<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  169  |  ...  |  338  |  ...  |  507  |  ...  |  595  |  596  |  597  |  ...  |  676  |  ...  |  679  |  Next Page >> 11901 - 11920 of 13580

  • Article

    Now Showing

    Balance. On the West Ninth Avenue side of Fresh Art, the Mayor's Office of Economic Development has paid for a tiny sculpture garden as part of the long, ongoing Santa Fe Drive beautification project. The garden, composed of a group of rectangular f...

    on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Musical Mimicry - Cookin' at the Cookery offers a bland take on a salty singer.

    Singer Alberta Hunter had an extraordinary life. At age twelve, she left her Memphis home for Chicago, where she got her start at a rough club called Dago Frank's. She moved to New York City in the 1920s and became part of the Harlem Renaissance alon...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Power Pinter - Puzzling No Man's Land remains emotionally grounded.

    We go to a play by Harold Pinter with certain expectations. We expect ambiguity, eloquent silences, language used like a scalpel or to parody literary convention and ordinary use. There won't be a plot, and the action will be puzzling, but it will in...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Beast on the Moon. The year is 1921. Aram Tomasian, a survivor of the 1915 massacre of Armenians by the Turks, is trying to make a life for himself in Milwaukee. He has bought himself a picture bride, a fifteen-year-old orphan called Seta. Aram is y...

    on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Fab Film - Forty years ago, Al Maysles met the Beatles.

    Albert Maysles, with brother David, made two different films about two different rock-and-roll bands five years apart, but to this day he can't think of one without immediately thinking of the other. The first he was shooting 40 years ago this very...

    by Robert Wilonsky on February 19, 2004
  • Article

    Political Cartoons - African-American art is up at DU, while Mizel surveys the Jewish roots of the comics.

    Using politics to create art requires a skill for balancing aesthetics with philosophy, since political artwork must be visually successful while also conveying a message. The problem is that most artists can't pull it off -- something that's very ap...

    by Michael Paglia on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Balance. On the West Ninth Avenue side of Fresh Art, the Mayor's Office of Economic Development has paid for a tiny sculpture garden as part of the long, ongoing Santa Fe Drive beautification project. The garden, composed of a group of rectangular f...

    on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    It's no secret that the alternative scene in Denver has been pretty flat for the past couple of years. But it looks as though Edge Gallery (3658 Navajo Street, 303-477-7173), an artists' cooperative, is forging a path out of these woods. Since the be...

    by Michael Paglia on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Catfight Night - Arvada's revival of The Women isn't worth the fuss.

    Claire Boothe Luce's The Women was recently revived at the Roundabout Theatre in New York, a production I happened to catch one evening on television. It featured Cynthia Nixon, best known as Miranda in Sex and the City, as the wronged wife Mary Hain...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Blast From the Past - DCTC's adaptation of John Brown's Body stands tall.

    John Brown's Body isn't exactly a play; it doesn't have one absorbing plot line. Instead, it's an adaptation of Stephen Vincent Bent's famous 1928 epic poem about the Civil War, and, like all epics, it's a kind of episodic tapestry. There's chanting...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Beast on the Moon. The year is 1921. Aram Tomasian, a survivor of the 1915 massacre of Armenians by the Turks, is trying to make a life for himself in Milwaukee. He has bought himself a picture bride, a fifteen-year-old orphan called Seta. Aram is y...

    on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    The Hard Sell - Local filmmaker Shane Carruth won Sundance's top honor. So...now what?

    It was only a few days ago that Shane Carruth, software engineer-turned-filmmaker, was ready to walk away from the money on the table and keep his movie--78 minutes' worth of cheapo celluloid that had, in a Utah instant, become as valuable as strands...

    by Robert Wilonsky on February 12, 2004
  • Article

    The Clays of Our Lives - It's pottery by Picasso at the CVA, plus ceramics and more at Havu.

    Pablo Picasso had a long life -- he died in 1973 at age 92 -- and during his epic career, he made a number of key stylistic breakthroughs essential to the development of modern art. He was on the ground floor of cubism and surrealism and, come to thi...

    by Michael Paglia on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Ivar Zeile, previously with the Cordell Taylor Gallery, which has closed, and Ron Judish, the director of the gone-but-not-forgotten Judish Fine Arts, have together launched the city's newest art hot spot, (+) Zeile/Judish Gallery (2350 Lawrence Stre...

    by Michael Paglia on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    Now Showing

    Balance. On the West 11th Avenue side of Fresh Art, the Mayor's Office of Economic Development has paid for a tiny sculpture garden as part of the long, ongoing Santa Fe Drive beautification project. The garden, composed of a group of rectangular fo...

    on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    Silence Isn't Golden - Bas Bleu's Beast on the Moon exposes the torment of an almost-forgotten tragedy.

    The year is 1921. Aram Tomasian, a survivor of the 1915 massacre of Armenians by the Turks, is trying to make a life for himself in Milwaukee. He has bought himself a picture bride, a fifteen-year-old orphan called Seta. Aram is young, but he's rigid...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    God's in the Details - Visiting Mr. Green soars on subtle, super acting.

    I enjoyed almost every moment of Visiting Mr. Green, but the title character's Russian-style glass teacups disarmed me completely. During my teens, my Hungarian stepfather used to bring me tea with whiskey, lemon and honey in just such a cup whenever...

    by Juliet Wittman on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    Encore

    Bright Ideas. Bright Ideas is about a couple who will do anything to get their toddler into the best kindergarten in town. This could be a vacuous sitcom premise, but for the most part it's attacked with savage humor, leavened by moments of dazed em...

    on February 5, 2004
  • Article

    Hot and Cool - Abstract sculptures and paintings look good at Walker and Fresh Art.

    It's surprising, yet it's all but official: Walker Fine Art has established a place for itself at the main table of contemporary art in Denver. True, it hasn't quite reached the top tier of local venues, but it's only one level down from it -- pretty...

    by Michael Paglia on January 29, 2004
  • Article

    Artbeat - Brief sketches of what's happening in the Denver art scene.

    Mark Sink, who runs Gallery Sink (2301 West 30th Avenue, 303-455-0185), has organized Staged Fantasy, an exhibit of posed photos by an assortment of contemporary photographers. A lot of the work relates to Sink's own efforts, which, though not includ...

    by Michael Paglia on January 29, 2004
<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  169  |  ...  |  338  |  ...  |  507  |  ...  |  595  |  596  |  597  |  ...  |  676  |  ...  |  679  |  Next Page >> 11901 - 11920 of 13580
Denver Concert Tickets

Find an Arts Event

Loading...