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  • Article

    Therapy Sessions

    Ever since one of the king's men stepped forward amid a sea of Elizabethan spectators and intoned Hamlet's famous "To be or not to be" soliloquy, playwrights have continually asked audience members to join them as silent partners in the commission of...

    by Jim Lillie on September 10, 1998
  • Article

    Artistic Democracy

    Denver's collection of art cooperatives--notably, Spark, Pirate, Edge, Core and ILK--are a boon to contemporary art here. Most major cities don't have anything close. The co-ops' great cultural value is that they provide opportunities for emerging ar...

    by Michael Paglia on September 3, 1998
  • Article

    Baby Blues

    In the opening moments of Emma's Child, a self-described "local nothing" of a teenage mother permits her unborn baby to be adopted at birth by a well-meaning, well-to-do childless couple. This might lead audiences to believe that playwright Kristine ...

    by Jim Lillie on September 3, 1998
  • Article

    Grapes of Rag

    Ten years ago, when the only marquee Ragtime graced was the imaginary one glimmering in the eyes of its creators, the musical's current director, Frank Galati, was earning a well-deserved reputation as one of this country's most innovative, if enigma...

    by Jim Lillie on September 3, 1998
  • Article

    Winds of Summer

    The art scene in Denver does not shut down during the summer as it does in the big cities on the east and west coasts. Even here, though, there is a point when everyone seems to be taking a break--and that hiatus is currently on. The last of the summ...

    by Michael Paglia on August 27, 1998
  • Article

    Come to Mama

    Celebrated warbler Sophie Tucker was the most famous of the Prohibition-era "naughty girls" who belted out honky-tonk melodies, jazz tunes and torch songs in vaudeville acts that also sometimes included trained animals, female impersonators and famou...

    by Jim Lillie on August 27, 1998
  • Article

    The Melting Pot

    Is it possible to save another human being from himself? Are the exhortations of politicians, sociologists and religious types the best answers to the problems plaguing the three downtrodden New Yorkers in William Hanley's play Slow Dance on the Kill...

    by Jim Lillie on August 27, 1998
  • Article

    Guilt by Association

    Despite recent events in Jasper, Texas, it's difficult to imagine a group of modern white men brazen enough to pose for a snapshot as they gather around a black man's mangled and lynched body swaying from a tree amid the tranquility of a Southern for...

    by Jim Lillie on August 20, 1998
  • Article

    Miller's Crossing

    A couple of years ago, playwright Arthur Miller sounded something of a death knell for commercial theater when he remarked, "The theater culture on Broadway is dead. You can't expect people to pay forty, fifty, sixty, a hundred dollars to sit down fo...

    by Jim Lillie on August 20, 1998
  • Article

    Inside, Outside

    In visual art, representations of the outside world have a formidable history--some 14,000 years' worth. Which, of course, creates a problem for contemporary artists: How can they record external reality and still do something new? To meet this chall...

    by Michael Paglia on August 13, 1998
  • Article

    Clothes Call

    People in the art world--artists, dealers and collectors alike--generally eschew dressing up. As renowned writer and art collector Gertrude Stein observed in the 1930s, if you don't have much money, you either buy clothes, or you buy art. Stein kept ...

    by Michael Paglia on August 6, 1998
  • Article

    Liquid Assets

    Back in the late Eighties, when a team of New York producers announced that a stage version of the classic 1952 film Singin' in the Rain was in the works, two questions crossed the minds of every prospective audience member: "How do you pull off the ...

    by Jim Lillie on August 6, 1998
  • Article

    Love Him Tender

    As strains of "Can't Help Falling in Love" waft through the smoke-tinged air of the Mercury Cafe, a young woman haltingly enters the local establishment's Jungle Room and takes up residence in one of its remote corners. Her oddly vacant eyes darting ...

    by Jim Lillie on August 6, 1998
  • Article

    Middle-Age Modern

    Oh, the America of the 1950s. In the nostalgic mind's eye, the era is all poodle-skirts and roller skates, malt shops furnished with chrome dinettes and jukeboxes filled with Elvis. It was a time when, according to the late career civil servant W. Av...

