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  • Article

    The Miracle Worker works, but it's nothing special

    William Gibson, who died recently at the age of 94, is best known for his play The Miracle Worker, and for making a star of the luminous Anne Bancroft, who played the lead on Broadway and later in the movie. The play tells the story of Annie Sulliva...

    on December 4, 2008
  • The Producers sticks a thumb in Hitler's eye

    Article

    The Producers sticks a thumb in Hitler's eye

    I saw the Broadway version of The Producers when the touring company came to Denver four years ago. It was one of those shows you knew you had to praise: The New York critics were so excited about it that dissenting would make you sound like a bad-t...

    by Juliet Wittman on December 4, 2008
  • Reimagining history at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center

    Article

    Reimagining history at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center

    Colorado -- and its prominent place in romantic notions about the Old West -- has achieved celebrity status. It's one of the reasons we're invaded year-round by armies of scenic paparazzi seeking to hunt down picturesque landscapes and take candid p...

    by Michael Paglia on November 27, 2008
  • Article

    Now Playing - Capsule reviews of current shows

    An O. Henry Christmas. Amid the cascade of Christmas Carol remounts, Hallmark Card family shows and limp holiday parodies, this musical arrangement of two O. Henry short stories -- "The Last Leaf" and "The Gift of the Magi," created by Peter Ekstrom...

    by Juliet Wittman on November 27, 2008
  • Germinal Stage makes an off-choice with The Show-Off

    Article

    Germinal Stage makes an off-choice with The Show-Off

    Sometimes I don't understand the decision-making at Germinal Stage Denver. I've had some of the most stimulating evenings of my life in this homey, cozy, unchanging little theater where -- as the website blurb assures us -- the actors are never more...

    by Juliet Wittman on November 27, 2008
  • Denver sees red with "National Velvet"

    Article

    Denver sees red with "National Velvet"

    Earlier this summer, a project that was dedicated as "finished" in 2006 was finally completed. It's the 16th Street Pedestrian Bridge, by Carter & Burgess, that crosses I-25 and connects the trendy Highland neighborhood to the ultra-trendy Platte Va...

    by Michael Paglia on November 27, 2008
  • Article

    Now Showing - Capsule reviews of current exhibits

    Adam Helms. This solo in the MCA's Paper Works Gallery is the New York artist's first museum show anywhere. In his works on paper and in a monumental sculpture that conjures up a shooting blind, Helms explores political themes, especially armed stru...

    by Michael Paglia on November 27, 2008
  • Ernest Blumenschein is on Taos time at the Denver Art Museum

    Article

    Ernest Blumenschein is on Taos time at the Denver Art Museum

    It sounds like a preposterous moment in a cheesy and sentimental Western: A couple of artists out of New York City head from Denver to Mexico by wagon, break down and start an art colony that goes on strong for the next sixty years. It really does s...

    by Michael Paglia on November 20, 2008
  • The Petrie Institute of Western American Art lands a new curator

    Article

    The Petrie Institute of Western American Art lands a new curator

    There have been some big changes recently at the Denver Art Museum's Petrie Institute of Western American Art. Last month, longtime associate curator Ann Daley stepped down after more than twenty years (Artbeat, October 9). And now, Petrie director ...

    by Michael Paglia on November 20, 2008
  • Article

    Now Playing - Capsule reviews of current shows

    Fat Pig. Neil LaBute's plays are nasty, but they usually contain subtext, irony and ambiguity. Fat Pig has none of these. It's flat and thin, a straightforward, almost schematic story with a quivering pink core. Tom, a shallow careerist male of the ...

    by Juliet Wittman on November 20, 2008
  • Article

    An O. Henry Christmas takes you on a sentimental journey

    Amid the cascade of Christmas Carol remounts, Hallmark family shows and limp holiday parodies, Peter Ekstrom's An O. Henry Christmas, now being staged by Miners Alley, is a refreshing seasonal choice. We all remember "The Gift of the Magi": A you...

    by Juliet Wittman on November 20, 2008
  • With Anywhere But Rome, Buntport is really going somewhere

