<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  161  |  ...  |  322  |  ...  |  483  |  ...  |  551  |  552  |  553  |  ...  |  644  |  Next Page >> 11021 - 11040 of 12877

  • Article

    Encore

    Cabaret. Cabaret is grim and distressing, and there's not a hint of redemption anywhere in it. Quite the contrary. But this is a bloody good production, the kind of production that could attract all kinds of people who might never think of setting f...

    on September 23, 2004
  • Article

    Rotogravure - The Wohlauer memorial at CPAC provides a prelude to Denver's Month of Photography.

    Ronald W. Wohlauer, whom everyone called Ron, was one of those artists who always seemed to be at the top of the visual-art pyramid around here -- until, that is, his untimely death earlier this year. During his long career, which began more than thi...

    by Michael Paglia on September 16, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    It's surely surprising -- if not shocking -- to find one of the best ceramics shows of the year being presented at the modest and remote Lakewood Cultural Center (470 South Allison Parkway, 303-987-7876). But that's exactly what's going on now with P...

    by Michael Paglia on September 16, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    digital.movement.04. Tracy Weil, owner of the weilworks gallery, has a passion for computer-aided art. That's why he organized digital.movement.04: Installations in video, sound & digital animation, the first in a planned series of annuals featuring...

    on September 16, 2004
  • Article

    A Saturation Farce - The Wall of Water rushes through the whirling lives of four women.

    The more I think about The Wall of Water, currently being produced by the Hunger Artists Theatre, the more I like it. Playwright Sherry Kramer is obviously a comic talent to watch. The script is farcical, swift and funny, but it touches on all kinds ...

    by Juliet Wittman on September 16, 2004
  • Article

    Word Perfect - 84, Charing Cross Road celebrates the life of language.

    When I was a child growing up in London, someone gave me a large red book called Sunday, published in the 1880s. On the flyleaf was written "To little Nellie, from Papa." The book had been created for Victorian children trapped in their dark, stiflin...

    by Juliet Wittman on September 16, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Cabaret. Cabaret is grim and distressing, and there's not a hint of redemption anywhere in it. Quite the contrary. But this is a bloody good production, the kind of production that could -- and should -- attract all kinds of people who might never t...

    on September 16, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Stoppage, now in the main space at Pirate: a contemporary art oasis (3659 Navajo Street, 303-458-6058) is the latest in a long-running series of installation exhibits by Pirate member Richard Colvin and his partner, Katherine Temple. The piece is...

    by Michael Paglia on September 9, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    digital.movement.04. Tracy Weil, owner of the weilworks gallery has a passion for computer-aided art. That's why he organized digital.movement.04: Installations in video, sound & digital animation, the first in a planned series of annuals that will ...

    on September 9, 2004
  • Article

    Black and White Divide - Well-meaning Three Ways Home falls short as a drama.

    At the beginning of Three Ways Home, currently being produced by the Shadow Theatre Company, Sharon, a white career woman, has volunteered at a social-services agency. She's assigned to visit Dawn, an African-American welfare recipient suspected of a...

    by Juliet Wittman on September 9, 2004
  • Article

    Making a List - Trumbo: Red, White & Blacklisted offers a timely, if timid, lesson.

    Dalton Trumbo was a member of the Hollywood Ten, a group of writers whose careers were ruined during the McCarthy era because they stood up to the House Un-American Activities Committee. After his bluntly hilarious non-cooperative session with the co...

    by Juliet Wittman on September 9, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Cabaret. Cabaret is grim and distressing, and there's not a hint of redemption anywhere in it. Quite the contrary. But this is a bloody good production, the kind of production that could attract all kinds of people who might never think of setting f...

    on September 9, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    The adage about too many artists spoiling the installation is exemplified by a collaborative piece -- done by several of the co-op's members and by faculty from Metro -- on view in the front space at Edge Gallery (3658 Navajo Street, 303-477-7173). T...

    by Michael Paglia on September 2, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Dots, Blobs and Angels. Denver's Museum of Contemporary Art is presenting an enormous solo that is dedicated to the late David Rigsby, an artist who played a big part in the local art scene in the '70s and '80s. The exhibit was organized by director...

    on September 2, 2004
  • Article

    Audience Pleasers - Miners Alley acts up with its One-Act Festival.

    For its 2nd Annual Summer One-Act Festival, Miners Alley has put together two one-acts about the dramatic process itself. They're witty, playful and fun to watch, and they work well with each other. The first, Hidden in This Picture, is by Aaron ...

    by Juliet Wittman on September 2, 2004
  • Article

    Almost There - Musty The Play's the Thing lacks zing.

    OpenStage Theatre & Company in Fort Collins always walks a thin line between professional and community theater, and this production of The Play's the Thing falls definitively on the community side. The script is by Ferenc Molnar, a Hungarian aut...

    by Juliet Wittman on September 2, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Cabaret. Cabaret is grim and distressing, and there's not a hint of redemption anywhere in it. Quite the contrary. But this is a bloody good production, the kind of production that could -- and should -- attract all kinds of people who might never t...

    on September 2, 2004
  • Article

    Reality Shows - Contemporary representational art is on tap at both Robischon and Havu.

    It's amazing how vast the contemporary art world is, including as it does a full array of expressions -- from the most edgy forms, such as video, to the most conservative, such as landscapes, still-life scenes and portraits. Within the realm of repre...

    by Michael Paglia on August 26, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    There's a show at Andenken Gallery (2110 Market Street, 303-332-5582) with the cutesy title of Peachy Keen. Though the phrase has a retro '50s feel, the show itself has more of a '60s thing going on. You can't really blame this confusion on Morgan Ba...

    by Michael Paglia on August 26, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Common Ground. The Sandra Phillips Gallery specializes in abstraction, as is shown off in the current show, Common Ground, which combines neo-abstract-expressionist paintings by Jennifer Scott McLaughlin with neo-constructivist sculptures by William...

    on August 26, 2004
<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  161  |  ...  |  322  |  ...  |  483  |  ...  |  551  |  552  |  553  |  ...  |  644  |  Next Page >> 11021 - 11040 of 12877
Denver Concert Tickets

Find an Arts Event

From the Print Edition

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

Representational imagery shines at Havu

Rather than throw together a group show featuring work by artists whose work is unconnected, for its current exhibit, Articulated Perspectives, the William Havu Gallery focused on four artists who… More >>

Rajiv Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries is a cut above

Jamie Wollrab works in Los Angeles as a director, actor and acting coach, but he grew up in Boulder and loves Colorado. "My family lives here," he says, "and they… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Chris Richter. Back in March, gallery director Bobbi Walker realized that her planned June slot had come apart and that she needed to come up with somebody fast. At the… More >>

Loading...