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  • Article

    Musical Cheers

    Think about it: Musicals are absurd. The minimal plots coast along on thin ice and then, suddenly, for no good reason, somebody erupts into song. The music is usually as thin as the plot line, and the characterizations are really about striking appro...

    on August 14, 1997
  • Article

    Gallery Talk

    When we tuned in last fall, there were two groups vying to open a new museum in Denver dedicated to contemporary art. One group included such well-known Denver artists as Dale Chisman, Mark Sink and Linde Schlumbohm. This group dubbed itself "CoMoCA,...

    by Michael Paglia on August 7, 1997
  • Article

    A Simple Pleasure

    Playwright Tom Donaghy's Minutes From the Blue Route offers a surprisingly tender, conciliatory look at a mildly dysfunctional family. And with its production of the piece, the Boulder Repertory Company has once again distinguished itself as a troupe...

    on August 7, 1997
  • Article

    Hollywood and Vain

    Playwright David Mamet's remarkable Speed-the-Plow is as true to the contemporary American cityscape as an Edward Hopper painting. Mamet's tough-mouthed dialogue--always a series of interruptions and eruptions--falls with an intoxicating rhythm on th...

    on August 7, 1997
  • Article

    Summer Vocations

    For many years, the exhibition calendar in the art world featured a preordained hierarchy of shows. In the fall, galleries, museums and other venues presented their most important events. Then, special exhibits launched the winter holiday season. The...

    by Michael Paglia on July 31, 1997
  • Article

    Ebony and Irony

    A new theater company has just arrived in Denver with a hot agenda and a cool style: Shadow Theatre Company is intent on bringing more plays by African-American playwrights to the boards. And if its first production, Innocent Thoughts, by William Dow...

    on July 31, 1997
  • Article

    Appalachian Zing

    When Carlisle Floyd wrote the exquisite opera Susannah in the mid-1950s, Senator Joseph McCarthy was out hunting up commies under every rock and movie studio. It was a bleak, hysterical period--but it was nothing new. Witch-hunts crop up over and ove...

    on July 31, 1997
  • Article

    Taken for Granite

    This has not been a great year for sculpture in Denver. First, the Solar Fountain by Larry Bell and Eric Orr that had graced the never-landscaped lawn of the Denver Performing Arts Complex was unceremoniously bulldozed off its foundation and tossed i...

    by Michael Paglia on July 24, 1997
  • Article

    Country Music

    Poor John Adams. Obnoxious and disliked, the lawyer from Massachusetts who prodded Thomas Jefferson to compose the Declaration of Independence just couldn't get along with the other founding fathers. But irritating as he may have been, he was an Amer...

    on July 17, 1997
  • Article

    Hit Parade

    For some reason, all of the important small public art venues in the metro area are located on the northwest side. In Boulder, there's the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, in Arvada the Arvada Center and in Golden the Foothills Art Center. Each of...

    by Michael Paglia on July 10, 1997
  • Article

    Oy Story

    Exuberant musicals are the Country Dinner Playhouse's stock-in-trade, though sometimes that exuberance can seem forced. The most recent show at the Playhouse, 42nd Street, was a terrific, bouncy re-creation of a 1930s extravaganza and the best thing ...

    on July 10, 1997
  • Article

    Holy Moly

    The frailties of human nature were meat and drink to Moliere. His comedies live on because they so cleverly skewered hypocrisy, pretentiousness and ego-driven stupidity, and his sense of the absurd is just as relevant now as it ever was. This year th...

    on July 10, 1997
  • Article

    Curtains

    Since last year, New York-based conceptual guru Christo and his sidekick Jeanne-Claude have virtually taken up residence on the Front Range. First there was that show of drawings and collages at One/West in Fort Collins in the summer of 1995. Then, i...

    by Michael Paglia on July 3, 1997
  • Article

    Dead on Arrival

    Capital punishment is on everybody's mind these days, what with Timothy McVeigh's conviction and JonBenet's murderer still on the loose. So the regional premiere of Colorado playwright David Hall's The Quality of Mercy is timely enough. And CityStage...

