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  • Article

    BITCH, BITCH, BITCH

    The movies did it better. "Women's pictures" such as All About Eve, The Women and even The Bad Seed, for all their melodramatic silliness, at least presented complex and interesting female characters. But Ruthless! The Musical, which is supposed to b...

    on July 12, 1995
  • Article

    STREET PEOPLE

    The black-and-white photos of Don Donaghy are often out of focus, overexposed and underlighted, so it's no surprise to learn that Donaghy has never used a light meter. But as Photographs From the Street, a retrospective of Donaghy's 1960s work now at...

    by Michael Paglia on July 5, 1995
  • Article

    KILLERS' INSTINCT

    Two million Jews and tens of thousands of other prisoners were tortured and killed at Auschwitz. Because the numbers are so staggering, it is excruciatingly difficult to absorb the fact that each of those millions died an individual death, that each ...

    on July 5, 1995
  • Article

    THE HE-MAN CONDITION

    Robert Dubac is so lively, witty and inventive, it's easy to forgive the mild chauvinism that runs through his riotous one-man show at the Vogue Theatre, The Male Intellect (An Oxymoron). With a title like this one, you might suppose the writer/actor...

    on July 5, 1995
  • Article

    ONE-STOP SHOPPING

    Kathy Andrews was named curator for the Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities only about a year ago. But she's already come through with a must-see show. A Gathering of Galleries/A Gathering of Artists is an exciting look at the art market in Den...

    by Michael Paglia on June 21, 1995
  • Article

    READY TEDDY

    Being a bear of very little brain, Winnie the Pooh could hardly be expected to figure out his problems for himself. And in Winnie the Pooh, playwright Kristin Sergel's version of the children's favorite, Pooh needs all his friends to help him. Sergel...

    on June 21, 1995
  • Article

    GROWING PAINS

    If it were television, it might be a soap opera; if it were an old movie, it might be what they used to call a "chick flick." Joanna M. Glass's Artichoke is all about a sensitive woman caught between a male world and an irrational morality that keeps...

    on June 21, 1995
  • Article

    BLACK ACHE

    Odd as it may seem, Denver hasn't always been the art-making hub of Colorado. From the nineteenth century up to the 1970s, Colorado Springs was the home of our most important contemporary art scene. And it was there that a loosely affiliated group fo...

    by Michael Paglia on June 14, 1995
  • Article

    SHELTER-SKELTER

    Everyone on earth has a purpose, homeless Betty declares, and hers is to act as a mirror--the one you can't get away from when you leave the bathroom. In her is reflected the whole human condition, and playwright Joe Turner Cantu wants us to gaze lon...

    on June 14, 1995
  • Article

    RETURN TO GENDER

    The Industrial Arts Theatre Company's Goddesses is equal parts sense and nonsense. Written by company member Mary Guzzy-Siegel in collaboration with five other women in the company, it can be witty and charming at times and embarrassing and didactic ...

    on June 14, 1995
  • Article

    GET REAL

    In Denver, like everywhere else, there are two highly distinct and opposing camps when it comes to the fine arts. There are the artists associated with a number of contemporary movements, and there are those who embrace more traditional styles. The r...

    by Michael Paglia on June 7, 1995
  • Article

    BRITTLE WOMEN

    Four women inhabit a mansion in hell (provincial France circa the 1930s), and the horror they experience there is as dark as it gets on earth. Wendy Kesselman's relentless exploration of class hatred and oppression in My Sister in This House amounts ...

    on June 7, 1995
  • Article

    SUGAR RUSH

    It doesn't matter how sappy the music is, the kids are what sells Rodgers and Hammerstein's classic The Sound of Music. The Country Dinner Playhouse's revival features seven terrific kids, and every time they're on stage, the whole production lifts a...

    on June 7, 1995
  • Article

    MOVING MOUNTAINS

    The husband-and-wife team of Tracy and Sushe Felix emerged from the free-for-all that was 1980s art in Colorado. The Manitou Springs couple was associated with a hip, cartoonlike approach that was part and parcel of the neo-expressionism that dominat...

    by Michael Paglia on May 31, 1995
  • Article

    HEIR JORDAN

    Louis Jordan was an ingenious saxophonist, vocalist and songwriter whose energetic music lit up radio airwaves in the 1940s and continued to delight audiences into the 1960s. Roll Jordan Roll, at the Denver Civic Theatre, celebrates the moment in Jor...

    on May 31, 1995
  • Article

    OKIE DOKE

    Humorist and movie star Will Rogers made political satire a gentle art. The Oklahoma country boy once said he never met a man he didn't like, and that kindly sentiment even governed the way he skewered politicians. The Will Rogers Follies celebrates ...

    on May 31, 1995
  • Article

    LOCAL COLOR

    The Mackey Gallery is as filled with color as a spring garden. But bright hues are about the only common ground shared by the two very different artists on display. Lynn Heitler's work falls readily within the tradition of abstract expressionism....

    by Michael Paglia on May 24, 1995
  • Article

    NAKED CITY

    Two respected Denver artists, Dan Ragland and Bill Stockman, offer more reasons to respect them, with new work displayed in separate exhibits at the Grant Gallery. Most of Ragland's somber, mixed-media pieces started out as Polaroids. Although th...

    by Michael Paglia on May 24, 1995
  • Article

    LOCAL ZERO

    When a scumbag becomes a TV talk-show celebrity, the world is in trouble. And so English playwright Alan Ayckbourn skewers the cult of the celebrity, the mendacity of television and the public's infinite appetite for manipulative trash in Man of the ...

    on May 24, 1995
  • Article

    KILLING TIME

    Intense, ingenious and shocking, Steven Dietz's God's Country is also appallingly timely. After the Oklahoma bombing and all the recent press about so-called patriot militias, a powerful play about the murder of liberal Jewish radio talk-show host Al...

    on May 24, 1995
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Conceptual art takes over Gildar Gallery

For his latest show, Takeover, Gildar Gallery owner Adam Gildar enlisted the help of Charlie James, a Los Angeles-based art dealer, who curated the show. The two have a similar… More >>

The Odd Couple is a good match for Miners Alley

There's not a lot of nourishment in Neil Simon's The Odd Couple, which premiered on Broadway in 1965, spawned a film and television show, and is now showing at Miners… More >>

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Outside in 303.This summer feature at the Museo de las Amesricas is absolutely spectacular, with each of the included artists being given lots of space to stretch out. Conceived and… More >>

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Henry IV, Part 1. King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily… More >>

Outside in 303 brings street art inside at the Museo

The Museo de las Americas is making its mark this summer with Outside in 303, an incredible show that gives a glimpse into the scene of Latino taggers that have… More >>

Phamaly puts on a transcendent Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat

For some in a Phamaly Theatre Company production, just getting out of bed, dressing and arriving at rehearsal is a grueling ordeal. The group — once known as the Physically… More >>

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I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

Now Showing

Articulated Perspectives.Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The exhibit,… More >>

Colorado Shakespeare Festival's <i>Henry IV, Part I</i>, is honor bound Colorado Shakespeare Festival's Henry IV, Part I, is honor bound

King Henry IV gained the throne by deposing his predecessor, Richard II, and having him murdered, and in Henry IV, Part 1, the crown lies uneasily on his head. He's… More >>

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

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