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  • Article

    Love Will Keep Them Together

    When Bernard Slade's Same Time, Next Year debuted on Broadway in 1975, the play about a man and a woman who rendezvous once a year at a California inn was praised for its "genuinely funny" look at how attitudes toward marriage had changed between the...

    by Jim Lillie on April 22, 1999
  • Article

    Long-Term Commitments

    Russell Beardsley emerged on the Denver art scene while still a student. The first shows of his conceptual metal sculptures were presented to both critical and popular acclaim in 1993, a year before he earned his BFA from the University of Colorado a...

    by Michael Paglia on April 15, 1999
  • Article

    Reckless Behavior

    Far from being just a dirty family secret, incest is the supreme betrayal of familial trust. The unspeakable offense--which often suffocates both victim and perpetrator in a cloak of silent shame and sworn secrecy--invariably rears its ugly head from...

    by Jim Lillie on April 15, 1999
  • Article

    Same Ol' Gal

    The problem with producing My Fair Lady is that (a) most audience members harbor fond memories of the 1964 film starring Rex Harrison and Audrey Hepburn; (b) most of those same theatergoers have already seen umpteen different stage versions that pale...

    by Jim Lillie on April 15, 1999
  • Article

    Weaving a Story

    The Colorado History Museum's major exhibition this season is Spirit of Spider Woman, an intelligent and elegantly presented examination of Navajo weaving that's been two years in the making. But don't expect the dry, straightforward approach that i...

    by Michael Paglia on April 8, 1999
  • Article

    Women's Wear

    Near the end of Josefina Lopez's Real Women Have Curves, an aspiring young writer tells us that as she grew up, she wanted to teach her Chicana elders how to live a better, more liberated life. "But in their own way," Anna says in retrospect of her m...

    by Jim Lillie on April 8, 1999
  • Article

    Chivalry's Nearly Killed

    To dismiss Cervantes's epic novel about the quintessential dreamer Don Quixote as an insubstantial story about chivalry is like saying that King Lear is just a grumpy old man's four-hour rant. Or that Chekhov's four comic masterpieces are simply bori...

    by Jim Lillie on April 8, 1999
  • Article

    The Wild, Wild West

    When John Hull moved to Denver last year to become the head of the art department at the University of Colorado's Denver campus, the city didn't gain just another academic. It also netted itself an important artist, as shown in John Hull Narrative Pa...

    by Michael Paglia on April 1, 1999
  • Article

    A Long Night Out

    Despite an encouraging beginning, several refreshing portrayals and a few side-splitting moments, the Mirror Image's evening of three one-act plays starts to run out of steam after the second offering. That's understandable, given that two and a half...

    by Jim Lillie on April 1, 1999
  • Article

    Voice Lessons

    Can a performing artist, whether it be legendary opera diva Maria Callas or veteran New York actress Gordana Rashovich, subjugate herself to a writer's intent while imbuing his work with her own unforgettable charisma? Is it possible to be at once tr...

    by Jim Lillie on April 1, 1999
  • Article

    Sticks and Stones

    The landscape has served as both artistic inspiration and subject matter for thousands of years, dating back to Neolithic cave painting. And today the landscape's allure is just as strong, even if the pieces it inspires are often far from traditional...

    by Michael Paglia on March 25, 1999
  • Article

    Squall Lines

    Infused with more theatricality--and more songs--than any other play in the Shakespearean canon, yet lacking a plot substantial enough to undergird the work's inlaid histrionics, The Tempest has for centuries fascinated, confounded and inspired direc...

    by Jim Lillie on March 25, 1999
  • Article

    The Sound and the Furry

    Somewhere in the mad rush to ensure that our children will know more than we did at their age--even if they don't yet have a clue what to do with all that knowledge--what often gets overlooked is an idea as old as humanity itself: The encouragement o...

    by Jim Lillie on March 25, 1999
  • Article

    Picture This

    The role of photography in contemporary art hasn't always been black and white. Although today photography is highly prized, as recently as thirty years ago, many in the art world--including the director of the Denver Art Museum--questioned whether i...

