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  • Article

    BROADWAY LIMITED

    The third play of Neil Simon's autobiographical trilogy, Broadway Bound, is only ankle deep. But the wading is both more pleasant and more interesting than in the first two plays in the series, Brighton Beach Memoirs and Biloxi Blues. This last play ...

    on October 4, 1995
  • Article

    SMELL OF THE HOUSEPAINT

    In a Pentecostal church near 11th Avenue and Acoma Street in downtown Denver, a corps of volunteer carpenters is busy building the only Elizabethan-style stage in Denver--and a one-of-a-kind theater arts facility. The church, where a small congre...

    on October 4, 1995
  • Article

    GOING, GOING--GONE

    Lately, and increasingly, museums across the country and around the world have begun "deaccessioning"--selling off parts of their existing collections as a ready source of "free money" to pay for new acquisitions. It's money, more than art, that's ha...

    by Michael Paglia on September 27, 1995
  • Article

    KEEPING HIS COMPOSER

    The Aurora Fox Theatre's striking production of Peter Shaffer's Amadeus proves once again that one can abhor the sentiments of a playwright and still find depth, meaning and mastery in his work. But it takes an ingenious performance or two, luminous ...

    on September 27, 1995
  • Article

    STIFF UPPER BRITS

    Reviving the quintessential Fifties drama is no easy matter; so many of the values and beliefs of the period seem dated. The best approach is to be as true to the period as possible. Director Jeremy Cole takes Terence Rattigan's charming Separate Tab...

    on September 27, 1995
  • Article

    PHOTOGRAPHY TODAY

    Words, just like art objects, are subject to fashion. Suddenly everyone is using the word "venerable" or mouthing a phrase like "narrative content." Everywhere I go these days, artists, especially those associated with the alternative scene, are talk...

    by Michael Paglia on September 20, 1995
  • Article

    GETTING EVEN

    One can respect a play and hate it at the same time. Drawn in to the premise completely, you can ultimately feel manipulated, and finally angry. Ariel Dorfman's Death and the Maiden is just such a play--capable of awakening the darkest revenge fantas...

    on September 20, 1995
  • Article

    THE PARENT RAP

    Parents are difficult in every culture. If they're kind, loving people who only want the best for their adult children, they can be pretty darn willful about just what that "best" might be. So grown-up offspring have to find ingenious ways of asserti...

    on September 20, 1995
  • Article

    GLASS ACT

    People often talk about art when they're actually referring to something else. We hear about the art of the deal, the art of medicine. There's the art of cooking. And the art of politics. Even the art of baseball. Aren't comedians and rock stars call...

    by Michael Paglia on September 13, 1995
  • Article

    STILL A KILLER

    It's impossible to beat Alfred Hitchcock at his own game. Nobody could remake Dial "M" for Murder as a movie and make it work. But Frederick Knott's 1950s crime play still crackles oddly on the stage. And Hunger Artists' stylish production, though in...

    on September 13, 1995
  • Article

    TRUE VOICES

    Once in a while a glimpse of something special comes through in a theatrical event. And Voices of the Children: The World of Brundibar is special. This is community theater as it should be: beautifully mounted, intelligent, moving and a little raw ar...

    on September 13, 1995
  • Article

    PIGMENTS OF THE IMAGINATION

    To many in the art world, painting is the center stage, the place where the aesthetic stakes are the highest. The Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art's thought-provoking exhibition Pure Painting provides snapshot views of current events in the venerab...

    by Michael Paglia on September 6, 1995
  • Article

    BEACH CRAFT

    When you think of Edward Albee, the word "hopeful" does not readily leap to mind. The author of The Zoo Story, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and All Over, among many other dark dramas, lashes out at human cruelty, egotism and the inability to commu...

    on September 6, 1995
  • Article

    TAPPY DAYS

    The great movie and Broadway musicals of the 1930s seem both naive and extravagant in hindsight. Depression-era folk wanted to lose sight of their dreary poverty in visions of glittery gowns and lighthearted romances. The humor in these shows was usu...

    on September 6, 1995
  • Article

    PEEP SHOW

    The depiction of the nude figure in the fine arts isn't just ancient--it's genuinely age-old. In the Paleolithic cave paintings of France and Spain, usually seen as the oldest works of art on Earth, those famous bison and deer are being pursued by nu...

    by Michael Paglia on August 30, 1995
  • Article

    BEYOND BELIEF

    Sometimes you have to be beastly to be kind. And as beastly as Geniuses, Madmen, and Saints can be, all British playwright Peter Barnes's rage and wit is directed at what is most vicious and self-deceptive in human beings--particularly those who use ...

    on August 30, 1995
  • Article

    BIG TWANG THEORY

    You have to love country music--particularly country music from the early 1960s--to really get the most out of Always...Patsy Cline. It also helps if you like being part of the show, since the actors talk and sing directly to you and even draw indivi...

    on August 30, 1995
  • Article

    SPELL-BOUND

    A principal benefit of following the Denver art scene is the wealth of local artists who pursue their work oblivious to the shifting sands of contemporary trends. Sometimes, though, a solitary approach can lead an artist right into the middle of thos...

    by Michael Paglia on August 23, 1995
  • Article

    GOING UP

    For nearly twenty years, the Rocky Mountain Women's Institute has chosen a handful of writers, dancers, visual artists and others to receive "associateships"--essentially $1,000 stipends. Since the institute's founding in 1976, more than 100 individu...

    by Michael Paglia on August 23, 1995
  • Article

    CLASH DISMISSED

    Playwright David Mamet understands how people really converse. He articulates the rhythms of the inarticulate, because he grasps how hard it is sometimes to talk and think at once, even to finish sentences. The mind and the emotions race so far ahead...

    on August 23, 1995
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From the Print Edition

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

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Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

Representational imagery shines at Havu

Rather than throw together a group show featuring work by artists whose work is unconnected, for its current exhibit, Articulated Perspectives, the William Havu Gallery focused on four artists who… More >>

Rajiv Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries is a cut above

Jamie Wollrab works in Los Angeles as a director, actor and acting coach, but he grew up in Boulder and loves Colorado. "My family lives here," he says, "and they… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Chris Richter. Back in March, gallery director Bobbi Walker realized that her planned June slot had come apart and that she needed to come up with somebody fast. At the… More >>

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