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  • Article

    Tex Nix

    If you're like most people, chances are there's a situation from your past, oft-told at small gatherings, that has always seemed worthy to you of dramatization. "After all," you say to yourself after having regaled a cozy audience of acquaintances wi...

    by Jim Lillie on October 2, 1997
  • Article

    Immigrant's Song

    "I want to yell things in newspapers," one character says in Leslie Ayvazian's play Nine Armenians. The granddaughter of a prominent minister who fled his native Armenia for freedom in America, she intends to tell anyone who will listen that her peop...

    by Jim Lillie on October 2, 1997
  • Article

    Small World

    It's no surprise that the name Arthur Szyk is unfamiliar. And not just because of all those consonants. First, Szyk's chosen forms of expression--miniature painting, illustration and illumination--are hardly the kinds of things that lead to fame...

    by Michael Paglia on September 25, 1997
  • Article

    Class Struggle

    By the time the curtain falls on David Mamet's Oleanna, you're likely to have changed your mind several times about whose side is more "right" in the two-character drama. You're also bound to gain new insight into a misunderstood, sometimes-maligned ...

    by Jim Lillie on September 25, 1997
  • Article

    Touch and Gogh

    Shouldering the tools of his trade, a gaunt figure walks on to the stage, opens his artist's easel and begins to paint. He dons a hat emblazoned with burning candles that set his canvas aglow, while a backdrop reflects dual self-portraits of the man'...

    by Jim Lillie on September 25, 1997
  • Article

    Not the Funnies

    Comics and the fine arts have overlapped "back as far as Hogarth," muses Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art director Cydney Payton. "Maybe even further back," chimes in Barbara Shark, chairman of the BMoCA board. Payton and Shark are talking about th...

    by Michael Paglia on September 18, 1997
  • Article

    Stage Rites

    Plays about the theater have enjoyed a healthy success for at least 2,500 years, ever since Greek dramas were followed on the day's bill of fare by comedies that made fun of the serious action preceding them. Somehow, audiences never tire of listenin...

    by Jim Lillie on September 18, 1997
  • Article

    Puttin' on the Hits

    A few years from now, an enterprising promoter is going to reap a considerable fortune repackaging the hits of, say, Madonna, Michael Jackson and Lyle Lovett. But the show won't be sold to American audiences by sending it out on the usual concert cir...

    by Jim Lillie on September 18, 1997
  • Article

    Painting the Town Red

    "It was a hell of a decision to make," says director Paul Hughes. "This is my life. The gallery is my identity." But even so, Hughes is closing Inkfish Gallery, his life for over twenty years, at the end of the month. Back in 1975, Hughes was th...

    by Michael Paglia on September 11, 1997
  • Article

    The Harried Experiment

    Something has happened to the experimental theater. Time was when an alternative-theater piece was certain to be as iconoclastic as it was entertaining--when performance pieces opposed in form and content to mainstream theater practices and conve...

    by Jim Lillie on September 11, 1997
  • Article

    Fall Colors

    Painting is a very old-fashioned method of making art. After all, it's been around for at least 15,000 years (as proven by cave paintings). Astoundingly, over those years painting has changed very little, except in terms of style. Otherwise, it's don...

    by Michael Paglia on September 4, 1997
  • Article

    New From New Mexico

    New Mexico's centuries-long traditions in the fine arts cast a deep shadow over Colorado art, both for better and for worse. It's not that we don't have our own strong traditions, particularly in painting and printmaking. It's just that there's so mu...

    by Michael Paglia on August 28, 1997
  • Article

    Fresh Heirs

    The world of contemporary art has seen some bad days in the 1990s. It all started when an economic slump brought the art boom of the 1980s to a crashing halt in New York City, the epicenter of the global market. The severity of the resulting free...

    by Michael Paglia on August 14, 1997
  • Article

    A Perfect Match

    The hottest thing in Lanford Wilson's Burn This, now at the Acoma Center, are the performances. The crack cast assembled by Curious Productions is so at home on stage that it's a privilege to watch it work. Under the savvy direction of Kathryn Maes, ...