    Article

    With Anywhere But Rome, Buntport is really going somewhere

    Ovid, otherwise known as Publius, has been banished from Rome and is traveling with Tiresias, standing at a crossroads, sticking out his thumb. Actually, he's packed Tiresias in his bag, which the blind seer fiercely resents. In a fit of fury, Ovid ...

    by Juliet Wittman on November 20, 2008
  • Andrew Kalmar and Ron Judish suit Denver to a T

    Article

    Andrew Kalmar and Ron Judish suit Denver to a T

    The art tidal wave that's hit Denver in the past few years hasn't just led to a museum-building boom. It has also led to an explosion of galleries. I haven't sat down to count all the commercial art venues in town, but I know it numbers more than a ...

    by Michael Paglia on November 13, 2008
  • Ann Hamilton: soundings at Robischon Gallery

    Article

    Ann Hamilton: soundings at Robischon Gallery

    Performance art, which has been around since the early twentieth century, is pointedly non-commercial because it's so ephemeral. It literally comes and goes with little remaining but memories -- and a few photos and props. It's the opposite of objec...

    by Michael Paglia on November 13, 2008
  • Article

    Art Caps - Capsule reviews of current exhibits

    Adam Helms. This solo in the MCA's Paper Works Gallery is the New York artist's first museum show anywhere. In his works on paper and in a monumental sculpture that conjures up a shooting blind, Helms explores political themes, especially armed stru...

    by Michael Paglia on November 13, 2008
  • Article

    Now Playing - Capsule reviews of current shows

    Fat Pig. Neil LaBute's plays are nasty, but they usually contain subtext, irony and ambiguity. Fat Pig has none of these. It's flat and thin, a straightforward, almost schematic story with a quivering pink core. Tom, a shallow careerist male of the ...

    on November 13, 2008
  • Stephen Karam speaks up for misfits in Curious Theatre's Speech & Debate

    Article

    Stephen Karam speaks up for misfits in Curious Theatre's Speech & Debate

    Three misfit high school students in Salem, Oregon, come together on the debate society. Solomon longs to be a professional reporter and wants to reveal the right-wing mayor's pederast activities in the school newspaper; Howie, a transfer student an...

    by Juliet Wittman on November 13, 2008
  • RedLine debuts with through a glass, darkly

    Article

    RedLine debuts with through a glass, darkly

    Laura Merage is an accomplished photo-based artist whose work I've reviewed a few times during the past decade. Her photos and photo-based pieces are supremely elegant and extremely sophisticated, as is she. More relevant to my story this week, howe...

    by Michael Paglia on November 6, 2008
  • Julia Fernandez-Pol at Carson van Straaten Gallery

    Article

    Julia Fernandez-Pol at Carson van Straaten Gallery

    When Sandy Carson, a fixture in Denver's contemporary art world, announced earlier this year that she had sold her namesake gallery, even insiders were shocked. Carson has been on the scene since the beginning of time, which in Denver means the 1970...

    by Michael Paglia on November 6, 2008
  • Article

    Now Showing - Capsule reviews of current exhibits

    Adam Helms. This solo in the MCA's Paper Works Gallery is the New York artist's first museum show anywhere. In his works on paper and in a monumental sculpture that conjures up a shooting blind, Helms explores political themes, especially armed stru...

    by Michael Paglia on November 6, 2008
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From the Print Edition

Conceptual art takes over Gildar Gallery

For his latest show, Takeover, Gildar Gallery owner Adam Gildar enlisted the help of Charlie James, a Los Angeles-based art dealer, who curated the show. The two have a similar… More >>

The Odd Couple is a good match for Miners Alley

There's not a lot of nourishment in Neil Simon's The Odd Couple, which premiered on Broadway in 1965, spawned a film and television show, and is now showing at Miners… More >>

Now Showing

Outside in 303.This summer feature at the Museo de las Amesricas is absolutely spectacular, with each of the included artists being given lots of space to stretch out. Conceived and… More >>

Now Playing

Henry IV, Part 1. King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily… More >>

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

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