    by Michael Paglia on March 18, 1999
  • Article

    Primal Screams

    You'd think that plays about dysfunctional families and "personal identity issues" would have run their course by now. Well, think again, Oprah fans. Just when it seemed as if America's collective navel-picking and self-pity-partying were headed for ...

    by Jim Lillie on March 18, 1999
  • Article

    Place Settings

    When British artist Erica Daborn moved to Los Angeles in 1987, she came empty-handed. Leaving her work back in England, she arrived in the United States with little more than her art degrees from the Winchester School of Art and the Royal College of ...

    by Michael Paglia on March 11, 1999
  • Article

    That Sinking Feeling

    Like any good tragedy, the Broadway musical Titanic begins by introducing us to characters who yearn, Icarus-like, to "fabricate great works" that will confer a larger sense of meaning on their day-to-day lives. Citing such manmade marvels as the Par...

    by Jim Lillie on March 11, 1999
  • Article

    Home of the Depraved

    As the majestic strains of Aaron Copland's "Fanfare for the Common Man" play in the background prior to the start of The Complete History of America (Abridged), you can hear some devilish laughter as the audience anticipates a sharply satirical take ...

    by Jim Lillie on March 11, 1999
  • Article

    West by Southwest

    By the early twentieth century, artists from the East Coast, as well as emigres from Europe, were making their way to the handful of art colonies springing up out West. They came to places like Santa Fe, Sedona, even Colorado Springs, for a variety o...

    by Michael Paglia on March 4, 1999
  • Article

    House of Spirits

    If it's true that the supreme test of any classic play lies in its adaptability to a modern director's radical vision, then it's also true that the playwright's unique insight into the human condition is what made the play a classic in the first plac...

    by Jim Lillie on March 4, 1999
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From the Print Edition

Animal Crackers is a crack-up at the Denver Center

The musical Animal Crackers, starring the Marx Brothers, debuted on Broadway in 1928 and was filmed a couple of years later. It's a romp, a trifle — full of puns,… More >>

Lauri Lynnxe Murphy returns with Nest/Shed at Mai Wyn Fine Art

Lauri Lynnxe Murphy is well known here, having established her name as both an artist and an art advocate over the past two decades. But she fell off the radar… More >>

Now Showing

1959. Dean Sobel, director of the Clyfford Still Museum, is the host curator for Modern Masters at the Denver Art Museum, and he's done a companion exhibit at his own… More >>

Now Playing

And the Sun Stood Still. The shining strength of Dava Sobel's And the Sun Stood Still is that, at a time when the sciences have been so muddied by sloppy… More >>

Modern Masters at the DAM shines with star power

Denver Art Museum director Christoph Heinrich has a gift for understanding how to attract an audience. His secret is presenting exhibits that appeal not only to the art crowd, but… More >>

Judy Garland's singing is the pot of gold at The End of the Rainbow

I walked into the Arvada Center for the Judy Garland bio-play-musical End of the Rainbow thinking about the intense gay identification with such icons as Judy Garland, Edith Piaf and… More >>

Home is where the art is in The Road to Mecca

Athol Fugard's The Road to Mecca, currently playing at Miners Alley, explores huge and unanswerable questions: questions about age, death, love and trust, the meaning of home and the significance… More >>

Now Showing

Critical Focus: Ian Fisher. This show, located in the informal Whole Room at MCA Denver, is made up of a group of mostly monumental paintings of the sky. It's the… More >>

Dava Sobel's And the Sun Stood Still shines at BETC

The shining strength of Dava Sobel's And the Sun Stood Still — which is currently receiving its world premiere in Boulder — is that, at a time when the sciences… More >>

Print works take center stage at Goodwin Fine Art

Mo'Print, the Month of Printmaking, is winding down, and although the centerpiece is the Open Press show at the McNichols Building, there have been dozens of other events focused on… More >>

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