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  • Article

    Common Sense

    Many collectors are interested in buying so-called museum-quality artwork. For a gallery owner, the trick is to convince potential clients that what they're looking at could just as easily hang in a museum as in their own home. But Bill Havu, owner o...

    by Michael Paglia on January 21, 1999
  • Article

    Still Very Much Alive

    As an undergraduate at University College in Dublin, James Joyce once published an 8,000-word article on Henrik Ibsen's final play, When We Dead Awaken, that prompted the father of modern drama to dash off a sincere letter of thanks to his ardent adm...

    by Jim Lillie on January 21, 1999
  • Article

    Love's Labors Lost

    A.R. Gurney is famous for writing middlebrow off-Broadway plays in which well-to-do WASPs comically mourn the passing of their cherished way of life. Past Gurney bromides examined such hallowed American myths as the old-boy network (The Old Boy, pres...

    by Jim Lillie on January 21, 1999
  • Article

    Marley's Ghost

    In the media hoopla surrounding the Denver Center Theatre Company's 1998 Tony Award for outstanding regional theater, most theatergoers didn't notice that the award was given for a body of work that wasn't even produced last season. More to the point...

    by Jim Lillie on December 31, 1998
  • Article

    Green Eggs and Hams

    Theodor Seuss Geisel won a pair of Academy awards for writing Design for Death, a 1947 film documentary about Japanese warlords, and Gerald McBoing Boing, a 1950 animated cartoon. But he was better known as Dr. Seuss, the prolific author who launched...

    by Jim Lillie on December 24, 1998
  • Article

    Dancing on Her Grave

    Human beings have reveled in the mocking of solemnity as early as the twelfth century, when subversive subdeacons rang church bells improperly as part of the annual Feast of Fools and food-fighting choir boys mischievously sang out of tune during the...

    by Jim Lillie on December 24, 1998
  • Article

    Focus Group

    Perhaps because of its majestic scenery, or maybe because the skies are not cloudy all day, Colorado has become, in the twentieth century, an important regional center for fine-art photography. What's most remarkable about this wonderful state of aff...

    by Michael Paglia on December 17, 1998
  • Article

    Paid in Full

    Acutely aware that society routinely champions mendacity in matters of art, beauty and truth, the Lower East Side slackers in the musical Rent harbor no illusions about their place in the world. They'll never be invited to place their names in the so...

    by Jim Lillie on December 17, 1998
  • Article

    To All a Good Night

    Its yearly appearance might be anticipated, dreaded or even lampooned, but Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol remains the quintessential holiday story about the transformative powers of love, forgiveness and redemption. Director Laird Williamson has...

    by Jim Lillie on December 17, 1998
  • Article

    New and Improved

    A couple of weeks ago, a group exhibit called Views of Solitude opened and thus served as the premier display of the brand-new William Havu Gallery. The show and, even more so, the gallery itself, elicited audible gasps from many of the more than 500...

    by Michael Paglia on December 10, 1998
  • Article

    Rock of New Ages

    Are the crystal-arranging rituals of gong-happy new-agers really any different from the solemn-voiced genuflecting that undergirds the world's established blood religions? Does our willingness to profess unwavering belief--whether in the rock of ages...

    by Jim Lillie on December 10, 1998
  • Article

    Dead Man Laughing

    On the surface, Beth Henley's The Wake of Jamey Foster looks like a typical American dysfunctional-family play. In fact, before Act One is twenty minutes old, we've become acquainted with an undiscovered ectomorphic genius who makes a living cashing ...

    by Jim Lillie on December 10, 1998
  • Article

    Panoramic Views

    For its holiday offering, LoDo's Robischon Gallery has teamed up a pair of disparate shows that together give viewers some sense of the pluralism reigning at the end of this century. In the series of rooms that make up the gallery's main space, ...

    by Michael Paglia on December 3, 1998
  • Article

    All Tapped Out

    Near the end of Riverdance--The Show, there's a brief yet moving scene that beautifully clarifies and unifies all thirteen of the Irish dance extravaganza's far-flung episodes. To the bow-shredding accompaniment of a lone violinist, the fervent compa...

    by Jim Lillie on December 3, 1998
  • Article

    Clueless in America

    Setting his huckster's sights on no less a prize than the United States presidency, a slick-talking loudmouth unabashedly declares, "Truth is in the eye of the beholder or the mouth of the seller." Before his TV-reporter girlfriend can convince him o...

    by Jim Lillie on December 3, 1998
  • Article

    All Aboard

    In the expansive Hamilton Galleries on the first floor of the Denver Art Museum is a glorious show, Inventing the Southwest: The Fred Harvey Company and Native American Art, which highlights a dazzling array of American Indian art. The Fred Harvey Co...

    by Michael Paglia on November 26, 1998
  • Article

    What We're Made Of

    What, exactly, constitutes our national character? Are we largely the sum of our popularly determined and time-tested beliefs? Or is our collective psyche a more mercurial interfusion of passionate and ephemeral desires? Before you get all centrist-m...

    by Jim Lillie on November 26, 1998
  • Article

    Piss and Vinegar

    Ron Judish Fine Arts, which opened just this past spring, has already distinguished itself as one of the city's finest commercial galleries. But the current Judish show, Andres Serrano: A Survey, which sketches out the career of one of the nation's m...

    by Michael Paglia on November 19, 1998
  • Article

    Demons at Work

    Soon after Tennessee Williams finished writing his last great play, The Night of the Iguana, in 1961, America's preeminent dramatic poet plunged into a severe decline marked by acute drug and alcohol dependency, extended periods of mental illness for...

    by Jim Lillie on November 19, 1998
  • Article

    Jogging for Life

    For a touchy-feely play written at the beginning of America's politically correct modern age, Michael Brady's To Gillian on Her 37th Birthday is surprisingly humorous, delightfully risque and impishly entertaining. The romantic drama about a strong-w...

    by Jim Lillie on November 19, 1998
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