<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  166  |  ...  |  332  |  ...  |  498  |  ...  |  643  |  644  |  645  |  ...  |  664  |  Next Page >> 12861 - 12880 of 13274

  • Article

    What the Dickens

    "Marley was dead to begin with." Charles Dickens opened A Christmas Carol, his greatest ghost story and arguably the best secular Christmas tale ever written, with these strange, portentous words. In 150 years, the incredible success of the novella a...

    on December 19, 1996
  • Article

    Renaissance Men

    The arts and the sciences came together in the Renaissance in a way they never had before. Aristotle's limited universe, in which the sun and planets revolved around the Earth, was discarded in favor of Copernicus's more accurate assessment. And it w...

    on December 19, 1996
  • Article

    Lumps of Clay

    Clay is a material that occupies a special--or should that be peculiar?--place in the world of the visual arts. It is most often employed in the making of utilitarian objects such as cups, mugs and vases and is therefore relegated to the underworld o...

    by Michael Paglia on December 12, 1996
  • Article

    The X-Mas Files

    'Tis the season for gooey sentiments, so you'd better watch out if you're headed for the New Denver Civic's gangly rendition of Louisa May Alcott's classic Little Women. But there's no need to pout: The real thing is out there in theaterland this hol...

    on December 12, 1996
  • Article

    Museum Qualities

    In the last few years, two groups have emerged in Denver, each intent on establishing a museum of contemporary art as an alternative to the Denver Art Museum. For a long time the two groups were unknown to each other. (If only the Ocean Journey crowd...

    by Michael Paglia on December 5, 1996
  • Article

    Mama Tried

    Mama Rose is the stage mother from hell. The central character of Gypsy--now in a hardy production at the Arvada Center--might have been written up by psychiatrist M. Scott Peck in his classic case studies of evil. Apparently nobody in the late 1950s...

    on December 5, 1996
  • Article

    Lost at Sea

    So many words, so few ideas. In his tedious satire Was He Anyone?, playwright N.F. Simpson tries so hard to bite into the red tape surrounding governmental "charity" that he chokes on it. Not even the Hunger Artists Ensemble's talented cast can do mo...

    on December 5, 1996
  • Article

    Roots

    Cherry Creek has been in the news lately--and not just because of that dreadful "We have a whole district" advertising campaign. Even more prominent than that awkward attempt at self-promotion has been the hoopla surrounding the destruction of an anc...

    by Michael Paglia on November 28, 1996
  • Article

    Angelenos With Dirty Faces

    Life in Southern California is, yes, phony and flaky. Once in a while a movie or a play celebrates all that peculiar sunny fakery with affectionate parody (Steve Martin's L.A. Story comes to mind) or abject pessimism (Sam Shepard's anti-Hollywood pla...

    on November 28, 1996
  • Article

    The Lust Boys

    Sex is easy; love is hard. That's the point, no matter how fractured, of Theatre on Broadway's 2 Boys in a Bed on a Cold Winter's Night, a story that sets out to demonstrate just how difficult it is to make emotional connections these days. It's peop...

    on November 28, 1996
  • Article

    New Again

    Since the impressionists invented modernism nearly 150 years ago, relentless innovation has been the buzzword in contemporary painting. Newer has been better since at least the late nineteenth century, at which point new art trends started coming alo...

    by Michael Paglia on November 21, 1996
  • Article

    Pulpit Fiction

    Vulgar, irreverent and awash in cheap shots, Nunsense may be the silliest show in town. But despite its bad habits, this bit of fluff has one redeeming feature: The music is actually pretty darn good. Of course, it takes enormous energy to sell ...

    on November 21, 1996
  • Article

    Go, Girls

    Feminists are frequently accused of being humorless: "How many feminists does it take to screw in a lightbulb? One--and that isn't funny." But at least one troupe in town is proving there are laughs to be had among the little womyn. Unidentified Fema...

    on November 21, 1996
  • Article

    Hidden Treasures

    Although Mary Mackey announced a couple of months ago that her namesake gallery on the city's west side would close at the end of the year, it now appears the gallery will remain open at least into 1997. No such uncertainty, however, surrounds the li...

    by Michael Paglia on November 14, 1996
  • Article

    Ghoul's Paradise

    Think of Edvard Munch's eerie painting "The Scream" and you get a pretty good idea of how Stephen Mallatratt's play The Woman in Black affects an audience. Ad Hoc Theatre's intense, ingenious production of Mallatratt's ghost story is truly creepy. No...

    on November 14, 1996
  • Article

    Stalk Soup

    From the beginning of Stephen Sondheim's tragic musical romance Passion, we realize there's something screwy about the notion of "love" promoted in this kinky tale. It's a sort of Fatal Attraction meets Beauty and the Beast--but without the tidy endi...

    on November 14, 1996
  • Article

    Mile-High Offense

    Ignorance is bliss, but in Denver's art world, it's much more than that. These days it's seen as being the best indicator of personal integrity. A good example of this can be found in the city's approach to public art. In that arena, art discipl...

    by Michael Paglia on November 7, 1996
  • Article

    Vision Impossible

    The most important thing Bruce Friel does in his latest play, Molly Sweeney, is expose the double-edged nature of so-called medical miracles. If he'd have thought more deeply about the subject, he might have made a genuine work of art. As it is, he h...

    on November 7, 1996
  • Article

    Out for a Spin

    Election season is fraught with rhetoric, innuendo, accusation and hyperbole. Facts are twisted, motives interpreted and failings magnified--each candidate spins his own image and spins the other guy's, too. And this is the way it has always been in ...

    on November 7, 1996
  • Article

    Way Out East

    In the last thirty years, Japan has gone a long way toward establishing total world domination of the camera industry. At both the high and low ends of the market, Japanese cameras--Pentax, Canon, Minolta, Nikon--aren't just the ones that predominate...

    by Michael Paglia on October 31, 1996
<< Previous Page  |  1  |  ...  |  166  |  ...  |  332  |  ...  |  498  |  ...  |  643  |  644  |  645  |  ...  |  664  |  Next Page >> 12861 - 12880 of 13274
Denver Concert Tickets

Find an Arts Event

Loading...