    on July 3, 1997
  • Article

    Wings and a Prayer

    Playwright Tony Kushner took on an astounding feat when he wrote Angels in America. The six-and-a-half-hour play consists of two parts--"The Millennium Approaches," in which everything begins to come undone, and "Perestroika," in which all of the pla...

    on July 3, 1997
  • Article

    Six for Eight

    This weekend Denver will be paralyzed by the Summit of the Eight, this year's version of the Group of Seven conferences that have been held for years. These meetings bring together the leaders of the richest countries on earth--the United States, Can...

    by Michael Paglia on June 19, 1997
  • Article

    Above the Fray

    The current revival of 1920s and '30s academic surrealism has grown into an international school of contemporary painting, and it has local legs that stretch back to the 1970s. Its adherents employ traditional painting genres such as landscapes, port...

    by Michael Paglia on June 12, 1997
  • Article

    On the Rise

    Chip Walton is one of the brightest young talents to crash the Denver theater scene in years. He's an accomplished actor who made an elegant, riveting Salieri two years ago in the Aurora Fox's Amadeus. But Walton's special gift is for directing. He h...

    on June 12, 1997
  • Article

    Crack Pots

    The fine arts almost never get sucked into mass culture's real Internet--television. And when art does land in the TV spotlight, it usually suffers. Typically, there are three circumstances in which an event in the world of the visual arts will ...

    by Michael Paglia on June 5, 1997
  • Article

    Czar Talk

    The best comedies are serious business. The whole spectrum of human frailty is meat and drink for the great comic writers, and it takes a profound intelligence to make us laugh at human beastliness. Nikolay Vasilyevich Gogol, a nineteenth-century Rus...

    on June 5, 1997
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From the Print Edition

Animal Crackers is a crack-up at the Denver Center

The musical Animal Crackers, starring the Marx Brothers, debuted on Broadway in 1928 and was filmed a couple of years later. It's a romp, a trifle — full of puns,… More >>

Lauri Lynnxe Murphy returns with Nest/Shed at Mai Wyn Fine Art

Lauri Lynnxe Murphy is well known here, having established her name as both an artist and an art advocate over the past two decades. But she fell off the radar… More >>

Now Showing

1959. Dean Sobel, director of the Clyfford Still Museum, is the host curator for Modern Masters at the Denver Art Museum, and he's done a companion exhibit at his own… More >>

Now Playing

And the Sun Stood Still. The shining strength of Dava Sobel's And the Sun Stood Still is that, at a time when the sciences have been so muddied by sloppy… More >>

Modern Masters at the DAM shines with star power

Denver Art Museum director Christoph Heinrich has a gift for understanding how to attract an audience. His secret is presenting exhibits that appeal not only to the art crowd, but… More >>

Judy Garland's singing is the pot of gold at The End of the Rainbow

I walked into the Arvada Center for the Judy Garland bio-play-musical End of the Rainbow thinking about the intense gay identification with such icons as Judy Garland, Edith Piaf and… More >>

Home is where the art is in The Road to Mecca

Athol Fugard's The Road to Mecca, currently playing at Miners Alley, explores huge and unanswerable questions: questions about age, death, love and trust, the meaning of home and the significance… More >>

Now Showing

Critical Focus: Ian Fisher. This show, located in the informal Whole Room at MCA Denver, is made up of a group of mostly monumental paintings of the sky. It's the… More >>

Dava Sobel's And the Sun Stood Still shines at BETC

The shining strength of Dava Sobel's And the Sun Stood Still — which is currently receiving its world premiere in Boulder — is that, at a time when the sciences… More >>

Print works take center stage at Goodwin Fine Art

Mo'Print, the Month of Printmaking, is winding down, and although the centerpiece is the Open Press show at the McNichols Building, there have been dozens of other events focused on… More >>

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