<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  161  |  ...  |  322  |  ...  |  483  |  ...  |  607  |  608  |  609  |  ...  |  644  |  645  |  Next Page >> 12141 - 12160 of 12882

  • Article

    The Shock of the Now

    As we near the end of the 1900s, it's interesting to notice that the world of the visual arts is wide open, with a staggering profusion of artistic visions. Quite literally, anything goes. There are so many competing styles, ranging from straight tra...

    by Michael Paglia on June 10, 1999
  • Article

    To the Max

    The Rule Modern and Contemporary Gallery is currently featuring the compelling show Carl Andre and Melissa Kretschmer, which pairs a handful of Andre's recent sculptures with Kretschmer's hard-edged tar-on-glass paintings. Both artists share basic ae...

    by Michael Paglia on June 3, 1999
  • Article

    The Mother Load

    Although this year's Colorado Women Playwrights' Festival explores unsettling and disturbing subjects, the first of two festival programs marks a significant improvement over last season's feeble offerings. Despite a few logistical headaches (like st...

    by Jim Lillie on June 3, 1999
  • Article

    Pride of Place

    Since relocating to the Golden Triangle from LoDo last fall, the William Havu Gallery (formerly the 1/1 Gallery) has greatly expanded its stable of artists. Among the recently snagged talents are those of husband-and-wife painting team Tracy and Sush...

    by Michael Paglia on May 27, 1999
  • Article

    Mind Over Manor

    The Morrison Theatre's unflinching production of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest starts the minute theatergoers enter the cozy town hall that serves as the community group's performing space. As Lawrence Welk-like tunes play in the background, the pa...

    by Jim Lillie on May 27, 1999
  • Article

    Don't Flinch

    Much of the public discussion concerning the Columbine High School massacre has swirled about in a cauldron of controversy. The memorial service was too secular, too religious or too political. Howard Stern's incendiary (and stupid) remarks were seen...

    by Jim Lillie on May 27, 1999
  • Article

    Mixed Doubles

    Dave Yust: Diptychs 1968-99, which closes this weekend at the Curfman Gallery on the Colorado State University campus in Fort Collins, is a stunning examination of the work of one of the state's most important contemporary artists. Yust, who teaches ...

    by Michael Paglia on May 20, 1999
  • Article

    A Day at the Scheme Park

    Midway through Act One of Kingdom, it becomes clear that Richard Hellensen's play about a corrupt theme-park company is as much an indictment of popular taste as it is a rebuke of the soulless purveyors of mass-merchandised shlock. Bringing to mind t...

    by Jim Lillie on May 20, 1999
  • Article

    They Have His Number

    Guido Contini's inability to separate his art from his personal life is what both tortures and inspires him--at least that's what he maintains throughout the musical Nine. The brilliant Italian filmmaker freely admits that his insatiable appetite for...

    by Jim Lillie on May 20, 1999
  • Article

    Crossed Borders

    The normally staid Museo de las Americas, on Santa Fe Drive, is now hosting Los Supersonicos: Two Chicanos Zoom Into the New Millennium, a raucous contemporary exhibit filled with humorous political commentary in the form of irreverent paintings, pri...

    by Michael Paglia on May 13, 1999
  • Article

    The Hollywood Shuffle

    Oozing with oily arrogance, a cutthroat movie executive explains to a budding screenwriter that his script about two gay men dying of AIDS isn't likely to play well in middle America. Like Tootsie and Terms of Endearment, he says, such fare can be di...

    by Jim Lillie on May 13, 1999
  • Article

    Star-Crossed Blunders

    Despite an ominous, foreboding prologue, a powerful final scene and several impressive performances, Opera Colorado's production of Gounod's Romeo and Juliet is plagued by the same sort of clumsy staging, static crowd scenes and uninspired acting tha...

    by Jim Lillie on May 13, 1999
  • Article

    Mud and Guts

    More than any other medium, ceramics has achieved a high level of artistic development in Colorado. The glorious early history of ceramics here was partly determined by the availability of high-quality clay. Beginning in the 1890s, potters from ...

    by Michael Paglia on May 6, 1999
  • Article

    Sins of the Mother

    Many contemporary adaptations of Greek tragedies, such as Jean Anouilh's Antigone, effectively use ancient myths to address modern problems. In fact, when it was first produced in 1944, the French dramatist's modern-dress tale about a woman who defie...

    by Jim Lillie on May 6, 1999
  • Article

    A Sad Song

    "I may be eccentric," Alma Winemiller tells the man she has always loved from afar, "but not so eccentric that I don't have the ordinary human need for love." A few moments later, John Buchanan Jr., who has known Alma since they were children in Glor...

    by Jim Lillie on May 6, 1999
  • Article

    One-Stop Viewing

    Cydney Payton, the director of the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art, has little trouble filling the place with exciting exhibits. In fact, she's crammed so much into BMoCA that one of the four current shows, Housed, begins not in the museum, but on...

    by Michael Paglia on April 29, 1999
  • Article

    Flesh Wounds

    A black-and-white-striped uniform draping his stooped frame, a bespectacled prisoner wavers between capitulation and defiance as he impersonates Shylock in a production of Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice that's being presented before a group of ...

    by Jim Lillie on April 29, 1999
  • Article

    Real Life Drama

    If, like the ancient Greeks who started the world's first dramatic festivals, you're a firm believer in the healing power of art, then the musical Blood Brothers might serve as something of a cathartic experience in the aftermath of last week's calam...

    by Jim Lillie on April 29, 1999
  • Article

    Short Subject

    Over the past twenty years, blockbuster shows have become a necessary evil at museums. When they succeed--and they usually do, at least financially--they increase attendance, and that's the bottom line in the exhibition business. But while they may a...

    by Michael Paglia on April 22, 1999
  • Article

    Criticize This!

    Playwrights have been turning the tables on their critics ever since Athenian dramatists parodied one another's efforts 2,500 years ago. Whether being skewered by eighteenth-century British wit Richard Brinsley Sheridan (The Critic), lampooned by con...

    by Jim Lillie on April 22, 1999
<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  161  |  ...  |  322  |  ...  |  483  |  ...  |  607  |  608  |  609  |  ...  |  644  |  645  |  Next Page >> 12141 - 12160 of 12882
Denver Concert Tickets

Find an Arts Event

From the Print Edition

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

Representational imagery shines at Havu

Rather than throw together a group show featuring work by artists whose work is unconnected, for its current exhibit, Articulated Perspectives, the William Havu Gallery focused on four artists who… More >>

Rajiv Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries is a cut above

Jamie Wollrab works in Los Angeles as a director, actor and acting coach, but he grew up in Boulder and loves Colorado. "My family lives here," he says, "and they… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Chris Richter. Back in March, gallery director Bobbi Walker realized that her planned June slot had come apart and that she needed to come up with somebody fast. At the… More >>

Loading...