<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  161  |  ...  |  322  |  ...  |  483  |  ...  |  616  |  617  |  618  |  ...  |  644  |  645  |  Next Page >> 12321 - 12340 of 12893

  • Article

    Celluloid Heroes

    The garish glow emanating from movies, television shows and interactive media has effectively dimmed the theater's jewel in America. But rather than abandoning all hope and selling out to Hollywood, some dramatists are choosing to preserve theatrical...

    by Jim Lillie on March 5, 1998
  • Article

    Frames of Reference

    Two compelling photography exhibits now at the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities include nearly 100 works of art--and almost as many different ideas. The first show starts off with a titillating posted proviso: Children will not be admit...

    by Michael Paglia on February 26, 1998
  • Article

    The Last Seduction

    When Georges Bizet's Carmen premiered in 1875, Parisian audiences were outraged that the opera's title character was a cigarette-smoking, overtly sexual woman who discarded her male lovers like picked flowers. The fact that the story ended with Carme...

    by Jim Lillie on February 26, 1998
  • Article

    Absurdly Good

    Environmental-theater designer Jerry Rojo once remarked that he regarded Samuel Beckett's Endgame as the ultimate personal theatrical experience. Convinced that the play's two main characters personified the conflicting forces of intellect and emotio...

    by Jim Lillie on February 26, 1998
  • Article

    Hammers and Saws

    The building at the corner of 17th and Wazee Streets, where Metropolitan State College's Center for the Visual Arts occupies most of the ground floor, is currently shrouded in a jungle of metal pipes. But the oddly artistic maze isn't part of the cen...

    by Michael Paglia on February 19, 1998
  • Article

    Bargain Basement

    Have you ever regaled a houseful of your friends with an evening's worth of your special brand of witty banter? And did their approving laughter tempt you to take your "material" on stage as a stand-up comic? After all, that's how Tim Allen, Bill Cos...

    by Jim Lillie on February 19, 1998
  • Article

    A Scurvy Lot

    Hoping to recruit the audience members of tomorrow, the Denver Center Theatre Company is increasingly on the lookout for plays that appeal to family audiences. In the latest installment of its Generation Series, the DCTC and director Nagle Jackson ha...

    by Jim Lillie on February 19, 1998
  • Article

    Reality Check

    For many years, getting real was the chief preoccupation of the world's painters. The Stone Age artists who decorated all those caves in France and Spain wanted views for their viewless spaces, and they painted what they knew: mainly bison and horses...

    by Michael Paglia on February 12, 1998
  • Article

    Prairie Fires

    "What can you do with the love that you feel? Where can you take it?" asks an eighteen-year-old girl caught in an emotional tug-of-war in William Inge's Picnic. When her mother replies, "I never found out," the young woman makes a gut-wrenching decis...

    by Jim Lillie on February 12, 1998
  • Article

    The Jazz Singers

    Denver legend has it that the great Billy Eckstine performed in several Five Points jazz clubs of yesteryear, bringing his silky-smooth baritone to such venues as the Rainbow Ballroom and the Rossonian. Piqued by the opportunity to make a local conne...

    by Jim Lillie on February 12, 1998
  • Article

    Season's Greetings

    Already, the art season that began last fall and will end this spring has seen its share of newsworthy events. Some of these developments, especially those in the publicly funded realm, seem all to the good. In November there was the completion, af...

    by Michael Paglia on February 5, 1998
  • Article

    Back to South Africa

    Great playwrights have always attempted to illuminate broad human truths by writing about their own individual demons. Tennessee Williams is the classic American example: His plays consistently give voice to the strange psychoses of the Southern wome...

    by Jim Lillie on February 5, 1998
  • Article

    G-Man Overboard

    When last we heard from famed G-man Eliot Ness, film star Kevin Costner was portraying the crimefighter in Brian DePalma's flamboyant film The Untouchables, itself a knockoff of the 1950s television series starring Robert Stack. But DePalma's tale of...

    by Jim Lillie on February 5, 1998
  • Article

    Up in Lights

    It was with the idea of "breaking the winter doldrums" that Emmanuel Gallery director Carol Keller organized the compelling installation exhibit Ed & Stan at Emmanuel. Consider those doldrums broken. The "Ed" of the show's title is sculptor ...

    by Michael Paglia on January 29, 1998
  • Article

    What a Pair

    For the last thirty years, comedy writer Neil Simon has reigned as the king of America's community-theater circuit, where his plays are a favorite choice of groups strapped for cash, talent and time. Amateur performers need only speak the Pulitzer Pr...

    by Jim Lillie on January 29, 1998
  • Article

    God's Country

    Just when it appeared that the reputation of noted Christian apologist and children's book author (The Chronicles of Narnia) C.S. Lewis might naturally diminish with the passing of time, British playwright William Nicholson rescued the prolific write...

    by Jim Lillie on January 29, 1998
  • Article

    From Pillar to Post

    Downtown Denver has been home to nearly all of the largest, most expensive and most important buildings constructed in the Rocky Mountain region over the past 100 years. It's a history book written in stone. But there are some missing chapters. ...

    by Michael Paglia on January 22, 1998
  • Article

    The New Christie Minstrels

    As murder mysteries go, the Country Dinner Playhouse staging of Agatha Christie's The Hollow has much to recommend it. Bill McHale's well-directed show features a stellar cast of veteran actors. What's more, superb costumes from Nicole Hoof and a tas...

    by Jim Lillie on January 22, 1998
  • Article

    Soul on Ice

    Ask a professor of ancient history for an explanation of the architectural history of theaters, and he might tell you the large, circular dancing space that is the centerpiece of all Greek theaters took its inspiration from the threshing circles that...

    by Jim Lillie on January 22, 1998
  • Article

    Of Mice and Men

    New York-based artist and author Art Spiegelman is among the most important contemporary cartoonists in the world. And his considerable fame is based almost wholly on Maus, a sometimes hard-bound comic book first published in 1986 by Pantheon Books. ...

    by Michael Paglia on January 15, 1998
<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  161  |  ...  |  322  |  ...  |  483  |  ...  |  616  |  617  |  618  |  ...  |  644  |  645  |  Next Page >> 12321 - 12340 of 12893
Denver Concert Tickets

Find an Arts Event

From the Print Edition

Conceptual art takes over Gildar Gallery

For his latest show, Takeover, Gildar Gallery owner Adam Gildar enlisted the help of Charlie James, a Los Angeles-based art dealer, who curated the show. The two have a similar… More >>

The Odd Couple is a good match for Miners Alley

There's not a lot of nourishment in Neil Simon's The Odd Couple, which premiered on Broadway in 1965, spawned a film and television show, and is now showing at Miners… More >>

Now Showing

Outside in 303.This summer feature at the Museo de las Amesricas is absolutely spectacular, with each of the included artists being given lots of space to stretch out. Conceived and… More >>

Now Playing

Henry IV, Part 1. King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily… More >>

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

Loading...