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  • Article

    A Good Joe

    Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat is an ideal microcosm of the contemporary Broadway musical. It's based on a story written by someone else (the complete text may be found in the Book of Genesis, Chapters 37 through 50); it borrows from se...

    by Jim Lillie on December 4, 1997
  • Article

    Wedding Bell Blahs

    Thirty years ago, Richard Schechner created the Performance Group in New York, an avant-garde company whose shows were riveting because of their carefully rehearsed spontaneity. What was important in Schechner's productions was the unpredictable seri...

    by Jim Lillie on December 4, 1997
  • Article

    High Hopes

    Just in time for the holidays, the Denver Art Museum has raised the curtain on its seven-year, $7.5 million facelift. Judging by the crowds--more than 13,000 visitors showed up on the first weekend alone--many people have found it worth the wait. But...

    by Michael Paglia on November 27, 1997
  • Article

    Lone Rangers

    Give Barbara Walters credit. Or maybe it's Sigmund Freud who deserves the accolades. While we're at it, let's not forget the hordes of celebrities now clamoring to publish their memoirs or autobiographies. All of them must be taken into consideration...

    by Jim Lillie on November 27, 1997
  • Article

    In a Pig's Eye

    Just what is well-known Denver artist Roland Bernier implying when he calls his current show at the Mackey Gallery Casting Pearls? Is the audience--the gallery-going public--the swine? "The title is taken from one of the pieces in the show which...

    by Michael Paglia on November 20, 1997
  • Article

    Supreme Beings

    When A Chorus Line first splashed onto the Broadway stage in 1975, its creator, Michael Bennett, was routinely hailed as a genius, an innovator, and the best and brightest choreographer on the American musical scene. Some even felt that he was heaven...

    by Jim Lillie on November 20, 1997
  • Article

    McHale's Navy

    "But what I really want to do is direct!" reads a T-shirt popular among actors. Even though performers always aspire to creative control, playwrights were actually the theater's first "directors." It was only when productions began to tour (and ...

    by Jim Lillie on November 20, 1997
  • Article

    Back to the Futurist

    The term "Orwellian" is often used to refer to situations in which authority figures like police or even employers poke their noses into people's private concerns, root out potentially incriminating information and then use that knowledge to manipula...

    by Jim Lillie on November 13, 1997
  • Article

    Play It...Again?

    Maybe it's because it touches on hot-button issues that haven't yet vaporized, as so many talk-show topics do. Maybe it's because it's a two-character play that's relatively easy and inexpensive to produce. Or maybe it's because David Mamet--always a...

    by Jim Lillie on November 13, 1997
  • Article

    U.S. Steel

    Each of the artists in the Arvada Center's current show Steel: Nature and Space gets plenty of room to stretch out. And that's a good thing, since Robert Mangold, Andrew Libertone, Russell Beardsley and Carl Reed--four of the most talked-about contem...

    by Michael Paglia on November 6, 1997
  • Article

    Color Commentary

    In 1965 a young African-American actor, Douglas Turner Ward, produced two one-act plays he had written, Happy Ending and Day of Absence. The double bill enjoyed a successful fourteen-month run off-Broadway, and its triumph precipitated Ward's creatio...

    by Jim Lillie on November 6, 1997
  • Article

    Honor Students

    Outstanding theater programs have a way of thriving in the face of adversity. Nowhere is that more true than in academia, where the general rule for arts programs is that you either have state-of-the-art facilities populated by meager talent or talen...

    by Jim Lillie on November 6, 1997
  • Article

    The Great Escape

    It's no exaggeration to say that American culture got its greatest boost ever from the rise of the Nazis in Europe in the 1930s and '40s. Hitler's hatred for modernism in the arts led many of the most important contemporary figures to flee the contin...

    by Michael Paglia on October 30, 1997
  • Article

    High Flyer

    The always opinionated George Bernard Shaw once challenged the so-called Father of Modern Drama, Henrik Ibsen, to explain "if he can, why the building of houses and the raising of families is not the ultimate destiny of mankind." All this despite the...

    by Jim Lillie on October 30, 1997
  • Article

    Class Clowns

    How did you respond in school when you were told by the teacher that the day's learning was going to be "fun"? Did you imagine that you'd be entertained by Spandex-clad song-and-dance specialists? Were sing-alongs what you envisioned when a math less...

    by Jim Lillie on October 30, 1997
  • Article

    And They're Off

    The spectacular show The Collectors Vision marks the first exhibit presented under the auspices of Denver's new Museum of Contemporary Art. And though it's been a very long time coming, this show on the mezzanine of the 1999 Broadway Building has pro...

    by Michael Paglia on October 23, 1997
  • Article

    Do Not Adjust Your Seat

    Veteran Madison Avenue ad exec Marshall Karp moved to Los Angeles in 1987 and garnered modest success writing for such TV shows as Amen, starring Sherman "George Jefferson" Hemsley, and Baby Talk, featuring Connie Sellecca and George Clooney. Four ye...

    by Jim Lillie on October 23, 1997
  • Article

    Short Circuits

    The one-act play is largely a twentieth-century phenomenon. Shakespeare evidently never wrote a one-act play to encapsulate his feelings and thoughts, even though his world may have seemed smaller to him than our modern, global network of communicati...

    by Jim Lillie on October 23, 1997
  • Article

    Abstracts in Autumn

    Those cold fronts that have recently swept down from Wyoming can mean only one thing--the start of the fall art season. And the forecast for this year's exhibition climate? Batten down the hatches. Exciting shows are cropping up everywhere, even at t...

    by Michael Paglia on October 16, 1997
  • Article

    Running Away With the Cirque

    What did it all mean? That was the lingering question many audience members pondered one recent Saturday afternoon after Cirque du Soleil loosened its formidable grip on their collective imaginations. Holding the sell-out crowd spellbound with a ...

    by Jim Lillie on October 16, 1997
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