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  • Article

    Amen to That

    The violence that engulfed America shortly after the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy is well-documented. What isn't as well known is that many churches responded to the unrest by pulling together in a unique and effecti...

    by Jim Lillie on December 25, 1997
  • Article

    Hayley's Comet

    Suppose you have a few million dollars to invest in The King and I. Naturally, you want to create a touring production of the highest quality, but you're also concerned about turning a profit. What you need is some sort of guarantee that will elimina...

    by Jim Lillie on December 25, 1997
  • Article

    Through the Past, Deftly

    The Colorado History Museum's new exhibit on the 1960s and '70s is filled with contradictions. It's elegant in places, crude elsewhere; there are joyful moments and sad ones. And conveying these contradictions is exactly what the show's principal org...

    by Michael Paglia on December 18, 1997
  • Article

    The Pizza Man Cometh

    No matter how hard playwright Eugene O'Neill tried to distance himself from his anguished past, the personal demons of his family life continued to hound the great writer until his death in 1953. He passed on his obsession to his widow, Carlotta, ins...

    by Jim Lillie on December 18, 1997
  • Article

    The Dead Zone

    The closing moments of CityStage Ensemble's production of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead are ripe for a rendition of "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen." After all, director Dan Hiester bills his production as "[British playwright Tom] Stoppard's co...

    by Jim Lillie on December 18, 1997
  • Article

    Changing Scenes

    LoDo's been a work in progress for a long time. Torn-up streets and sidewalks have been a neighborhood standard for the past decade--as have those many hooded parking meters around the ubiquitous construction zones. But nothing's been worse than...

    by Michael Paglia on December 11, 1997
  • Article

    Wishing Upon a Star

    Actor's Studio founder and Broadway director Robert Lewis wrote in his memoirs about a 1931 exchange he had with a then-unknown Katharine Hepburn. Lewis was working for the legendary Group Theatre, an American ensemble that emulated the venerable Mos...

    by Jim Lillie on December 11, 1997
  • Article

    Dead Reckoning

    Plays about death understandably are not very popular. True, the occasional one does stimulate some thoughtful discussion among theatergoers. And when given national exposure, such as the kind Michael Cristofer's The Shadow Box attained when Paul New...

    by Jim Lillie on December 11, 1997
  • Article

    View Finders

    It's been a hectic few weeks for Carol Keller, director of the Emmanuel Gallery on the Auraria campus. When she hasn't been scrambling to protect a permanent collection of photographs from art thieves, she's been pulling a few capers of her own--in h...

    by Michael Paglia on December 4, 1997
  • Article

    A Good Joe

    Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat is an ideal microcosm of the contemporary Broadway musical. It's based on a story written by someone else (the complete text may be found in the Book of Genesis, Chapters 37 through 50); it borrows from se...

    by Jim Lillie on December 4, 1997
  • Article

    Wedding Bell Blahs

    Thirty years ago, Richard Schechner created the Performance Group in New York, an avant-garde company whose shows were riveting because of their carefully rehearsed spontaneity. What was important in Schechner's productions was the unpredictable seri...

    by Jim Lillie on December 4, 1997
  • Article

    High Hopes

    Just in time for the holidays, the Denver Art Museum has raised the curtain on its seven-year, $7.5 million facelift. Judging by the crowds--more than 13,000 visitors showed up on the first weekend alone--many people have found it worth the wait. But...

    by Michael Paglia on November 27, 1997
  • Article

    Lone Rangers

    Give Barbara Walters credit. Or maybe it's Sigmund Freud who deserves the accolades. While we're at it, let's not forget the hordes of celebrities now clamoring to publish their memoirs or autobiographies. All of them must be taken into consideration...

    by Jim Lillie on November 27, 1997
  • Article

    In a Pig's Eye

    Just what is well-known Denver artist Roland Bernier implying when he calls his current show at the Mackey Gallery Casting Pearls? Is the audience--the gallery-going public--the swine? "The title is taken from one of the pieces in the show which...

    by Michael Paglia on November 20, 1997
  • Article

    Supreme Beings

    When A Chorus Line first splashed onto the Broadway stage in 1975, its creator, Michael Bennett, was routinely hailed as a genius, an innovator, and the best and brightest choreographer on the American musical scene. Some even felt that he was heaven...

    by Jim Lillie on November 20, 1997
  • Article

    McHale's Navy

    "But what I really want to do is direct!" reads a T-shirt popular among actors. Even though performers always aspire to creative control, playwrights were actually the theater's first "directors." It was only when productions began to tour (and ...

    by Jim Lillie on November 20, 1997
  • Article

    Back to the Futurist

    The term "Orwellian" is often used to refer to situations in which authority figures like police or even employers poke their noses into people's private concerns, root out potentially incriminating information and then use that knowledge to manipula...

    by Jim Lillie on November 13, 1997
  • Article

    Play It...Again?

    Maybe it's because it touches on hot-button issues that haven't yet vaporized, as so many talk-show topics do. Maybe it's because it's a two-character play that's relatively easy and inexpensive to produce. Or maybe it's because David Mamet--always a...

    by Jim Lillie on November 13, 1997
  • Article

    U.S. Steel

    Each of the artists in the Arvada Center's current show Steel: Nature and Space gets plenty of room to stretch out. And that's a good thing, since Robert Mangold, Andrew Libertone, Russell Beardsley and Carl Reed--four of the most talked-about contem...

    by Michael Paglia on November 6, 1997
  • Article

    Color Commentary

    In 1965 a young African-American actor, Douglas Turner Ward, produced two one-act plays he had written, Happy Ending and Day of Absence. The double bill enjoyed a successful fourteen-month run off-Broadway, and its triumph precipitated Ward's creatio...

    by Jim Lillie on November 6, 1997
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From the Print Edition

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

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I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

Representational imagery shines at Havu

Rather than throw together a group show featuring work by artists whose work is unconnected, for its current exhibit, Articulated Perspectives, the William Havu Gallery focused on four artists who… More >>

Rajiv Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries is a cut above

Jamie Wollrab works in Los Angeles as a director, actor and acting coach, but he grew up in Boulder and loves Colorado. "My family lives here," he says, "and they… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Chris Richter. Back in March, gallery director Bobbi Walker realized that her planned June slot had come apart and that she needed to come up with somebody fast. At the… More >>

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