<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  161  |  ...  |  322  |  ...  |  483  |  ...  |  559  |  560  |  561  |  ...  |  644  |  645  |  Next Page >> 11181 - 11200 of 12900

  • Article

    Now Showing

    Don Stinson, Chuck Forsman and Eric Paddock/Jim Colbert. The Western landscape's natural beauty has taken hold of the imagination of generations of artists, but during the last twenty years, some have chosen to examine the stickier topic of civilizat...

    on April 8, 2004
  • Article

    Enchanted Evening - Denver Center gives Blithe Spirit an airy outing.

    In many ways Noel Coward's life's work was being a blithe spirit -- and an intensely elegant one at that. An actor, writer and composer of songs, he was as much known for his suave persona as for his hilarious plays. He wrote Blithe Spirit in 1941, w...

    by Juliet Wittman on April 8, 2004
  • Article

    Tragic Comedy - Uneven direction adds flaws to risky Merchant of Venice.

    Although it's a comedy, The Merchant of Venice is far darker than such sunny Shakespearean offerings as Much Ado About Nothing and A Midsummer Night's Dream. It's also a difficult piece for modern audiences because of the central figure of Shylock. S...

    by Juliet Wittman on April 8, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Bat Boy: The Musical. The character of Bat Boy is based on a recurring character in the Weekly World News -- a two-foot-high boy, found in a cave in West Virginia, who endorsed Al Gore for president and later almost died after being sprayed by a pest...

    on April 8, 2004
  • Article

    Land Minds - The environment has inspired some of the state's best artists.

    Putting together a coherent art show is difficult, and so many of the shows I see -- even some of the good ones -- don't exactly make sense. Imagine, then, how rare it is to find not one, but three shows that all make sense. And not only that, but th...

    by Michael Paglia on April 1, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    The Sandy Carson Gallery (760 Santa Fe Drive, 303-573-8585) is the flagship art venue of the Santa Fe arts district, which makes it one of the top spots in town. High-quality exhibitions are the reason why -- and the current offering, 3 Search and Co...

    by Michael Paglia on April 1, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Full Frontal: Contemporary Asian Art From the Logan Collection. The normal stock in trade for the Denver Art Museum's Asian-art curator, Ron Otsuka, is traditional styles, but he's been drafted into doing contemporary duty by a gift that includes mo...

    on April 1, 2004
  • Article

    Shooting Blanks - Columbine-based Bingo Boyz targets the obvious.

    The massacre at Columbine High School has been so intensively covered in the media -- minutely dissected when it first occurred, rehashed with every newly uncovered fragment of information and on every yearly anniversary -- that it's hard to figure o...

    by Juliet Wittman on April 1, 2004
  • Article

    Deaf Jam - Wiggy Hairspray is pleasing to the eye, but hard on the ear.

    It was too loud. That was, I'm afraid, my prevailing impression of Hairspray. It was so loud that periodically I stuck my fingers in my ears. So loud that when a performer began one of those songs that starts low and intense, I found myself coweri...

    by Juliet Wittman on April 1, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Bat Boy: The Musical. The character of Bat Boy is based on a recurring character in the Weekly World News -- a two-foot-high boy, found in a cave in West Virginia, who endorsed Al Gore for president and later almost died after being sprayed by a pest...

    on April 1, 2004
  • Article

    Jersey Gurgle - Kevin Smith is Silent Bob? Dude, my butt he is.

    Full disclosure: I like precisely one and a half Kevin Smith movies. There's the one everyone else hates, the John Hughes homage Mallrats, and the first hour of the one everyone else loves, Chasing Amy, which dries up around the time Ben Affleck dump...

    on April 1, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Don Stinson, Chuck Forsman and Eric Paddock/Jim Colbert. The Western landscape's natural beauty has taken hold of the imagination of generations of artists, but during the last twenty years, some have chosen to examine the stickier topic of civiliza...

    on March 25, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Art. Art begins and ends with an all-white painting -- or an empty canvas, depending on how you look at it. Serge, a wealthy dermatologist, has just invested 200,000 francs (about $40,000) in this painting, which features diagonal white lines on a w...

    on March 25, 2004
  • Article

    No More Wussies - Or, why Tom Hanks isn't Steve Guttenberg

    Tom Hanks is who Tom Hanks is today because of something he did about 14 years ago. One afternoon, Hanks walked into his agent's office and told the man who takes 10 percent, "I don't want to play pussies anymore." He had spent the better part of the...

    by Robert Wilonsky on March 25, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    BECAUSE THE EARTH IS 1/3 DIRT. The CU Art Museum on the University of Colorado's Boulder campus is an unlikely setting for a blockbuster contemporary ceramics exhibit -- but here it is, anyway. The show was curated by a committee that included museum...

    on March 18, 2004
  • Article

    Beauty, Strength and Weirdness - Lyrical paintings, bold sculptures and bad behavior are all on display.

    Bill Havu, director of his namesake William Havu Gallery, has taken an interesting observation and turned it into an excellent show. After noticing that many mid-career artists across the country were creating paintings inspired by abstract expressio...

    by Michael Paglia on March 18, 2004
  • Article

    Light but Right - Boulder's Dinner Theatre puts on a vibrant Dreamcoat.

    Boulder's Dinner Theatre changed hands last fall. It was sold by founder-director Ross Haley to local neurosurgeon Dr. Gene Bolles and his wife, Judy; they hired a new artistic director, Michael J. Duran -- who, just coincidentally, starred in the BD...

    by Juliet Wittman on March 18, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Dorothea Dunlop was a notable Denver-born sculptor whose long career spanned the past forty years. She died on February 19 at age ninety, of complications from a stroke. Reflecting the mores of the era in which she lived, Dunlop had been a full-time ...

    by Michael Paglia on March 18, 2004
  • Article

    Winged Victory - Bat Boy: The Musical is ready for takeoff.

    Bat Boy: The Musical ends like a Shakespearean tragedy, with bodies dropping all over the stage, while horrified onlookers shudder and weep. It's just that in Shakespeare, the bodies don't rise up again to sing the finale. The character of Bat Boy...

    by Juliet Wittman on March 18, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Art. Art begins and ends with an all-white painting -- or an empty canvas, depending on how you look at it. Serge, a wealthy dermatologist, has just invested 200,000 francs (about $40,000) in this painting, which features diagonal white lines on a w...

    on March 18, 2004
<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  161  |  ...  |  322  |  ...  |  483  |  ...  |  559  |  560  |  561  |  ...  |  644  |  645  |  Next Page >> 11181 - 11200 of 12900
Denver Concert Tickets

Find an Arts Event

From the Print Edition

Conceptual art takes over Gildar Gallery

For his latest show, Takeover, Gildar Gallery owner Adam Gildar enlisted the help of Charlie James, a Los Angeles-based art dealer, who curated the show. The two have a similar… More >>

The Odd Couple is a good match for Miners Alley

There's not a lot of nourishment in Neil Simon's The Odd Couple, which premiered on Broadway in 1965, spawned a film and television show, and is now showing at Miners… More >>

Now Showing

Outside in 303.This summer feature at the Museo de las Amesricas is absolutely spectacular, with each of the included artists being given lots of space to stretch out. Conceived and… More >>

Now Playing

Henry IV, Part 1. King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily… More >>

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

Loading...