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  • Article

    Irish Eyes

    No single event stamps its imprint more indelibly on the body politic than the taking of a hostage. In fact, hostage situations involving American soldiers, journalists and businessmen have each proved the point that nothing--not internal racial disc...

    by Jim Lillie on April 2, 1998
  • Article

    A Thousand Words

    The Nazis had a perversely high regard for the arts. As early as 1933, Adolf Hitler's goons began a campaign against modern art, closing art schools, expelling modernist art teachers from German universities, and arresting and incarcerating scores of...

    by Michael Paglia on March 26, 1998
  • Article

    Return to Gender

    Playwright August Wilson was at Dartmouth College the other day, spouting off once again about why America needs a separate theater dedicated to the interests of African-Americans. White artists, Wilson has repeatedly argued, are simply ill-equipped ...

    by Jim Lillie on March 26, 1998
  • Article

    The New Yorkers

    The Round World gallery opened quietly last fall on the edge of downtown Denver, moving into a pair of rehabbed storefronts that share a red-brick Victorian building with the popular La Coupole French restaurant. It's an obscure location for an art g...

    by Michael Paglia on March 19, 1998
  • Article

    French Tickler

    President Clinton's 1993 appointment of actress Jane Alexander to head the National Endowment for the Arts was seen by many as a healthy sign for the embattled agency. After all, Alexander had enjoyed a distinguished career in the theater and was the...

    by Jim Lillie on March 19, 1998
  • Article

    That Girl

    Apart from angst-ridden playwrights, hostile audiences and long periods of unemployment, the greatest challenge faced by a professional actor is the tricky business of sharing the stage with children and small animals. W.C. Fields made hating kids do...

    by Jim Lillie on March 19, 1998
  • Article

    Vance Encounter

    Vance Kirkland was the biggest name in Denver's art world for much of the twentieth century. From the 1930s through the 1970s, he dominated the local art scene, not just as the city's premier modern painter, but also as an influential art teacher and...

    by Michael Paglia on March 12, 1998
  • Article

    Bard Copy

    William Shakespeare was, above all else, a practical man. The sheer majesty of his verse notwithstanding, the Bard of Avon became the world's greatest playwright because he told his versions of borrowed (some would say stolen) stories better than any...

    by Jim Lillie on March 12, 1998
  • Article

    Post Mortem

    It used to be that real estate developers actually had to have plans to build something new before the Denver City Council would let them demolish a historic building. But at the council meeting February 23, Denver developer Bruce Berger didn't have ...

    by Michael Paglia on March 5, 1998
  • Article

    Folk Zinger

    If you've always thought it takes an advanced college degree to understand and appreciate a play, El Centro Su Teatro's charming production of When El Cucui Walks is precisely the play to convince you otherwise. Even though this two-hour-plus drama d...

    by Jim Lillie on March 5, 1998
  • Article

    Celluloid Heroes

    The garish glow emanating from movies, television shows and interactive media has effectively dimmed the theater's jewel in America. But rather than abandoning all hope and selling out to Hollywood, some dramatists are choosing to preserve theatrical...

    by Jim Lillie on March 5, 1998
  • Article

    Frames of Reference

    Two compelling photography exhibits now at the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities include nearly 100 works of art--and almost as many different ideas. The first show starts off with a titillating posted proviso: Children will not be admit...

    by Michael Paglia on February 26, 1998
  • Article

    The Last Seduction

    When Georges Bizet's Carmen premiered in 1875, Parisian audiences were outraged that the opera's title character was a cigarette-smoking, overtly sexual woman who discarded her male lovers like picked flowers. The fact that the story ended with Carme...

    by Jim Lillie on February 26, 1998
  • Article

    Absurdly Good

    Environmental-theater designer Jerry Rojo once remarked that he regarded Samuel Beckett's Endgame as the ultimate personal theatrical experience. Convinced that the play's two main characters personified the conflicting forces of intellect and emotio...