    on August 14, 1997
  • Article

    Musical Cheers

    Think about it: Musicals are absurd. The minimal plots coast along on thin ice and then, suddenly, for no good reason, somebody erupts into song. The music is usually as thin as the plot line, and the characterizations are really about striking appro...

    on August 14, 1997
  • Article

    Gallery Talk

    When we tuned in last fall, there were two groups vying to open a new museum in Denver dedicated to contemporary art. One group included such well-known Denver artists as Dale Chisman, Mark Sink and Linde Schlumbohm. This group dubbed itself "CoMoCA,...

    by Michael Paglia on August 7, 1997
  • Article

    A Simple Pleasure

    Playwright Tom Donaghy's Minutes From the Blue Route offers a surprisingly tender, conciliatory look at a mildly dysfunctional family. And with its production of the piece, the Boulder Repertory Company has once again distinguished itself as a troupe...

    on August 7, 1997
  • Article

    Hollywood and Vain

    Playwright David Mamet's remarkable Speed-the-Plow is as true to the contemporary American cityscape as an Edward Hopper painting. Mamet's tough-mouthed dialogue--always a series of interruptions and eruptions--falls with an intoxicating rhythm on th...

    on August 7, 1997
  • Article

    Summer Vocations

    For many years, the exhibition calendar in the art world featured a preordained hierarchy of shows. In the fall, galleries, museums and other venues presented their most important events. Then, special exhibits launched the winter holiday season. The...

    by Michael Paglia on July 31, 1997
  • Article

    Ebony and Irony

    A new theater company has just arrived in Denver with a hot agenda and a cool style: Shadow Theatre Company is intent on bringing more plays by African-American playwrights to the boards. And if its first production, Innocent Thoughts, by William Dow...

    on July 31, 1997
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The Queer Warriors fight for video-game redemption at Boystown The Queer Warriors fight for video-game redemption at Boystown

"Sometimes we itch all over. We think it's because of the gas leak," says Timmy Moen, a lanky 27-year-old with bloodshot eyes glued to League of Legends, a multiplayer video… More >>

Chuck Forsman goes solo at the DAM and Robischon Chuck Forsman goes solo at the DAM and Robischon

Although it gets plenty of attention for blockbusters like Modern Masters, the Denver Art Museum always has a raft of smaller shows on display as well. Right now there are… More >>

Spamalot is on a holy quest for laughs at the Aurora Fox

Spamalot is a terrific musical, a hilarious romp through English myth and history — and a fine Aurora Fox production underlines its strengths. The fabled King Arthur sets forth accompanied… More >>

Now Showing

1959. Dean Sobel, director of the Clyfford Still Museum, is the host curator for Modern Masters at the Denver Art Museum, and he's done a companion exhibit at his own… More >>

Now Playing

Animal Crackers. Animal Crackers is a romp, a trifle — full of puns, malapropisms and visual jokes, and utterly, unabashedly silly. The plot is just an excuse for the crazy… More >>

Animal Crackers is a crack-up at the Denver Center

The musical Animal Crackers, starring the Marx Brothers, debuted on Broadway in 1928 and was filmed a couple of years later. It's a romp, a trifle — full of puns,… More >>

Lauri Lynnxe Murphy returns with Nest/Shed at Mai Wyn Fine Art

Lauri Lynnxe Murphy is well known here, having established her name as both an artist and an art advocate over the past two decades. But she fell off the radar… More >>

Now Showing

1959. Dean Sobel, director of the Clyfford Still Museum, is the host curator for Modern Masters at the Denver Art Museum, and he's done a companion exhibit at his own… More >>

Now Playing

And the Sun Stood Still. The shining strength of Dava Sobel's And the Sun Stood Still is that, at a time when the sciences have been so muddied by sloppy… More >>

Modern Masters at the DAM shines with star power

Denver Art Museum director Christoph Heinrich has a gift for understanding how to attract an audience. His secret is presenting exhibits that appeal not only to the art crowd, but… More >>

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