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  • Article

    EDGE OF NOIR

    At the Cafe Noir, everyone wears black and white--or they get picked on by the actors. The cast of this interactive theater piece, now being staged by Mystery Cabaret West at Catalano's Catered Affair, helps serve and clear a four-course dinner durin...

    on March 15, 1995
  • Article

    POP GOES THE EASEL

    Kevin Barry tries to zero in on a painter's life in The Secret of Durable Pigments, now in its premiere production at the Changing Scene. The playwright creates a number of interesting little portraits--the artist's mother, his best friend, his kindl...

    on March 8, 1995
  • Article

    Flying Blind: The Art at DIA is mostly DOA.

    Pity Denver. It's the Rodney Dangerfield of American cities--it can't get no respect. Regardless of what's done here, negative national attention seems to follow. DIA is the most recent case in point. The new airport is nationally renowned not for it...

    by Michael Paglia on March 8, 1995
  • Article

    HOLY MATRIMONY!

    The production of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers at the Country Dinner Playhouse is clean, lively, ingeniously choreographed and fetchingly performed family entertainment. But this rollicking story, based on the 1954 MGM film of the same name, does ...

    on March 8, 1995
  • Article

    STERLING SERLING

    Mountain McClintock never took a dive--it's the one thing the aging boxer is proud of, the one shred of dignity he still owns. But the hero of Rod Serling's sagacious Requiem for a Heavyweight has a dignity he doesn't recognize, a small flame of inte...

    on March 1, 1995
  • Article

    GIRL TALK

    Truth hides in the details. The regional premiere of Parallel Lives, at Jack's Theatre, zeroes in on the particulars of women's lives, especially as they interact with men--and gets the Big Picture right. Based on The Kathy and Mo Show, by Mo Gaffney...

    on March 1, 1995
  • Article

    BUFFALO GUYS

    Half Native American and half African-American, the title character of Carlyle Brown's Buffalo Hair struggles to make sense of his racial identity. That internal battle, refracted in the lives of several other mixed-race characters, forms the central...

    on February 22, 1995
  • Article

    BIG BAD WOOLF

    Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is a whinefest under the best of circumstances. The four characters reveal their secret sufferings in convoluted party games and end by eviscerating each other's fragile emotional guts in a stupefying al...

    on February 22, 1995
  • Article

    AT THE FLOP

    At the end of the opening-night performance of Grease, former Monkees heartthrob Mickey Dolenz hushes the applauding audience at the Temple Buell Theater and says, "If you like us, tell your friends. If you didn't like us, tell them you saw Cats." ...

    on February 15, 1995
  • Article

    WAR AS HELL

    Playwright Robert Shaver sets his new play, Slavia and Hugo, in a horrific, blood-smeared, body-littered clinic. An atmosphere of degradation and torture lurks, monsterlike, and with it the anti-war message of this harsh absurdist parable. War waged ...

    on February 15, 1995
  • Article

    NET WORTH

    The mysterious Internet, a computerized environment once inhabited only by government scientists, is becoming more and more consumer-friendly. Although the cyberhighway can be jammed with trivia, its potential is enormous--particularly in the field o...

    by Hart Hill on February 8, 1995
  • Article

    FLAT EARTH SOCIETY

    In playwright Keith Reddin's Nebraska, even peacetime military life can be hell. And this Industrial Arts production leaves the viewer drained as Reddin delves into the loneliness, insecurities and futile adulteries plaguing the lives of his characte...

    on February 8, 1995
  • Article

    BOSTON BAKED BEINGS

    When a man lives under a cloud of fear, forever expecting a deluge, he may not notice that he's already soaked to the skin and trembling. In the caustic comedy-drama Later Life, now in a superb production at the Avenue Theater, playwright A.R. Gurney...

