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  • Article

    Cast Perfect - The Country Dinner Playhouse breathes life into Gypsy.

    The Country Dinner Playhouse confuses me. Just when I've got the place written off as old-fashioned and out of it, its operators come up with a really good show. Not just pretty good for dinner theater or "Well, at least the leads are talented, even ...

    by Juliet Wittman on December 23, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Always...Patsy Cline. Always ...Patsy Cline is a light, mildly entertaining evening. You get an efficiently evocative set that's divided into three parts: a down-home apartment; an old-fashioned country bar, complete with jukebox; and, in the center...

    on December 23, 2004
  • Article

    Rare Sightings - Jeff Starr and Margaret Neumann riff off their idiosyncrasies.

    Denver artist Jeff Starr became famous locally in the '80s, but in the late '90s, he took a powder and disappeared. Last year he made a big comeback when his work was selected for the 2003 biennial at Denver's Museum of Contemporary Art. Artists step...

    by Michael Paglia on December 16, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Earlier this fall, the Museum of Contemporary Art/Denver (1275 19th Street, 303-298-7554) launched a program called "NEW PIC" that highlights the work of worthwhile emerging artists in the area. Selected artists, who must live in Colorado and be unde...

    by Michael Paglia on December 16, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    ANGST. Though unified by the title ANGST, this duet put together by Lisbeth Neergaard Kohloff at the Colorado Photographic Arts Center is actually a pair of freestanding solos: IMAGING ACROPHOBIA and NIGHTWALK. IMAGING ACROPHOBIA is Colorado photog...

    on December 16, 2004
  • Article

    Present Joy - The Denver Center's annual Christmas Carol is sublime.

    The conversion of Scrooge at the end of Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol always delights, whether you're reading about it or seeing it on a stage. I remember Alistair Sim in the iconic 1951 movie, capering around the room in his nightgown, startli...

    by Juliet Wittman on December 16, 2004
  • Article

    For a Song - Patsy Cline is light entertainment.

    Always...Patsy Cline is a light, mildly entertaining evening. You get an efficiently evocative set that's divided into three parts: a down-home apartment; an old-fashioned country bar, complete with jukebox; and, in the center, the stage of the Grand...

    by Juliet Wittman on December 16, 2004
  • Article

    A Critic's View on LIDA - Another stage goes dark in Denver's theater community.

    At the end of last month, Brian Freeland, whose LIDA Project has been a vital presence on the Denver theater scene for the past ten years, sent out a press release announcing that the group is leaving town. They had intended, he said, "to reinvent th...

    by Juliet Wittman on December 16, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Boston Marriage. For the entire first act, Boston Marriage is pure enjoyment. It's light and fast, and the language is dizzyingly clever and cleverly self-punctuating. The plot concerns two nineteenth-century women who live together in an arrangemen...

    on December 16, 2004
  • Article

    View Masters - Karen Kitchel and David Sharpe record the Western landscape in solos at Robischon.

    Over the past few decades, the contemporary-art world has gotten so vast that no single approach can characterize our era in the way that abstract expressionism represents the '50s or pop art evokes the '60s. Now, just about anything goes, as long as...

    by Michael Paglia on December 9, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Though Spark Gallery (900 Santa Fe Drive, 720-889-2200) has been in its new digs since this past summer, the members have yet to figure out what to do with the new spot. I have an idea: Wheel some of those temporary walls into the generously sized st...

    by Michael Paglia on December 9, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Anxiety and Desire. Clare Cornell, assistant professor of digital imaging at the Metropolitan State College of Denver, put together Anxiety and Desire, an exhibit of photo-based pieces that address psychological concepts. He included work from an arr...

    on December 9, 2004
  • Article

    Voices That Carry - The 1940s Radio Hour bathes the stage in refreshing nostalgia.

    You're familiar, of course, with the old theatrical plot line in which the lead gets sick, the understudy is forced to go on in her place, and, after a hesitant start, the young woman wows the audience and becomes a star overnight. Something like tha...

    by Juliet Wittman on December 9, 2004
  • Article

    Simple Truths - Hearts to God struggles to convey the Shaker religion.

    The Shakers were a utopian, egalitarian religious group, originally an offshoot of the Quaker community in eighteenth-century England, whose adherents dedicated themselves to God by separating themselves from the world and giving up all worldly pleas...

    by Juliet Wittman on December 9, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Beirut. In Alan Browne's play, Beirut is the name given to New York's East Village, where, in a futuristic dystopia, HIV-positive people are quarantined (the play doesn't use the terms "AIDS" or "HIV," but the references are clear). Outside of this a...

    on December 9, 2004
  • Article

    Changing Views - Additions to downtown's built environment and possible subtractions in the hinterlands.

    Daniel Libeskind must be happy with Denver since, unlike in New York, the Polish-born American architect has been allowed to follow his vision to its logical conclusion. In New York, Libeskind's Freedom Tower, which will be erected on the site where ...

    by Michael Paglia on December 2, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Well-established Denver artist Michael Brohman takes an idiosyncratic route to contemporary sculpture in his solo, ME AND MY SHADOW, now at Pirate (3659 Navajo Street, 303-458-6058). Brohman has a preference for working in old-fashioned ways, using m...

    by Michael Paglia on December 2, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Anxiety and Desire. Clare Cornell, assistant professor of digital imaging at the Metropolitan State College of Denver, put together Anxiety and Desire, an exhibit of photo-based pieces that address psychological concepts. He included work from an a...

    on December 2, 2004
  • Article

    Im-purr-fect - Boulder Dinner Theatre's Cats can't overcome the show's built-in sentimentality.

    No one goes to see a play in a vacuum, so let me put the evening I attended Cats in context: It came at the end of a week spent alternately reading student papers (in my other life, I teach writing at CU) and conferencing with the authors of those pa...

    by Juliet Wittman on December 2, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Beirut. In Alan Browne's play, Beirut is the name given to New York's East Village, where, in a futuristic dystopia, HIV-positive people are quarantined (the play doesn't use the terms "AIDS" or "HIV," but the references are clear). Outside of this ...

    on December 2, 2004
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From the Print Edition

Conceptual art takes over Gildar Gallery

For his latest show, Takeover, Gildar Gallery owner Adam Gildar enlisted the help of Charlie James, a Los Angeles-based art dealer, who curated the show. The two have a similar… More >>

The Odd Couple is a good match for Miners Alley

There's not a lot of nourishment in Neil Simon's The Odd Couple, which premiered on Broadway in 1965, spawned a film and television show, and is now showing at Miners… More >>

Now Showing

Outside in 303.This summer feature at the Museo de las Amesricas is absolutely spectacular, with each of the included artists being given lots of space to stretch out. Conceived and… More >>

Now Playing

Henry IV, Part 1. King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily… More >>

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

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