    by Michael Paglia on July 30, 1998
  • Article

    Bard Games

    Scholars and theatergoers will always argue about the legitimacy of setting William Shakespeare's plays in periods other than Elizabethan England. Employing the well-worn device sometimes yields rich rewards, as evidenced two summers back by the Colo...

    by Jim Lillie on July 30, 1998
  • Article

    Star of Stripes

    Sean Scully occupies a peculiar niche in the history of recent art. An unabashed modernist, he came of artistic age in the 1980s, an era dominated by an anti-modernist zeitgeist. The assault on modernism generally, and on abstract painting in particu...

    by Michael Paglia on July 23, 1998
  • Article

    Going Solo

    It's difficult to imagine anyone other than Christopher Plummer playing the title character in William Luce's Barrymore. In addition to maintaining his performer's lock on the role since the play premiered at Canada's prestigious Stratford Festival i...

    by Jim Lillie on July 23, 1998
  • Article

    Bewitched

    What happens when a man is forced to choose between the well-being of his children and the sanctity of his good name? Should John Proctor, the main character in Robert Ward's opera The Crucible, preserve his sons' inheritance by bending to the stiff-...

    by Jim Lillie on July 23, 1998
  • Article

    Do's and Don't's

    You may want to wash your hands after taking in the trio of oddball (a polite but accurate term) conceptual exhibits that fill the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art this summer. While none are visually edifying, all three challenge conventional, and...

    by Michael Paglia on July 16, 1998
  • Article

    Local Vocals

    By virtually every account, the 18-to-34 age group is the fastest-growing segment of the opera-going public. Although no one can explain exactly why Baywatching channel-surfers from the MTV generation are hooked on an art form once renowned for its c...

    by Jim Lillie on July 16, 1998
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From the Print Edition

Five Reasons Why It Would Be Stupid to Demolish Boettcher Concert Hall

Michael Paglia isn't a big fan of the City & County of Denver when it comes to architectural and artistic decisions. After all, he writes, officials there have fumbled everything… More >>

Jamie Ann Romero Exits Denver for the Bright Lights of New York City

Every now and then, you realize you're watching a genuine star. Not just a very good, emotionally generous actor who makes intellectually interesting choices, but someone possessed of a quality… More >>

Now Showing

Angela Beloian and Roger Hubbard. For In Technicolor, her new exhibit at Walker Fine Art, Boulder artist Angela Beloian created a body of retro '60s and '70s paintings and screen… More >>

Now Playing

On Golden Pond. As this play opens, Norman and Ethel Thayer are moving back into their summer house in Maine. Every summer for 48 years, he's come here to fish… More >>

Mack & Mabel: The Script Bores, but the Music Soars

Mack & Mabel purports to tell the story of the confused and conflicted love between Mack Sennett, impresario of the early comic silent movies, and Mabel Normand, the young woman… More >>

The DAM's Tom Wesselmann Show Is a Lesson in Art History

Michael Paglia has been writing about the art scene in Denver and Front Range for twenty years, following the latest shows, trends and news at museums and galleries. Read his… More >>

Now Showing

Angela Beloian and Roger Hubbard. For In Technicolor, her new exhibit at Walker Fine Art, Boulder artist Angela Beloian created a body of retro '60s and '70s paintings and screen… More >>

Now Playing

On Golden Pond. As this play opens, Norman and Ethel Thayer are moving back into their summer house in Maine. Every summer for 48 years, he's come here to fish… More >>

Ignite Theatre's Rent Has Room to Grow

The audience for Ignite Theatre's Rent is large, boisterous, young, and deeply involved with the action. Throughout the evening, you hear hoots of appreciative laughter, empathetic breath intakes and murmurs,… More >>

Four Artists Explore the World of Codes at Sandra Phillips

Michael Paglia has been writing about the art scene in Denver and Front Range for twenty years, following the latest shows, trends and news at museums and galleries. See his… More >>

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