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  • Article

    Star of Stripes

    Sean Scully occupies a peculiar niche in the history of recent art. An unabashed modernist, he came of artistic age in the 1980s, an era dominated by an anti-modernist zeitgeist. The assault on modernism generally, and on abstract painting in particu...

    by Michael Paglia on July 23, 1998
  • Article

    Going Solo

    It's difficult to imagine anyone other than Christopher Plummer playing the title character in William Luce's Barrymore. In addition to maintaining his performer's lock on the role since the play premiered at Canada's prestigious Stratford Festival i...

    by Jim Lillie on July 23, 1998
  • Article

    Bewitched

    What happens when a man is forced to choose between the well-being of his children and the sanctity of his good name? Should John Proctor, the main character in Robert Ward's opera The Crucible, preserve his sons' inheritance by bending to the stiff-...

    by Jim Lillie on July 23, 1998
  • Article

    Do's and Don't's

    You may want to wash your hands after taking in the trio of oddball (a polite but accurate term) conceptual exhibits that fill the Boulder Museum of Contemporary Art this summer. While none are visually edifying, all three challenge conventional, and...

    by Michael Paglia on July 16, 1998
  • Article

    Local Vocals

    By virtually every account, the 18-to-34 age group is the fastest-growing segment of the opera-going public. Although no one can explain exactly why Baywatching channel-surfers from the MTV generation are hooked on an art form once renowned for its c...

    by Jim Lillie on July 16, 1998
  • Article

    Thermo Dynamics

    A cultural notion emanating from New York--as do so many--is that the art world closes down for the summer. While this may be true in that city, which wealthy collectors, gallery owners and artists alike abandon for the seashore during the dog days, ...

    by Michael Paglia on July 9, 1998
  • Article

    Unchained Melodrama

    In keeping with the melodrama that permeates Giacomo Puccini's Tosca, Central City Opera's opening-night performance featured as artist Cavaradossi understudy Chad Shelton, who in the last week of rehearsals replaced a star tenor sidelined by a ruptu...

    by Jim Lillie on July 9, 1998
  • Article

    Wooed Awakening

    Even though Love's Labour's Lost isn't one of William Shakespeare's best-known or best-loved plays, the lyrical, ornate story is yet another example of the sentient dramatist's incomparable ability to capture in verse the timeless truths about life's...

    by Jim Lillie on July 9, 1998
  • Article

    Metro on the Move

    Sally Perisho, the highly regarded director of Metropolitan State College's Center for the Visual Arts, has been at the eye of a whirlwind the past few weeks. Last month her gallery moved from the corner of Wazee and 17th Streets in LoDo to a pair of...

    by Michael Paglia on July 2, 1998
  • Article

    TV or Not TV? That's No Question

    Time was when an academic wit such as University of Colorado professor Sean Ryan Kelley wouldn't have thought twice about how to direct the opening production of the Colorado Shakespeare Festival. Like any other sensible college teacher, Kelley would...

    by Jim Lillie on July 2, 1998
  • Article

    Letter Perfect

    The great English actress Mrs. Patrick Campbell was nearly fifty years old when she created the role of Eliza Doolittle in George Bernard Shaw's most famous play, Pygmalion. And even though Campbell's acclaimed swan song marked the beginning of her s...

    by Jim Lillie on July 2, 1998
  • Article

    Shaping Up

    A new piece of public sculpture planned for the Denver Performing Arts Complex may yet displace the goofy entrance canopy at the Denver Art Museum as the most reviled object in the local art world. If the winning entry in a recent competition--Jonath...

    by Michael Paglia on June 18, 1998
  • Article

    A Titanic Feat

    Hollywood's neatly packaged lies have been both bane and beacon to playwright Jeffrey Hatcher. Even though Hatcher's farce about Thirties Tinseltown types, One Foot on the Floor, was given a rousing world-premiere production last year by the Denver C...

    by Jim Lillie on June 18, 1998
  • Article

    Patching a Plot

    Molly Newman and Barbara Damashek's joyous musical about pioneer life on the prairie, Quilters, couldn't have been mistaken for a Broadway success when it closed in September 1984 after a run of just 24 performances. But like another musical that fai...

    by Jim Lillie on June 18, 1998
  • Article

    Rebels With Causes

    Contemporary art has fractured into innumerable directions and styles since the 1970s, but the situation has never been as wildly pluralistic as it is today. For proof of this diversity, see three current shows at two very different local venues. But...

    by Michael Paglia on June 11, 1998
  • Article

    Sisterhood Act

    Feminism is the main character in Parallel Lives: The Best of the Kathy & Mo Show, now on stage at the Avenue Theatre under the hit-and-miss direction of Michael McGoff. A pared-down version of the off-Broadway hit originally written and performed by...

    by Jim Lillie on June 11, 1998
  • Article

    The Impossible Dreck

    Upon exiting the Space Theatre after a recent performance of the Denver Center Theatre Company's current production of Don Quixote, a boy no older than twelve turned to his mother and said, "That was even weirder than The Master of Two Servants." To ...

    by Jim Lillie on June 11, 1998
  • Article

    Crime Still Pays

    Alarming as the re-emergence of Seventies clothing and musical styles might be, one of that period's most influential musicals, Chicago, resonates well with modern audiences. That's because society has finally fulfilled late director/choreographer/au...

    by Jim Lillie on June 4, 1998
  • Article

    Combat Fatigue

    The beginning moments of local dramatist M. Scott Merrifield's play Desert Air are full of promise. As the Changing Scene's world-premiere production of this Gulf War-era drama begins, the strains of a popular rock song ("Video Killed the Radio Star"...

    by Jim Lillie on June 4, 1998
  • Article

    Mummies Dearest

    On a recent sunny afternoon, Denver Art Museum director Lewis Sharp was standing under the museum's still-controversial entrance canopy on Acoma Plaza. Not that the canopy provides any shade: Though workers began erecting it last fall, it's still not...

    by Michael Paglia on May 28, 1998
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