<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  160  |  ...  |  320  |  ...  |  480  |  ...  |  615  |  616  |  617  |  ...  |  640  |  ...  |  643  |  Next Page >> 12301 - 12320 of 12856

  • Article

    The New Christie Minstrels

    As murder mysteries go, the Country Dinner Playhouse staging of Agatha Christie's The Hollow has much to recommend it. Bill McHale's well-directed show features a stellar cast of veteran actors. What's more, superb costumes from Nicole Hoof and a tas...

    by Jim Lillie on January 22, 1998
  • Article

    Soul on Ice

    Ask a professor of ancient history for an explanation of the architectural history of theaters, and he might tell you the large, circular dancing space that is the centerpiece of all Greek theaters took its inspiration from the threshing circles that...

    by Jim Lillie on January 22, 1998
  • Article

    Of Mice and Men

    New York-based artist and author Art Spiegelman is among the most important contemporary cartoonists in the world. And his considerable fame is based almost wholly on Maus, a sometimes hard-bound comic book first published in 1986 by Pantheon Books. ...

    by Michael Paglia on January 15, 1998
  • Article

    Pinter Fest

    British playwright Harold Pinter once confessed that his ear for dialogue is something of an acquired talent: He gleans some of his material from conversations overheard in bars and restaurants. In that respect, he's not much different from many othe...

    by Jim Lillie on January 15, 1998
  • Article

    Tour 'Da Force

    The overwhelming success of the Broadway tap-dance extravaganza, Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk might disappoint, dismay or even shock some musical-theater purists: There's no Fred Astaire clone as the show's main character. Instead, the unort...

    by Jim Lillie on January 15, 1998
  • Article

    Salon Selective

    Mark Sink is both a prominent Denver photographer and a member of a prominent local family. That explains why he's a tuxedo-clad semi-regular on the society pages of the city's dailies, typically seen in photographs with one or the other of his divor...

    by Michael Paglia on January 8, 1998
  • Article

    Getting a Clue

    "Get yourself some puppets, put 'em on ice skates, and you'll be a millionaire," laments one character in the Avenue Theater's interactive murder mystery Murder Most Fowl, a nine-year-old production that annually lampoons local celebrities and events...

    by Jim Lillie on January 8, 1998
  • Article

    Something New

    Why does Denver need yet another theater company? What can a new group producing plays in a downtown storefront theater offer us that older, more established theaters aren't already providing? People once asked those same questions about Chicago...

    by Jim Lillie on January 8, 1998
  • Article

    One Thumb Up

    Contemporary playwrights face the same nagging question each time they write a script: Should it be a comedy, a tragedy or a dogmatic disaster-documentary? The latter is mostly the accepted province of Hollywood, and the only form of tragedy that see...

    by Jim Lillie on January 1, 1998
  • Article

    What a Dog

    Last year 28 of America's regional theaters presented A.R. Gurney's comedy Sylvia, giving it the dubious distinction of being the most-produced play of the professional theater season apart from holiday regulars such as A Christmas Carol. There's an ...

    by Jim Lillie on January 1, 1998
  • Article

    The Fortunes of War

    If things had gone slightly differently on the night of December 22, 1989, the Denver Art Museum's current show Old Masters Brought to Light: European Paintings From the National Museum of Art of Romania would never have happened. Because that night,...

    by Michael Paglia on December 25, 1997
  • Article

    Amen to That

    The violence that engulfed America shortly after the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy is well-documented. What isn't as well known is that many churches responded to the unrest by pulling together in a unique and effecti...

    by Jim Lillie on December 25, 1997
  • Article

    Hayley's Comet

    Suppose you have a few million dollars to invest in The King and I. Naturally, you want to create a touring production of the highest quality, but you're also concerned about turning a profit. What you need is some sort of guarantee that will elimina...

    by Jim Lillie on December 25, 1997
  • Article

    Through the Past, Deftly

    The Colorado History Museum's new exhibit on the 1960s and '70s is filled with contradictions. It's elegant in places, crude elsewhere; there are joyful moments and sad ones. And conveying these contradictions is exactly what the show's principal org...

    by Michael Paglia on December 18, 1997
  • Article

    The Pizza Man Cometh

    No matter how hard playwright Eugene O'Neill tried to distance himself from his anguished past, the personal demons of his family life continued to hound the great writer until his death in 1953. He passed on his obsession to his widow, Carlotta, ins...

    by Jim Lillie on December 18, 1997
  • Article

    The Dead Zone

    The closing moments of CityStage Ensemble's production of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead are ripe for a rendition of "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen." After all, director Dan Hiester bills his production as "[British playwright Tom] Stoppard's co...

    by Jim Lillie on December 18, 1997
  • Article

    Changing Scenes

    LoDo's been a work in progress for a long time. Torn-up streets and sidewalks have been a neighborhood standard for the past decade--as have those many hooded parking meters around the ubiquitous construction zones. But nothing's been worse than...

    by Michael Paglia on December 11, 1997
  • Article

    Wishing Upon a Star

    Actor's Studio founder and Broadway director Robert Lewis wrote in his memoirs about a 1931 exchange he had with a then-unknown Katharine Hepburn. Lewis was working for the legendary Group Theatre, an American ensemble that emulated the venerable Mos...

    by Jim Lillie on December 11, 1997
  • Article

    Dead Reckoning

    Plays about death understandably are not very popular. True, the occasional one does stimulate some thoughtful discussion among theatergoers. And when given national exposure, such as the kind Michael Cristofer's The Shadow Box attained when Paul New...

    by Jim Lillie on December 11, 1997
  • Article

    View Finders

    It's been a hectic few weeks for Carol Keller, director of the Emmanuel Gallery on the Auraria campus. When she hasn't been scrambling to protect a permanent collection of photographs from art thieves, she's been pulling a few capers of her own--in h...

    by Michael Paglia on December 4, 1997
<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  160  |  ...  |  320  |  ...  |  480  |  ...  |  615  |  616  |  617  |  ...  |  640  |  ...  |  643  |  Next Page >> 12301 - 12320 of 12856
Denver Concert Tickets

Find an Arts Event

From the Print Edition

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

Representational imagery shines at Havu

Rather than throw together a group show featuring work by artists whose work is unconnected, for its current exhibit, Articulated Perspectives, the William Havu Gallery focused on four artists who… More >>

Rajiv Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries is a cut above

Jamie Wollrab works in Los Angeles as a director, actor and acting coach, but he grew up in Boulder and loves Colorado. "My family lives here," he says, "and they… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Chris Richter. Back in March, gallery director Bobbi Walker realized that her planned June slot had come apart and that she needed to come up with somebody fast. At the… More >>

Loading...