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  • Article

    Fab Film - Forty years ago, Al Maysles met the Beatles.

    Albert Maysles, with brother David, made two different films about two different rock-and-roll bands five years apart, but to this day he can't think of one without immediately thinking of the other. The first he was shooting 40 years ago this very...

    by Robert Wilonsky on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Political Cartoons - African-American art is up at DU, while Mizel surveys the Jewish roots of the comics.

    Using politics to create art requires a skill for balancing aesthetics with philosophy, since political artwork must be visually successful while also conveying a message. The problem is that most artists can't pull it off -- something that's very ap...

    by Michael Paglia on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Balance. On the West Ninth Avenue side of Fresh Art, the Mayor's Office of Economic Development has paid for a tiny sculpture garden as part of the long, ongoing Santa Fe Drive beautification project. The garden, composed of a group of rectangular f...

    on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    It's no secret that the alternative scene in Denver has been pretty flat for the past couple of years. But it looks as though Edge Gallery (3658 Navajo Street, 303-477-7173), an artists' cooperative, is forging a path out of these woods. Since the be...

    by Michael Paglia on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Catfight Night - Arvada's revival of The Women isn't worth the fuss.

    Claire Boothe Luce's The Women was recently revived at the Roundabout Theatre in New York, a production I happened to catch one evening on television. It featured Cynthia Nixon, best known as Miranda in Sex and the City, as the wronged wife Mary Hain...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Blast From the Past - DCTC's adaptation of John Brown's Body stands tall.

    John Brown's Body isn't exactly a play; it doesn't have one absorbing plot line. Instead, it's an adaptation of Stephen Vincent Bent's famous 1928 epic poem about the Civil War, and, like all epics, it's a kind of episodic tapestry. There's chanting...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Beast on the Moon. The year is 1921. Aram Tomasian, a survivor of the 1915 massacre of Armenians by the Turks, is trying to make a life for himself in Milwaukee. He has bought himself a picture bride, a fifteen-year-old orphan called Seta. Aram is y...

    on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    The Hard Sell - Local filmmaker Shane Carruth won Sundance's top honor. So...now what?

    It was only a few days ago that Shane Carruth, software engineer-turned-filmmaker, was ready to walk away from the money on the table and keep his movie--78 minutes' worth of cheapo celluloid that had, in a Utah instant, become as valuable as strands...

    by Robert Wilonsky on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    The Clays of Our Lives - It's pottery by Picasso at the CVA, plus ceramics and more at Havu.

    Pablo Picasso had a long life -- he died in 1973 at age 92 -- and during his epic career, he made a number of key stylistic breakthroughs essential to the development of modern art. He was on the ground floor of cubism and surrealism and, come to thi...

    by Michael Paglia on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Ivar Zeile, previously with the Cordell Taylor Gallery, which has closed, and Ron Judish, the director of the gone-but-not-forgotten Judish Fine Arts, have together launched the city's newest art hot spot, (+) Zeile/Judish Gallery (2350 Lawrence Stre...

    by Michael Paglia on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Balance. On the West 11th Avenue side of Fresh Art, the Mayor's Office of Economic Development has paid for a tiny sculpture garden as part of the long, ongoing Santa Fe Drive beautification project. The garden, composed of a group of rectangular fo...

    on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    Silence Isn't Golden - Bas Bleu's Beast on the Moon exposes the torment of an almost-forgotten tragedy.

    The year is 1921. Aram Tomasian, a survivor of the 1915 massacre of Armenians by the Turks, is trying to make a life for himself in Milwaukee. He has bought himself a picture bride, a fifteen-year-old orphan called Seta. Aram is young, but he's rigid...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    God's in the Details - Visiting Mr. Green soars on subtle, super acting.

    I enjoyed almost every moment of Visiting Mr. Green, but the title character's Russian-style glass teacups disarmed me completely. During my teens, my Hungarian stepfather used to bring me tea with whiskey, lemon and honey in just such a cup whenever...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Bright Ideas. Bright Ideas is about a couple who will do anything to get their toddler into the best kindergarten in town. This could be a vacuous sitcom premise, but for the most part it's attacked with savage humor, leavened by moments of dazed em...

    on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    Hot and Cool - Abstract sculptures and paintings look good at Walker and Fresh Art.

    It's surprising, yet it's all but official: Walker Fine Art has established a place for itself at the main table of contemporary art in Denver. True, it hasn't quite reached the top tier of local venues, but it's only one level down from it -- pretty...

    by Michael Paglia on January 29, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Mark Sink, who runs Gallery Sink (2301 West 30th Avenue, 303-455-0185), has organized Staged Fantasy, an exhibit of posed photos by an assortment of contemporary photographers. A lot of the work relates to Sink's own efforts, which, though not includ...

    by Michael Paglia on January 29, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Full Frontal: Contemporary Asian Art from the Logan Collection. The normal stock in trade for the Denver Art Museum's Asian-art curator, Ron Otsuka, is traditional styles, but he's been drafted into doing contemporary duty by a gift that includes mor...

    on January 29, 2004
  • Article

    A Cursed Life - Existence is a struggle in Fucking A.

    What keeps a man alive? He lives on others. He likes to taste them first, then eat them whole if he can Forgets that they're supposed to be his brothers That he himself was ever called a man. -- Bertolt Brecht, The Threepenny Opera Suz...

    by Juliet Wittman on January 29, 2004
  • Article

    No Divine Comedy - Meshuggah Nuns requires too big a leap of faith.

    Meshuggah Nuns is the kind of show that seems to have no real reason for being. It's inoffensive and even amusing in spots, but it also feels like something created for the sole purpose of filling up time on stage. And in a world full of musicals wit...

    by Juliet Wittman on January 29, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Almost Heaven. Director Randal Myler has assembled a group of terrific musicians and a winning, uniformly strong cast. Each member brings a distinct and interesting sensibility to the music. The show is intelligently written and directed, and the pr...

    on January 29, 2004
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From the Print Edition

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

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I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

Representational imagery shines at Havu

Rather than throw together a group show featuring work by artists whose work is unconnected, for its current exhibit, Articulated Perspectives, the William Havu Gallery focused on four artists who… More >>

Rajiv Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries is a cut above

Jamie Wollrab works in Los Angeles as a director, actor and acting coach, but he grew up in Boulder and loves Colorado. "My family lives here," he says, "and they… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Chris Richter. Back in March, gallery director Bobbi Walker realized that her planned June slot had come apart and that she needed to come up with somebody fast. At the… More >>

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