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  • Article

    Green Eggs and Hams

    Theodor Seuss Geisel won a pair of Academy awards for writing Design for Death, a 1947 film documentary about Japanese warlords, and Gerald McBoing Boing, a 1950 animated cartoon. But he was better known as Dr. Seuss, the prolific author who launched...

    by Jim Lillie on December 24, 1998
  • Article

    Dancing on Her Grave

    Human beings have reveled in the mocking of solemnity as early as the twelfth century, when subversive subdeacons rang church bells improperly as part of the annual Feast of Fools and food-fighting choir boys mischievously sang out of tune during the...

    by Jim Lillie on December 24, 1998
  • Article

    Focus Group

    Perhaps because of its majestic scenery, or maybe because the skies are not cloudy all day, Colorado has become, in the twentieth century, an important regional center for fine-art photography. What's most remarkable about this wonderful state of aff...

    by Michael Paglia on December 17, 1998
  • Article

    Paid in Full

    Acutely aware that society routinely champions mendacity in matters of art, beauty and truth, the Lower East Side slackers in the musical Rent harbor no illusions about their place in the world. They'll never be invited to place their names in the so...

    by Jim Lillie on December 17, 1998
  • Article

    To All a Good Night

    Its yearly appearance might be anticipated, dreaded or even lampooned, but Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol remains the quintessential holiday story about the transformative powers of love, forgiveness and redemption. Director Laird Williamson has...

    by Jim Lillie on December 17, 1998
  • Article

    New and Improved

    A couple of weeks ago, a group exhibit called Views of Solitude opened and thus served as the premier display of the brand-new William Havu Gallery. The show and, even more so, the gallery itself, elicited audible gasps from many of the more than 500...

    by Michael Paglia on December 10, 1998
  • Article

    Rock of New Ages

    Are the crystal-arranging rituals of gong-happy new-agers really any different from the solemn-voiced genuflecting that undergirds the world's established blood religions? Does our willingness to profess unwavering belief--whether in the rock of ages...

    by Jim Lillie on December 10, 1998
  • Article

    Dead Man Laughing

    On the surface, Beth Henley's The Wake of Jamey Foster looks like a typical American dysfunctional-family play. In fact, before Act One is twenty minutes old, we've become acquainted with an undiscovered ectomorphic genius who makes a living cashing ...

    by Jim Lillie on December 10, 1998
  • Article

    Panoramic Views

    For its holiday offering, LoDo's Robischon Gallery has teamed up a pair of disparate shows that together give viewers some sense of the pluralism reigning at the end of this century. In the series of rooms that make up the gallery's main space, ...

    by Michael Paglia on December 3, 1998
  • Article

    All Tapped Out

    Near the end of Riverdance--The Show, there's a brief yet moving scene that beautifully clarifies and unifies all thirteen of the Irish dance extravaganza's far-flung episodes. To the bow-shredding accompaniment of a lone violinist, the fervent compa...

    by Jim Lillie on December 3, 1998
  • Article

    Clueless in America

    Setting his huckster's sights on no less a prize than the United States presidency, a slick-talking loudmouth unabashedly declares, "Truth is in the eye of the beholder or the mouth of the seller." Before his TV-reporter girlfriend can convince him o...

    by Jim Lillie on December 3, 1998
  • Article

    All Aboard

    In the expansive Hamilton Galleries on the first floor of the Denver Art Museum is a glorious show, Inventing the Southwest: The Fred Harvey Company and Native American Art, which highlights a dazzling array of American Indian art. The Fred Harvey Co...

    by Michael Paglia on November 26, 1998
  • Article

    What We're Made Of

    What, exactly, constitutes our national character? Are we largely the sum of our popularly determined and time-tested beliefs? Or is our collective psyche a more mercurial interfusion of passionate and ephemeral desires? Before you get all centrist-m...

    by Jim Lillie on November 26, 1998
  • Article

    Piss and Vinegar

    Ron Judish Fine Arts, which opened just this past spring, has already distinguished itself as one of the city's finest commercial galleries. But the current Judish show, Andres Serrano: A Survey, which sketches out the career of one of the nation's m...

    by Michael Paglia on November 19, 1998
  • Article

    Demons at Work

    Soon after Tennessee Williams finished writing his last great play, The Night of the Iguana, in 1961, America's preeminent dramatic poet plunged into a severe decline marked by acute drug and alcohol dependency, extended periods of mental illness for...

    by Jim Lillie on November 19, 1998
  • Article

    Jogging for Life

    For a touchy-feely play written at the beginning of America's politically correct modern age, Michael Brady's To Gillian on Her 37th Birthday is surprisingly humorous, delightfully risque and impishly entertaining. The romantic drama about a strong-w...

    by Jim Lillie on November 19, 1998
  • Article

    Signed, Sealed, Delivered

    With the grand opening of the much-anticipated Denver Pavilions adjacent to the Adam's Mark Hotel addition that was completed last year, it's now official: The three blocks that line the south side of the 16th Street Mall between Court Place and Welt...

    by Michael Paglia on November 12, 1998
  • Article

    Truth to Power

    Against the sounds of clicking typewriter keys, a disembodied voice tells us that Voices From the Soul is dedicated to "the brother on the corner who never had a chance." As the stage lights slowly illuminate several cardboard silhouettes that rep...

    by Jim Lillie on November 12, 1998
  • Article

    Who's to Blame?

    Given that the potty-mouthed characters in playwright Chay Yew's Porcelain have little trouble posing a myriad of pointed questions --"Have you ever participated in toilet sex?" is fairly typical of the blunt-force dialogue--you'd think Yew's one-act...

    by Jim Lillie on November 12, 1998
  • Article

    The Posada Adventure

    In the last decade or so, the Mexican religious holiday El Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) has not only been observed in Denver's large Hispanic community, but it has also become a marked occasion for celebration in the city's art world. This is...

    by Michael Paglia on November 5, 1998
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From the Print Edition

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

Representational imagery shines at Havu

Rather than throw together a group show featuring work by artists whose work is unconnected, for its current exhibit, Articulated Perspectives, the William Havu Gallery focused on four artists who… More >>

Rajiv Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries is a cut above

Jamie Wollrab works in Los Angeles as a director, actor and acting coach, but he grew up in Boulder and loves Colorado. "My family lives here," he says, "and they… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Chris Richter. Back in March, gallery director Bobbi Walker realized that her planned June slot had come apart and that she needed to come up with somebody fast. At the… More >>

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