    on February 8, 1995
  • Article

    GIRL TROUBLE

    Full of snowy paper and sleek framing, Female Problems, a new show of mixed-media photo-based art at Emmanuel Gallery, seems as crisp, white and sterile as a hospital operating room. On closer examination, however, the pristine mood is shattered by r...

    by Hart Hill on February 1, 1995
  • Article

    OVERBLOWN

    A new play from a young playwright is almost always rocky terrain. The Denver Center Theatre Company's production of Keith Glover's Coming of the Hurricane is no exception, though Israel Hicks's distinguished direction does much to smooth the way for...

    on February 1, 1995
  • Article

    RUSSIAN DRESSING

    Capitalism doesn't always equal freedom, especially in the arts. That's the bitter pill served up by Nagle Jackson's The Quick-Change Room at the Denver Center Theatre Company. The message goes down easily--sweetened by Jackson's piquant humor--but i...

    on February 1, 1995
  • Article

    THEIR AIM IS TRUE

    Here in Colorado, we get more than our share of "pretty" photographs of the West. These brilliantly colored fantasies portray a land full of unspoiled scenery, snow-capped peaks, green forests and crystalline lakes. But longtime residents know anothe...

    by Hart Hill on January 25, 1995
  • Article

    OLD MEN'S RIVER

    Mark Twain spins fitfully in his grave every time Bernard Sabath's execrable The Boys in Autumn plays again. Now this effort by a third-rate artiste to project his meager talents onto the work of one of his betters is playing at the Theatre at Muddy'...

    on January 25, 1995
  • Article

    THE GAY NINETIES

    Paul Rudnick's Jeffrey, now at the Theatre on Broadway, makes a plea for compassion in these days of AIDS. But his ideas about how a lover can best express that compassion are sometimes questionable. Rife with in-jokes and written primarily for t...

    on January 25, 1995
  • Article

    VITAL SIGNS

    Hard as it is to admit, Denver's alternative scene is aging. Well-established cooperative galleries such as Pirate and Spark are celebrating anniversaries well into the double digits, and many of their members now enjoy elder-statesman status. Housed...

    by Hart Hill on January 18, 1995
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From the Print Edition

Dahlia Square could become a garden spot -- but right now, plans are sowing dissension in the neighborhood

Decades ago, Dahlia Square was celebrated as the nation's largest African-American-owned shopping center, a vibrant hub in northeast Park Hill, the poorer -- and definitely blacker -- counterpart to integrated,… More >>

Representational imagery shines at Havu

Rather than throw together a group show featuring work by artists whose work is unconnected, for its current exhibit, Articulated Perspectives, the William Havu Gallery focused on four artists who… More >>

Rajiv Joseph's Gruesome Playground Injuries is a cut above

Jamie Wollrab works in Los Angeles as a director, actor and acting coach, but he grew up in Boulder and loves Colorado. "My family lives here," he says, "and they… More >>

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I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

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Chris Richter. Back in March, gallery director Bobbi Walker realized that her planned June slot had come apart and that she needed to come up with somebody fast. At the… More >>

The Arvada Center takes a leap with Unbound

The Arvada Center sits on a very large site, but until recently, the venue had never used the seventeen-acre field just to the south to showcase art. That changed when… More >>

Wed alert! Central City Opera is a fitting setting for The Marriage of Figaro

In the third act of Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro at Central City Opera, sopranos Sinead Mulhern and Anna Christy sing "Che Soave Zefiretto," the duet in which the Countess… More >>

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Articulated Perspectives. Summer is group-show time, and Bill Havu and Nick Ryan have put together a great exhibit that looks at artists who combine representational imagery with abstract sensibilities. The… More >>

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I Hate Hamlet. I Hate Hamlet is a bit like the curate's egg: hilariously funny in parts, and in others so idiotic that you're embarrassed for the actors. Why is… More >>

A Raymond Jonson solo offers art history at Z Art Department

Northern New Mexico is renowned for its vibrant art scene, and lots of attention has been paid to it, especially with regard to the region's art history. In the early… More >>

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