in the world.

hth.

tahosa65
tahosa65

@DonkeyHotay @ianbrettcooper I'm an old guy and let me tell you a little secret about old guys. When we are too old to fight with you and you accost us, we will just kill you. Doubt if you call us any name after. 

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@CloudGang @DonkeyHotay @ianbrettcooper

Another one, filed under Cowards Shoot First !!

Retired Cop Fatally Shoots Own Son, After Mistaking Him For Burglar

CHICAGO — A retired Chicago police officer accidentally shot and killed his son early Tuesday, after mistaking him for a burglar, the officer’s family said.

Michael Griffin, 48, was killed at his father’s home in the 5300 block of North Delphia Avenue. His family said Griffin’s father, retired Chicago Police Detective James Griffin, mistook Michael for a burglar.

The Cook County Medical Examiner’s office said Michael Griffin died of a gunshot wound to the head.

Good Shot !!

DonkeyHotay
DonkeyHotay topcommenter

@CloudGang @DonkeyHotay @ianbrettcooper

Meanwhile a trigger-happy cowardly cop shoots first -- killing his own son!

OLD FORGE, NY –  State troopers say a police officer in New York shot and killed his son, mistaking him for an intruder.

Troopers say Parry Police Department Officer Michael Leach called 911 to report the shooting early Saturday.

He was staying at the Clark Beach Motel and shot someone he believed to be an intruder. But the man turned out to be his 37-year-old son, Matthew Leach, according to the Syracuse Post-Standard.

Troopers say Leach used his department-issued .45-caliber Glock handgun in the shooting.


CloudGang
CloudGang

@DonkeyHotay @ianbrettcooper ........meanwhile in Columbus," A Ohio woman used her handgun to stop a pair of armed and violent home invaders.

Police say that a pair of robbers went to the home of an acquaintance, where they held that man and his family at gunpoint while demanding money and prescription medication.  The mother of the homeowner, who was in a different room, reportedly realized what was happening and grabbed a handgun.  She then fired in self defense and defense of her family, striking one home invader and sending the other running, police say.  Two suspects, including one with a gunshot wound, were reportedly apprehended by police.  None of the victims were harmed, police say.

Yet again, we have another woman who was able to defend herself and her loved ones with a gun. Had this woman not been armed, she and her family could have been, victimized in their own home by a pair of dangerous attackers. Fortunately, this woman was armed for self defense, and as a result was able to save herself and the rest of her loved ones.  Once again, armed self defense works.

 
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