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  • Article

    Waller of Sound

    One of the great things about a show like Ain't Misbehavin' is its interactive dimension: The performers play directly to the audience members, who get to clap their hands and tap their feet in time with the boisterous, life-affirming music of Thomas...

    on June 20, 1996
  • Article

    Freedom of Expressionism

    In its relatively short history, the Center for the Visual Arts, Metropolitan State College's gallery in LoDo, has celebrated the diversity of the art world. Sally Perisho, the center's founding director, has paid special attention to art by women, g...

    by Michael Paglia on June 13, 1996
  • Article

    Tennessee After Dark

    A troubled mind struggling for decency, the neighborly hand held out to a wretched man--these are the elements of Tennessee Williams's The Night of the Iguana, for my money the most meaningful of all the great American playwright's works. Other Willi...

    on June 13, 1996
  • Article

    Hallelujah Chorus

    Gospel, the musical form that arose at the turn of the century with Pentecostal revivalism in African-American churches, has had a lasting and profound effect on American music during its century-long evolution. While rhythm and blues and soul took o...

    on June 13, 1996
  • Article

    Go Figure

    In spite of a century of modern art jam-packed with things like abstraction, minimalism and conceptualism, the venerable tradition of depicting the human figure in art has held on admirably. As the modernist twentieth century comes to a close, artist...

    by Michael Paglia on June 6, 1996
  • Article

    Of Pea I Sing

    Musicals seem to be the one theatrical form in which outright silliness is not only acceptable but desirable. A farce has to have some underlying intelligence, some razor-sharp insight into manners and mores, in order to satisfy. But a musical needs ...

    on June 6, 1996
  • Article

    Junior's Achievement

    Much of what makes us laugh in comedy arises out of pain. And Dale Stewart's subversive, poignant comedy Harvey's Boy is sore all over. However, there's nothing morbid or crass about this one-man show. Stewart's reminiscences about his childhood and ...

    on June 6, 1996
  • Article

    Mind Bender

    He's midway through his solo exhibit at the Close Range Gallery of the Denver Art Museum, but Phil Bender still acts embarrassed about all the attention. In fact, Bender's taken an "Aw, shucks" approach--which works perfectly with his thick Texas dra...

    by Michael Paglia on May 30, 1996
  • Article

    Worn Souls

    The archetypal story of Beauty and the Beast has taken many, many forms in practically every culture of the world. The most common of these involves a beautiful woman falling in love with a prince who has been hexed into ugliness. In other forms of t...

    on May 30, 1996
  • Article

    Moon Mullings

    Part myth-making, part absurdist exercise, part political allegory and part youthful hell-raising, The Eclipse of Lawry, by Gwylym Cano, is fun, stimulating theater. It's hard to follow some of the dialogue, since the repartee rips rather fast and is...

    on May 30, 1996
  • Article

    Sweeney...Why We Miss Him

    The construction of Denver International Airport has meant many things to many people. For most of us, DIA has meant an extra hour or two of travel just to get to and from the remote facility. To many who were more intimately involved, especially in ...

    by Michael Paglia on May 23, 1996
  • Article

    Lemon Lime

    Anthony Zerbe is one terrific character actor. He has appeared in dozens of movies and TV shows, as villains or good guys, disappearing into his roles and yet always remaining distinctly himself. I remember seeing his remarkable Richard III at the Ol...

    on May 23, 1996
  • Article

    Biercesome Foursome

    A whole section of seats has been removed at the Theatre at Jack's to make way for the Civil War as only American journalist and author Ambrose Bierce could envision it--and as only CityStage Ensemble would stage it. Bitten by a Snake is creator/dire...

    on May 23, 1996
  • Article

    Little Rickeys

    It was in mid-March that Paul Hughes, director of the venerable, twenty-something Inkfish Gallery, announced that he would mount an in-depth exhibit of thirty mostly small works by New York-based kinetic sculptor George Rickey. That fine exhibit, Geo...

