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  • Article

    Unhappy History - A look back at the tawdry minstrel-show era.

    With Carlyle Brown's The Little Tommy Parker Celebrated Colored Minstrel Show, Jeffrey Nickelson's Shadow Theatre Company continues its mission of education and enlightenment. The play deals with a musical form that many of us would rather forget. Ac...

    by Juliet Wittman on March 4, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Cookin' at the Cookery. Singer Alberta Hunter had an extraordinary life. She left her Memphis home at the age of twelve for Chicago, where she got her start at a rough club called Dago Frank's. Eventually, she moved to New York City, becoming part o...

    on March 4, 2004
  • Article

    Clay Pride - The state of the art in contemporary ceramics is on display at the CU Art Museum.

    These days, it's hard to mention the University of Colorado at Boulder and keep a straight face. I'm referring, of course, to the involuntary smirks, cringes and eye-rolling that are among the most common responses to hearing all the juicy dirt about...

    by Michael Paglia on February 26, 2004
  • Article

    Artyard - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    The current show at Denver's modest but highly regarded Artyard Sculpture Gallery (1251 South Pearl Street, 303-777-3219) features the latest body of work by Carley Warren, a famous name in local sculpture circles. The exhibit, Burdens, highlights th...

    by Michael Paglia on February 26, 2004
  • Article

    Art Attack

    Full Frontal: Contemporary Asian Art from the Logan Collection. The normal stock in trade for the Denver Art Museum's Asian-art curator, Ron Otsuka, is traditional styles, but he's been drafted into doing contemporary duty by a gift that includes mo...

    on February 26, 2004
  • Article

    Brotherly Hate - Denver Repertory's True West succeeds with actors' intensity.

    The Denver Repertory Theatre is a new company inhabiting an old railroad station hard by Denver's light rail. It's a terrific building that houses a collection of artists' studios and boasts shining wood, interesting rooms and crannies, bits of antiq...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 26, 2004
  • Article

    On Stage

    Cookin' at the Cookery. Singer Alberta Hunter had an extraordinary life. She left her Memphis home at the age of twelve for Chicago, where she got her start at a rough club called Dago Frank's. Eventually, she moved to New York City, becoming part o...

    on February 26, 2004
  • Article

    The Wild West - Flaming Guns colors the stage a raucous red.

    Flaming Guns of the Purple Sage is a manic, farcical take on the myth of the West, mixed with a large dollop of gothic horror. Best of all, it's a genuinely clever, funny and outrageous script. Bits and pieces of things you've seen before float to th...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 26, 2004
  • Article

    Great Walls - Expectations are high for the MCA's new digs, and its Chinese photo show is terrific.

    It would be an understatement to say that there's a lot of excitement surrounding the marvelous idea of constructing a new building to house Denver's Museum of Contemporary Art. And even if the MCA hasn't yet mounted a campaign to raise the $3 millio...

    by Michael Paglia on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Shots of mountains, cowboys and horses, and other subjects evocative of the American West make up most of Photographs by Barbara Van Cleve, the solo at the Camera Obscura Gallery (1309 Bannock Street, 303-623-4059). Born in Montana and living today i...

    by Michael Paglia on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Balance. On the West Ninth Avenue side of Fresh Art, the Mayor's Office of Economic Development has paid for a tiny sculpture garden as part of the long, ongoing Santa Fe Drive beautification project. The garden, composed of a group of rectangular f...

    on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Musical Mimicry - Cookin' at the Cookery offers a bland take on a salty singer.

    Singer Alberta Hunter had an extraordinary life. At age twelve, she left her Memphis home for Chicago, where she got her start at a rough club called Dago Frank's. She moved to New York City in the 1920s and became part of the Harlem Renaissance alon...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Power Pinter - Puzzling No Man's Land remains emotionally grounded.

    We go to a play by Harold Pinter with certain expectations. We expect ambiguity, eloquent silences, language used like a scalpel or to parody literary convention and ordinary use. There won't be a plot, and the action will be puzzling, but it will in...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Beast on the Moon. The year is 1921. Aram Tomasian, a survivor of the 1915 massacre of Armenians by the Turks, is trying to make a life for himself in Milwaukee. He has bought himself a picture bride, a fifteen-year-old orphan called Seta. Aram is y...

    on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Fab Film - Forty years ago, Al Maysles met the Beatles.

