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  • Article

    Rooms of Doom - The challenging House of Bernarda Alba lacks heat.

    Federico Garca Lorca's The House of Bernarda Alba is a difficult play to carry off. The plot concerns a group of five daughters confined within the walls of their house for an eight-year mourning period by the iron will of their bitter, violent, wid...

    by Juliet Wittman on May 20, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Alarms & Excursions. Alarms & Excursions is minor Michael Frayn, a series of comic finger pieces, but it can't help bearing the master's stamp. A group of eight playlets examines the role of technology in our lives and its impact on human communicat...

    on May 20, 2004
  • Article

    Jewish Identity - Rose finds a fresh approach to confronting Holocaust horrors.

    As Rose opens, an ailing woman in her eighties sits shiva on a public bench. We don't know whose death she is mourning, though she tells us early on that her own daughter was killed by the Nazis at age nine. The character, Rose, then takes us on a to...

    by Juliet Wittman on May 13, 2004
  • Article

    Hard to Swallow - Triple Espresso has all the novelty of a Starbucks.

    Triple Espresso is like the first few minutes of a dinner-theater production. You know, the part where the emcee comes out and congratulates the people in the audience who are celebrating birthdays or anniversaries, jokes with a pretty girl, gets imp...

    by Juliet Wittman on May 13, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Alarms & Excursions. Alarms & Excursions is minor Michael Frayn, a series of comic finger pieces, but it can't help bearing the master's stamp. A group of eight playlets examines the role of technology in our lives and its impact on human communicat...

    on May 13, 2004
  • Article

    Fragile Legacies - The fate of classic modern architecture in the suburbs is now at a crossroads.

    American art in the post-World War II period is generally considered by scholars to represent a high point in recorded history. In the '50s, '60s and '70s, American modernism dominated the world, and the greatest painters, sculptors, designers and ar...

    by Michael Paglia on May 13, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Though the ordinary fare at Gallery Sink (2301 West 30th Street, 303-455-0185) is photography, work in other media is featured from time to time. Painting is the mode showcased in Jeremiah Coleman Teutsch: Six Married Couples and One Lonely Mountain ...

    by Michael Paglia on May 13, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Abstractions on Paper. The current show at the city's coziest little art shop, the Emil Nelson Gallery, is a fascinating group endeavor put together by director Hugo Anderson. The exhibit combines historic and contemporary works in the form of water...

    on May 13, 2004
  • Article

    Modern Classics - With Olitski and Rauschenberg, Denver gets a double dose of the big time.

    It's safe to say that no matter when you go to the Singer Gallery at the Mizel Center for Arts and Culture, there's always something worth seeing. But to describe the current offering as being merely worthwhile would be a major understatement, becaus...

    by Michael Paglia on May 6, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Located across the street from the west side of the Denver Art Museum, next to the venerable Camera Obscura, is the city's coziest little art shop, the Emil Nelson Gallery (1307 Bannock Street, 303-534-0996). Into the warren of small rooms that once ...

    by Michael Paglia on May 6, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Full Frontal: Contemporary Asian Art From the Logan Collection. The normal stock in trade for the Denver Art Museum's Asian-art curator, Ron Otsuka, is traditional styles, but he's been drafted into doing contemporary duty by a gift that includes mor...

    on May 6, 2004
  • Article

    Plain Frayn - Alarms & Excursions serves up some sketchy comedy.

    Michael Frayn has to be one of the cleverest writers alive. He's responsible for the brain-teasing profundity of Copenhagen, a play that examines the race for the atom bomb during World War II in the context of a visit by Werner Heisenberg, then work...

    by Juliet Wittman on May 6, 2004
  • Article

    Cutting Edge - Buntport Theater has fun with one-acts and paper props.

    Now that Buntport Theater has come of age and is attracting reliably positive reviews and large, enthusiastic audiences, the six company members have revived one of their earlier works, an evening of one-acts titled 2 in 1. The first piece, "This is ...

    by Juliet Wittman on May 6, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Book of Days. Lanford Wilson's Book of Days is a bitter exegesis of life in small-town America; the cast serves as narrator and chorus. At its heart is a murder. The play tells us that life in this country has been corrupted on every level and in al...

    on May 6, 2004
  • Article

    Mexican Heritage - Paintings of colonial Mexico are showcased in the DAM's current blockbuster.

    There's an important exhibit at the Denver Art Museum that's being given the royal treatment, which makes sense, because it's filled with regal pieces. The blockbuster is Painting a New World: Mexican Art and Life, 1521-1821, a mammoth endeavor that ...

    by Michael Paglia on April 29, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Evan. For the first show at Capsule on Santa Fe, director Lauri Lynnxe Murphy chose to feature the work of her old friend and fellow ILK co-op founder, Evan Colbert. Not all of the pieces in the wonderful solo are new; a few were done years ago, whe...

    on April 29, 2004
  • Article

    Small Town Downer - Lanford Wilson's genius draws blanks in Book of Days.

    I've been a fan of Lanford Wilson's work ever since I saw one of his early one-acts at the legendary Caffe Cino in New York in the mid-1960s. It might have been This Is the Rill Speaking, and I think it played in tandem with Sam Shepard's Icarus's Mo...

    by Juliet Wittman on April 29, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    California-based photographer Rick Nahmias was researching famed TV journalist Edward R. Murrow when he came upon Harvest of Shame, Murrow's 1960s documentary about the dreadful living conditions of farm workers. The film inspired Nahmias to revisit ...

    by Michael Paglia on April 29, 2004
  • Article

    Badly Dated - Empty talk undercuts a serious subject in Boy Gets Girl.

    I'm absolutely mystified by the weakness of this script. Playwright Rebecca Gilman has won awards and been praised in all the right places. Although it had problems, I rather liked her Spinning Into Butter, which was produced at the Denver Center a c...

    by Juliet Wittman on April 29, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Bat Boy: The Musical. The character of Bat Boy is based on a recurring character in the Weekly World News -- a two-foot-high boy, found in a cave in West Virginia, who endorsed Al Gore for president and later almost died after being sprayed by a pes...

    on April 29, 2004
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