The Ludlow Massacre must not be forgotten

The Ludlow Massacre must not be forgotten
Patrick Faricy
This week, Westword looks back at one of the darkest episodes in Colorado history: the Ludlow Massacre, a shooting war between striking coal miners and state troops that had a profound impact on the state's politics and the American labor movement and still resonates a century later. Find our detailed coverage of the events leading up to the tragedy and its aftermath, including a video tour of the Ludlow Memorial, at westword.com.
 
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6 comments
mikenbfe
mikenbfe

sadly even as a 4th gen resident of this state i'd never heard of it, not once while in public school. ludlow was a tipping point in this nation's history which should be taught to all children in public schools across the country yet we don't even teach our own? you should NOT have to attend college, get a post grad degree so you can be cognisant of this state's most important historical events even if they are dark chapters we'd prefer to forget. most aren't aware too that even up until the late 60's it was common in ft collins and other front range communities to see signs in store front windows which read, "no dogs or mexicans allowed." be it ludlow, sand creek, racism and the kkk, even the illicit trade in alcohol during prohibition days so much that most children in this state will never know because our public schools have dropped the ball deliberately. 

so kudos to westword for doing what our schools have failed to do, educate and inform. those who fail to learn from past wrongs, mistakes are doomed to repeat them. let alone the fact that you need to know your history so you understand for example WHY we have such things as unions? a final note, not all forgotten history is bad. for example the first attempt to cross the divide by a circus via steam train did not turn out so well. they got caught in a surprise snow storm and were stuck in our high country. so everyone on the train helped remove as much snow as possible then they got the elephants out, tethered them to the front of the locomotive and they were able to pull the train out of the drift it had gotten stuck in. elephants saved the day! essentially you just don't know how much you don't know until you do. 

partial solution? if public schools aren't going to teach our history then make michner's "centennial" required reading as part of our public schools' curriculum.

dnvrgeoff
dnvrgeoff

Don't forget who owned Ludlow. And just so a few people know, many more than 20 people died in the massacre. I helped count the graves behind the adobes in the early 70's when I was a child. It is just sad that the owners of those mines have never had to face justice, they just build centers for them in New York City. 

DougHubka
DougHubka

Mine workers in those days were just one step above slavery. The 16 tons song is an accurate reflection of the living conditions for miners. Next tome you hear someone bitching about Labor Unions, Government heath and safety regulations  and workers demanding to be treated right, then have them read up on Ludlow. And Thank God and the Unions for you not having to work in these conditions.

muhutdafuga
muhutdafuga topcommenter

Just another example of American worker hating right wing extremists. 

tahosa65
tahosa65

People who think of the Pinkerton Detective Agency and Allen Pinkerton as hero's of the old West, need to know that they were little more than hired thugs usually working for the rich mine owners and railroad barons. They were mercenaries and murderers. That our State National Guard was included in this travesty speaks to the governmental malfeasance and corruption that continues to this day. If we remember Ludlow, that memory should include the concept that power corrupts.  

muhutdafuga
muhutdafuga topcommenter

@DougHubka I think your post is a fine one....the more one with any humanity at all understands history, the more they appreciate the unions.  You get a "like" from me.

 
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