    by Jim Lillie on February 26, 1998
  • Article

    Hammers and Saws

    The building at the corner of 17th and Wazee Streets, where Metropolitan State College's Center for the Visual Arts occupies most of the ground floor, is currently shrouded in a jungle of metal pipes. But the oddly artistic maze isn't part of the cen...

    by Michael Paglia on February 19, 1998
  • Article

    Bargain Basement

    Have you ever regaled a houseful of your friends with an evening's worth of your special brand of witty banter? And did their approving laughter tempt you to take your "material" on stage as a stand-up comic? After all, that's how Tim Allen, Bill Cos...

    by Jim Lillie on February 19, 1998
  • Article

    A Scurvy Lot

    Hoping to recruit the audience members of tomorrow, the Denver Center Theatre Company is increasingly on the lookout for plays that appeal to family audiences. In the latest installment of its Generation Series, the DCTC and director Nagle Jackson ha...

    by Jim Lillie on February 19, 1998
  • Article

    Prairie Fires

    "What can you do with the love that you feel? Where can you take it?" asks an eighteen-year-old girl caught in an emotional tug-of-war in William Inge's Picnic. When her mother replies, "I never found out," the young woman makes a gut-wrenching decis...

    by Jim Lillie on February 12, 1998
  • Article

    Reality Check

    For many years, getting real was the chief preoccupation of the world's painters. The Stone Age artists who decorated all those caves in France and Spain wanted views for their viewless spaces, and they painted what they knew: mainly bison and horses...

    by Michael Paglia on February 12, 1998
  • Article

    The Jazz Singers

    Denver legend has it that the great Billy Eckstine performed in several Five Points jazz clubs of yesteryear, bringing his silky-smooth baritone to such venues as the Rainbow Ballroom and the Rossonian. Piqued by the opportunity to make a local conne...

    by Jim Lillie on February 12, 1998
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From the Print Edition

Mack & Mabel: The Script Bores, but the Music Soars

Mack & Mabel purports to tell the story of the confused and conflicted love between Mack Sennett, impresario of the early comic silent movies, and Mabel Normand, the young woman… More >>

The DAM's Tom Wesselmann Show Is a Lesson in Art History

Michael Paglia has been writing about the art scene in Denver and Front Range for twenty years, following the latest shows, trends and news at museums and galleries. Read his… More >>

Now Showing

Angela Beloian and Roger Hubbard. For In Technicolor, her new exhibit at Walker Fine Art, Boulder artist Angela Beloian created a body of retro '60s and '70s paintings and screen… More >>

Now Playing

On Golden Pond. As this play opens, Norman and Ethel Thayer are moving back into their summer house in Maine. Every summer for 48 years, he's come here to fish… More >>

Ignite Theatre's Rent Has Room to Grow

The audience for Ignite Theatre's Rent is large, boisterous, young, and deeply involved with the action. Throughout the evening, you hear hoots of appreciative laughter, empathetic breath intakes and murmurs,… More >>

Four Artists Explore the World of Codes at Sandra Phillips

Michael Paglia has been writing about the art scene in Denver and Front Range for twenty years, following the latest shows, trends and news at museums and galleries. See his… More >>

Now Showing

Angela Beloian and Roger Hubbard.For In Technicolor, her new exhibit at Walker Fine Art, Boulder artist Angela Beloian created a body of retro '60s and '70s paintings and screen prints… More >>

Now Playing

The Odd Couple. There's not a lot of nourishment in Neil Simon's The Odd Couple, which has been around since the mid-1960s, but the central pairing of two very different… More >>

Wonderful Voices Aren't Enough to Elevate Central City Opera's The Sound of Music

Though I generally love Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals, The Sound of Music has never been one of my favorites. But continuing a tradition it started two years ago of bringing… More >>

Installations Fill the Lower Galleries at the Arvada Center

Last month, Michael Paglia reviewed Unbound: Sculpture in the Field, an over-the-top outdoor exhibit for which the prairie land south of the Arvada Center has been turned into an informal… More >>

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