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  • Article

    Strauss Hunt

    The conducting style of Richard Strauss stood in marked contrast to the flamboyant antics of other twentieth-century maestros. In fact, violinist Yehudi Menuhin once noted, when Strauss took to the podium, there was very little evidence that the grea...

    by Jim Lillie on April 30, 1998
  • Article

    History Lessons

    Near the end of Henrik Ibsen's 1879 play A Doll House, Nora is compelled to choose between living with her patronizing husband or leaving him (and her adoring children) in order to pursue an independent life of self-realization. After a gut-wrenching...

    by Jim Lillie on April 30, 1998
  • Article

    Patterns That Connect

    Anyone even remotely interested in tracing the course of contemporary art in Colorado over the past few decades will want to take in a pair of marvelous shows that focus on major, established local artists. But move fast--they're closing soon. The Bo...

    by Michael Paglia on April 23, 1998
  • Article

    Break a (Third) Leg

    Before you declare once and for all your utter disinterest in the private lives (not to mention the private parts) of public figures, take a gander at British playwright Alan Bennett's intellectual farce, Kafka's Dick. Far more than an underhanded ja...

    by Jim Lillie on April 23, 1998
  • Article

    Ballast From the Past

    In the days when radio was king, Americans seemed as united in spirit as at any point in their history. True, much of what was broadcast was merely sweet-sounding, thinly veiled propaganda (FDR's Fireside Chats, for instance, weren't much more than f...

    by Jim Lillie on April 23, 1998
  • Article

    About Face

    There haven't been many negatives this past year for local lovers of photography. The hail of impressive shows began last spring with an exhibit at the Emmanuel Gallery that brought together some of Denver's best talents. Then came a display of photo...

    by Michael Paglia on April 16, 1998
  • Article

    High Notes

    By virtually every account, the Broadway musical is booming. At last tally, a score of productions were playing to near-record crowds on the Great White Way. Of course, this spate of musical entertainment contains its share of theme-park shtick meant...

    by Jim Lillie on April 16, 1998
  • Article

    Big Mac Attack

    A quick inventory of the Shakespearean actor's stock-in-trade includes qualities such as an expressive voice and body, a fertile imagination, and a devotion to spiritual truth tempered by a carnival barker's sense of showmanship. But when it com...

    by Jim Lillie on April 9, 1998
  • Article

    The Lack of the Irish

    At first glance, the Shop's tiny stage seems a poor choice to house a production of Irish playwright Brian Friel's Dancing at Lughnasa. In fact, the cramped confines of the storefront theater appear especially ill-suited to the emotional climax of Fr...

    by Jim Lillie on April 9, 1998
  • Article

    Earth, Wind and Fire

    Remarkable achievements in craft traditions are on display in two local shows. At Cherry Creek's Pismo, Lino Tagliapietra, a living legend of Venetian glassmaking, is the subject of a self-titled solo show. Up in Golden, it's the Colorado Clay Exhibi...

    by Michael Paglia on April 2, 1998
  • Article

    Harlem Renaissance

    Crying at the top of her lungs, "I'm sick of Negro dreams--all they ever do is break your heart!" a middle-aged woman flails away with her fists at the one man who promises he'll rescue her from her dead-end existence. For one brief, glorious moment,...

    by Jim Lillie on April 2, 1998
  • Article

    Irish Eyes

    No single event stamps its imprint more indelibly on the body politic than the taking of a hostage. In fact, hostage situations involving American soldiers, journalists and businessmen have each proved the point that nothing--not internal racial disc...

    by Jim Lillie on April 2, 1998
  • Article

    A Thousand Words

    The Nazis had a perversely high regard for the arts. As early as 1933, Adolf Hitler's goons began a campaign against modern art, closing art schools, expelling modernist art teachers from German universities, and arresting and incarcerating scores of...

    by Michael Paglia on March 26, 1998
  • Article

    Return to Gender

    Playwright August Wilson was at Dartmouth College the other day, spouting off once again about why America needs a separate theater dedicated to the interests of African-Americans. White artists, Wilson has repeatedly argued, are simply ill-equipped ...

    by Jim Lillie on March 26, 1998
  • Article

    The New Yorkers

    The Round World gallery opened quietly last fall on the edge of downtown Denver, moving into a pair of rehabbed storefronts that share a red-brick Victorian building with the popular La Coupole French restaurant. It's an obscure location for an art g...

    by Michael Paglia on March 19, 1998
  • Article

    French Tickler

    President Clinton's 1993 appointment of actress Jane Alexander to head the National Endowment for the Arts was seen by many as a healthy sign for the embattled agency. After all, Alexander had enjoyed a distinguished career in the theater and was the...

    by Jim Lillie on March 19, 1998
  • Article

    That Girl

    Apart from angst-ridden playwrights, hostile audiences and long periods of unemployment, the greatest challenge faced by a professional actor is the tricky business of sharing the stage with children and small animals. W.C. Fields made hating kids do...

    by Jim Lillie on March 19, 1998
  • Article

    Vance Encounter

    Vance Kirkland was the biggest name in Denver's art world for much of the twentieth century. From the 1930s through the 1970s, he dominated the local art scene, not just as the city's premier modern painter, but also as an influential art teacher and...

    by Michael Paglia on March 12, 1998
  • Article

    Bard Copy

    William Shakespeare was, above all else, a practical man. The sheer majesty of his verse notwithstanding, the Bard of Avon became the world's greatest playwright because he told his versions of borrowed (some would say stolen) stories better than any...

    by Jim Lillie on March 12, 1998
  • Article

    Post Mortem

    It used to be that real estate developers actually had to have plans to build something new before the Denver City Council would let them demolish a historic building. But at the council meeting February 23, Denver developer Bruce Berger didn't have ...

    by Michael Paglia on March 5, 1998
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