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  • Article

    THE ZECKENDORF FOLLIES

    It's hard for those who love art to understand why some would seek it out only to destroy it. What is the motive of the vandal who slashes a painting or defaces a sculpture? Is he deranged? It's different with architecture. No one would consider ...

    by Michael Paglia on May 17, 1995
  • Article

    CAPTIVE AUDIENCE

    What books would you bring to a desert island if, heaven forbid, you were condemned to one? What single luxury would you bring to ease the loneliness and discomfort of such an imprisonment? These are the questions asked by three captives in Someone W...

    on May 17, 1995
  • Article

    SIX APPEAL

    A lot of cultural pretensions are examined in David Ives's hilarious collection of six playlets, All in the Timing--mostly in bursts of brilliant and sometimes surreal parody. Though none too deep, this offbeat offering is still right on, and the Ger...

    on May 17, 1995
  • Article

    FOLLOW THE BOUNCING BALL

    Our society has never afforded organized athletics the social status granted to those things ordinarily called culture: music, dance, theater, literature or the visual arts. But that distinction was unknown in the pre-Columbian cultures of Mesoameric...

    by Michael Paglia on May 10, 1995
  • Article

    FAMILY AFIRE

    Just when you think it's safe to go to the theater, Christopher Durang shows up somewhere and disturbs all your complacencies. Brilliant, amusing, incisive and ultimately humane, Durang's caustic assessments of American life and Catholic upbringing m...

    on May 10, 1995
  • Article

    COSMOS TOPPER

    According to the first version of the war in heaven, Michael and his angels fought, and Satan fell like lightning from the sky. God won. Not so in Jose Rivera's apocalyptic Marisol, in which God loses, in part because he's already allowed all hell to...

    on May 10, 1995
  • Article

    DON'T SAY "CHEESE"

    The power of still photography to inspire deep emotional response was well-demonstrated two weeks ago in Oklahoma City. Adrift in a sea of video, it was the perfectly framed image of a heroic firefighter cradling the body of a dying child that hit th...

    by Michael Paglia on May 3, 1995
  • Article

    GHOST BUSTERS

    At the end of Hamlet, the stage is littered with bodies. Lee Blessing's Fortinbras picks up where Shakespeare left off, putting a hilarious new spin on where those bodies are buried. The wit is wry and the characters involving in this lively producti...

    on May 3, 1995
  • Article

    GAY WATCH

    Mart Crowley's The Boys in the Band, a breakthrough drama first performed in 1968, is dated in some ways but still packs a punchy--and universal--message. The play has very definite problems, but a strong production now at the Theatre on Broadway und...

    on May 3, 1995
  • Article

    HEAD TRIP

    The much-talked-about head of the University of Denver's sculpture department, Lawrence Argent, is paired with Arizona-based ceramic artist Dorothy Rissman in the current exhibit The Figure Re-examined at the Mackey Gallery. What we have here are ess...

    by Michael Paglia on April 26, 1995
  • Article

    DRESSING FOR DINNER

    Denver artist Linde Schlumbohm can't stop thinking about food--she's virtually obsessed with the topic. In What's Eating Eve?, her fourth annual exhibit at the Pirate co-op gallery, there are references to edibles everywhere: plants and animals, supe...

    by Michael Paglia on April 26, 1995
  • Article

    HIGH NOTES

    What you want from a farce is to laugh at yourself and everyone else whose self-absorption gets them into trouble. And you want the protagonist, however ridiculous he is, to triumph in the end. The lively Lend Me a Tenor at the Aurora Fox is divertin...

    on April 26, 1995
  • Article

    SOUL FEUD

    One of the most marvelous of medieval tales is the story of Faust, who sold his soul to the Devil for either knowledge, wealth, youth or sex, depending on who's doing the telling. Among the most appealing versions of the cautionary tale is a contempo...

    on April 26, 1995
  • Article

    VENICE ANYONE

    The inaugural show for Pismo Gallery's new space in Cherry Creek is a splendid survey of recent work by Dale Chihuly, the prominent glass sculptor from Washington state. Chihuly is represented by many examples of his most characteristic work, groups ...

    on April 19, 1995
  • Article

    BAUHAUS ON BROADWAY

    In a sense, modern art came to the United States because of World War II. Hitler, like some of the more extreme right-wingers of our own time, hated modernism. Among his earliest targets were the artists and architects of the famous Bauhaus school, w...

    by Michael Paglia on April 19, 1995
  • Article

    STARR KEMPF, 1917-1995

    Renowned modern sculptor Starr Kempf was found dead April 7 at his Pine Grove Avenue studio in Colorado Springs. Police said Kempf, 77, appeared to have died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. Kempf was best known for his ambitious steel kineti...

    by Michael Paglia on April 19, 1995
  • Article

    IT'LL ADO

    The Compass Theatre Company's Much Ado About Nothing needs more room. The cramped space of the Dorie studio in the Denver Civic Theatre is more suited to smaller casts. But restricted as the actors are, they still manage to bustle, run, stand in elab...

    on April 19, 1995
  • Article

    MAD ABOUT YOU

    Christopher Selbie is a lot older than any Hamlet I've ever seen, and he's more manic-depressive than melancholic. But if his performance is quirky, it's also remarkable--and it turns the Compass Theatre Company's production of Shakespeare's Hamlet, ...

    on April 19, 1995
  • Article

    HAPPY TRAILS

    Eric Zimmer, a relatively new member of the Edge Gallery co-op as well as a relative newcomer to Denver, currently fills Edge's front gallery with an ambitious display of quirky paintings and paper pieces. The paintings are closely interrelated and m...

    by Michael Paglia on April 12, 1995
  • Article

    I.M. PISSED

    I'll be as clear as glass. It is an act of barbarism to even raise the question of whether I. M. Pei's Zeckendorf Plaza is worth preserving, let alone to threaten it with destruction, as St. Louis-based absentee landlord Fred Kummer has. The plaza ra...

    by Michael Paglia on April 12, 1995
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From the Print Edition

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

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I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

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Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

Representational imagery shines at Havu

Rather than throw together a group show featuring work by artists whose work is unconnected, for its current exhibit, Articulated Perspectives, the William Havu Gallery focused on four artists who… More >>

Rajiv Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries is a cut above

Jamie Wollrab works in Los Angeles as a director, actor and acting coach, but he grew up in Boulder and loves Colorado. "My family lives here," he says, "and they… More >>

Now Playing

I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Chris Richter. Back in March, gallery director Bobbi Walker realized that her planned June slot had come apart and that she needed to come up with somebody fast. At the… More >>

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