    by Michael Paglia on May 16, 1996
  • Article

    Hills-a-Poppin'

    It's the music that matters most in Appalachian Strings. But the vibrant production now at the Denver Center Theatre Company is also a history, both of "hillbilly" music and of the people of Appalachia. The writing in this engaging piece is sometimes...

    on May 16, 1996
  • Article

    Lady in Waiting

    There may be more people on stage than in the audience, but the crowded space in the small Dorie Theatre is alive with ferocious goofiness in The Madwoman of Chaillot. Dated and simplistic as Jean Giraudoux's 1945 tale may be, it still carries the mo...

    on May 16, 1996
  • Article

    Heavy Metal

    Denver's really starting to look and act like a big city. The traffic in town is getting worse by the day. There's no place to park either downtown or in Cherry Creek. And we now have a Mark di Suvero sculpture, "Lao Tzu," sited on Acoma Plaza at the...

    by Michael Paglia on May 9, 1996
  • Article

    ...and Tuning In

    And now for some socially redeeming theater: Ojibwa Indian poet and playwright Tomson Highway's poignant contemporary exploration of Native American life, The Rez Sisters, at the Ralph Waldo Emerson Center. Once in a while a play comes along tha...

    on May 9, 1996
  • Article

    Tuning Out ...

    Film critics used to grouse about how stage plays never really transfer well to the screen--at least until Kenneth Branagh started transforming Shakespeare into cinema. And yet a well-written play provides smart dialogue, even when the setting is too...

    on May 9, 1996
  • Article

    Garden Pests

    Unlike in many American cities, just about every tree, shrub, plant and vine in Denver has been planted and cared for by someone. As early as the 1880s, people were bringing blue spruce trees down from the mountains and planting them among the scrub ...

    by Michael Paglia on May 2, 1996
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From the Print Edition

Five Reasons Why It Would Be Stupid to Demolish Boettcher Concert Hall

Michael Paglia isn't a big fan of the City & County of Denver when it comes to architectural and artistic decisions. After all, he writes, officials there have fumbled everything… More >>

Jamie Ann Romero Exits Denver for the Bright Lights of New York City

Every now and then, you realize you're watching a genuine star. Not just a very good, emotionally generous actor who makes intellectually interesting choices, but someone possessed of a quality… More >>

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Angela Beloian and Roger Hubbard. For In Technicolor, her new exhibit at Walker Fine Art, Boulder artist Angela Beloian created a body of retro '60s and '70s paintings and screen… More >>

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On Golden Pond. As this play opens, Norman and Ethel Thayer are moving back into their summer house in Maine. Every summer for 48 years, he's come here to fish… More >>

Mack & Mabel: The Script Bores, but the Music Soars

Mack & Mabel purports to tell the story of the confused and conflicted love between Mack Sennett, impresario of the early comic silent movies, and Mabel Normand, the young woman… More >>

The DAM's Tom Wesselmann Show Is a Lesson in Art History

Michael Paglia has been writing about the art scene in Denver and Front Range for twenty years, following the latest shows, trends and news at museums and galleries. Read his… More >>

Now Showing

Angela Beloian and Roger Hubbard. For In Technicolor, her new exhibit at Walker Fine Art, Boulder artist Angela Beloian created a body of retro '60s and '70s paintings and screen… More >>

Now Playing

On Golden Pond. As this play opens, Norman and Ethel Thayer are moving back into their summer house in Maine. Every summer for 48 years, he's come here to fish… More >>

Ignite Theatre's Rent Has Room to Grow

The audience for Ignite Theatre's Rent is large, boisterous, young, and deeply involved with the action. Throughout the evening, you hear hoots of appreciative laughter, empathetic breath intakes and murmurs,… More >>

Four Artists Explore the World of Codes at Sandra Phillips

Michael Paglia has been writing about the art scene in Denver and Front Range for twenty years, following the latest shows, trends and news at museums and galleries. See his… More >>

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