    Albert Maysles, with brother David, made two different films about two different rock-and-roll bands five years apart, but to this day he can't think of one without immediately thinking of the other. The first he was shooting 40 years ago this very...

    by Robert Wilonsky on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Political Cartoons - African-American art is up at DU, while Mizel surveys the Jewish roots of the comics.

    Using politics to create art requires a skill for balancing aesthetics with philosophy, since political artwork must be visually successful while also conveying a message. The problem is that most artists can't pull it off -- something that's very ap...

    by Michael Paglia on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Balance. On the West Ninth Avenue side of Fresh Art, the Mayor's Office of Economic Development has paid for a tiny sculpture garden as part of the long, ongoing Santa Fe Drive beautification project. The garden, composed of a group of rectangular f...

    on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    It's no secret that the alternative scene in Denver has been pretty flat for the past couple of years. But it looks as though Edge Gallery (3658 Navajo Street, 303-477-7173), an artists' cooperative, is forging a path out of these woods. Since the be...

    by Michael Paglia on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Catfight Night - Arvada's revival of The Women isn't worth the fuss.

    Claire Boothe Luce's The Women was recently revived at the Roundabout Theatre in New York, a production I happened to catch one evening on television. It featured Cynthia Nixon, best known as Miranda in Sex and the City, as the wronged wife Mary Hain...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Blast From the Past - DCTC's adaptation of John Brown's Body stands tall.

    John Brown's Body isn't exactly a play; it doesn't have one absorbing plot line. Instead, it's an adaptation of Stephen Vincent Bent's famous 1928 epic poem about the Civil War, and, like all epics, it's a kind of episodic tapestry. There's chanting...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 12, 2004
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From the Print Edition

Five Reasons Why It Would Be Stupid to Demolish Boettcher Concert Hall

Michael Paglia isn't a big fan of the City & County of Denver when it comes to architectural and artistic decisions. After all, he writes, officials there have fumbled everything… More >>

Jamie Ann Romero Exits Denver for the Bright Lights of New York City

Every now and then, you realize you're watching a genuine star. Not just a very good, emotionally generous actor who makes intellectually interesting choices, but someone possessed of a quality… More >>

Now Showing

Angela Beloian and Roger Hubbard. For In Technicolor, her new exhibit at Walker Fine Art, Boulder artist Angela Beloian created a body of retro '60s and '70s paintings and screen… More >>

Now Playing

On Golden Pond. As this play opens, Norman and Ethel Thayer are moving back into their summer house in Maine. Every summer for 48 years, he's come here to fish… More >>

Mack & Mabel: The Script Bores, but the Music Soars

Mack & Mabel purports to tell the story of the confused and conflicted love between Mack Sennett, impresario of the early comic silent movies, and Mabel Normand, the young woman… More >>

The DAM's Tom Wesselmann Show Is a Lesson in Art History

Michael Paglia has been writing about the art scene in Denver and Front Range for twenty years, following the latest shows, trends and news at museums and galleries. Read his… More >>

Now Showing

Angela Beloian and Roger Hubbard. For In Technicolor, her new exhibit at Walker Fine Art, Boulder artist Angela Beloian created a body of retro '60s and '70s paintings and screen… More >>

Now Playing

On Golden Pond. As this play opens, Norman and Ethel Thayer are moving back into their summer house in Maine. Every summer for 48 years, he's come here to fish… More >>

Ignite Theatre's Rent Has Room to Grow

The audience for Ignite Theatre's Rent is large, boisterous, young, and deeply involved with the action. Throughout the evening, you hear hoots of appreciative laughter, empathetic breath intakes and murmurs,… More >>

Four Artists Explore the World of Codes at Sandra Phillips

Michael Paglia has been writing about the art scene in Denver and Front Range for twenty years, following the latest shows, trends and news at museums and galleries. See his… More >>

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