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  • Article

    TAPPY DAYS

    The great movie and Broadway musicals of the 1930s seem both naive and extravagant in hindsight. Depression-era folk wanted to lose sight of their dreary poverty in visions of glittery gowns and lighthearted romances. The humor in these shows was usu...

    on September 6, 1995
  • Article

    PEEP SHOW

    The depiction of the nude figure in the fine arts isn't just ancient--it's genuinely age-old. In the Paleolithic cave paintings of France and Spain, usually seen as the oldest works of art on Earth, those famous bison and deer are being pursued by nu...

    by Michael Paglia on August 30, 1995
  • Article

    BEYOND BELIEF

    Sometimes you have to be beastly to be kind. And as beastly as Geniuses, Madmen, and Saints can be, all British playwright Peter Barnes's rage and wit is directed at what is most vicious and self-deceptive in human beings--particularly those who use ...

    on August 30, 1995
  • Article

    BIG TWANG THEORY

    You have to love country music--particularly country music from the early 1960s--to really get the most out of Always...Patsy Cline. It also helps if you like being part of the show, since the actors talk and sing directly to you and even draw indivi...

    on August 30, 1995
  • Article

    SPELL-BOUND

    A principal benefit of following the Denver art scene is the wealth of local artists who pursue their work oblivious to the shifting sands of contemporary trends. Sometimes, though, a solitary approach can lead an artist right into the middle of thos...

    by Michael Paglia on August 23, 1995
  • Article

    GOING UP

    For nearly twenty years, the Rocky Mountain Women's Institute has chosen a handful of writers, dancers, visual artists and others to receive "associateships"--essentially $1,000 stipends. Since the institute's founding in 1976, more than 100 individu...

    by Michael Paglia on August 23, 1995
  • Article

    CLASH DISMISSED

    Playwright David Mamet understands how people really converse. He articulates the rhythms of the inarticulate, because he grasps how hard it is sometimes to talk and think at once, even to finish sentences. The mind and the emotions race so far ahead...

    on August 23, 1995
  • Article

    POETRY IN MOTION

    "Poetry theater" as defined by the Denver troupe called the Open Rangers is part theater, part poetry, part dance, part music and part chutzpah. Sometimes exhilarating and sometimes embarrassing, the Open Rangers try for authentic and immediate artis...

    on August 23, 1995
  • Article

    THE JOY OF SIX

    Short plays, like short stories, must be skillfully wrought to involve the audience instantly, delivering their substance with comparatively little development. So their goals tend to be more modest than those of longer works, and their action more o...

    on August 16, 1995
  • Article

    PALL IN THE FAMILY

    A man lies dying, and his wife, his best friend, his grown children and his mistress gather in the next room to wait for his death. It soon becomes clear that the man was a public figure who made a lot of money and wielded a great deal of power. The ...

    on August 16, 1995
  • Article

    THE WRIGHT STUFF

    Buildings are among the most public of artifacts--they're really out there, literally. So it's a shame that most of Denver's built environment is so bad, more "narcotecture" than architecture. On the bright side, this sorry situation makes the go...

    by Michael Paglia on August 9, 1995
  • Article

    SHORT BUT SWEET

    The second series in The Changing Scene's annual festival of new plays called "Summerplay" opened last weekend with four short pieces as different from one another as fruit, vegetables, rocks and rice. Some of it is digestible, some of it isn't. But ...

    on August 9, 1995
  • Article

    THE MACK ATTACK

    When Bertolt Brecht first staged his scathing The Threepenny Opera in Berlin in 1928, it not only delighted his middle- and upper-class audiences, it made him money for the first time in his theater life. Maybe it was the sheer naughtiness of its wom...

    on August 9, 1995
  • Article

    HEART LAND

    Different people, different points of view: That's the modest message behind 10 Percent in Maple Grove--a collection of disconnected scenes about gay and straight interaction in a small Midwestern town. Playwright Mark Dunn's world-premiere show at J...

    on August 2, 1995
  • Article

    SAM'S CLUB

    Humphrey Bogart never actually said "Play it again, Sam" in Casablanca. But somehow the line has lived on and permeated the culture. It stands for the reckless, sophisticated tough guy Bogart usually played--the stuff of male role models for the last...

    on August 2, 1995
  • Article

    GONE WITH THE WIND

    Between the First World War and the 1930s, the United States experienced an internal population shift unprecedented in its history. More than 1 million rural blacks left their sharecropper farms in the South and came north in search of factory jobs a...

    by Michael Paglia on August 2, 1995
  • Article

    HIDE AND SEEK

    Abstract expressionism is the bane of the uninitiated. Paintings of this type have no discernable subject and typically look sloppy, covered with scribbles, drips and scratches. They're the kind of thing people are talking about when they say "My kid...

    by Michael Paglia on July 26, 1995
  • Article

    THIRTY-SOMETHINGS

    A major event in the local art world of the 1980s was the "21 Year Show," presented eleven years ago at the now-defunct Progresso Gallery. It displayed the works of a group of local artists 21 years after they came together at the University of Color...

    by Michael Paglia on July 26, 1995
  • Article

    KEEPING SCORE

    Musicals tend to be shallow, sentimental fun--a day in the park. But once in a while, one rolls along that actually has a little something to say. Three musicals now on the boards in Denver offer something beyond a quick escape, rousing tunes and sli...

    on July 26, 1995
  • Article

    SPACED OUT

    In recent years, Loveland has acquired a national reputation as the place where romantics and cornballs send their Valentine's Day cards to be canceled with a "Love-Land" postmark at the local post office (which, by the way, features some charming WP...

    by Michael Paglia on July 19, 1995
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Conceptual art takes over Gildar Gallery

For his latest show, Takeover, Gildar Gallery owner Adam Gildar enlisted the help of Charlie James, a Los Angeles-based art dealer, who curated the show. The two have a similar… More >>

The Odd Couple is a good match for Miners Alley

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Outside in 303.This summer feature at the Museo de las Amesricas is absolutely spectacular, with each of the included artists being given lots of space to stretch out. Conceived and… More >>

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Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

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I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

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Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

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