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  • Article

    BANG THE DRUMM SLOWLY

    Resignation to suffering is the best playwright Hugh Leonard can offer as resolution to the accumulated pain of a lifetime. But the strength of his humanist viewpoint in A Life lies in its cultivated compassion. The Denver Victorian Playhouse product...

    on October 25, 1995
  • Article

    LATINO LOVERS

    Director Israel Hicks zeroes in on Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet with fervor and style in his new telling of the classic tale at the Denver Center Theatre Company. He has the temerity to set the greatest of Shakespeare's cautionary tales in old Cali...

    on October 18, 1995
  • Article

    GUARE NOIR

    Toward the end of John Guare's tragicomic Landscape of the Body, one of the characters tells us that the mystery is always greater than the solution. This sentiment (seen most recently in the movie thriller Seven) may be oh so au courant, but it may ...

    on October 18, 1995
  • Article

    AGONY AND ECSTASY

    Expressing a variety of minority views through art is the goal of two exhibits currently on view at Golden's Foothills Art Center. According to center director Carol Dickinson, the shows also are intended to reflect how minority artists can use their...

    by Michael Paglia on October 18, 1995
  • Article

    ABSTRACT CONCEPTS

    Several current local shows zero in on the renewed vitality of abstract art in the Nineties. Chief among these are the group exhibit Reinventing the Abstract, at the Mackey Gallery, and a single-artist display, Gary Passanise, at the CSK Gallery. ...

    by Michael Paglia on October 18, 1995
  • Article

    FRONTIER WOMEN

    It truly is fall in Denver, and the trees themselves are coming down along with the leaves. Given this loss to our visual environment, it's some solace that another, more expected feature of autumn also has arrived: the start of high season for the a...

    by Michael Paglia on October 11, 1995
  • Article

    MONK BUSINESS

    Thomas Merton, it's fair to say, was an individual worth writing a play about. An American monk who lived a hermetic life out in the woods, he nevertheless kept up a mighty correspondence with many of the greatest writers of his age during a literary...

    on October 11, 1995
  • Article

    BIBLE CAMP

    It may be juvenile, brash and silly here and there, but Andrew Lloyd Webber's Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat ultimately transcends its own naivete with delightful exuberance and dazzling production values. From lyricist Tim Rice's humor...

    on October 11, 1995
  • Article

    BUCKBOARDS

    Museum-quality art can often be found at LoDo's Robischon Gallery. Rarely, though, are the gallery's three display spaces all devoted to the work of a single artist, as they are in the current exhibit John Buck--New Work. The special treatment is...

    by Michael Paglia on October 4, 1995
  • Article

    BROADWAY LIMITED

    The third play of Neil Simon's autobiographical trilogy, Broadway Bound, is only ankle deep. But the wading is both more pleasant and more interesting than in the first two plays in the series, Brighton Beach Memoirs and Biloxi Blues. This last play ...

    on October 4, 1995
  • Article

    SMELL OF THE HOUSEPAINT

    In a Pentecostal church near 11th Avenue and Acoma Street in downtown Denver, a corps of volunteer carpenters is busy building the only Elizabethan-style stage in Denver--and a one-of-a-kind theater arts facility. The church, where a small congre...

    on October 4, 1995
  • Article

    GOING, GOING--GONE

    Lately, and increasingly, museums across the country and around the world have begun "deaccessioning"--selling off parts of their existing collections as a ready source of "free money" to pay for new acquisitions. It's money, more than art, that's ha...

    by Michael Paglia on September 27, 1995
  • Article

    KEEPING HIS COMPOSER

    The Aurora Fox Theatre's striking production of Peter Shaffer's Amadeus proves once again that one can abhor the sentiments of a playwright and still find depth, meaning and mastery in his work. But it takes an ingenious performance or two, luminous ...

    on September 27, 1995
  • Article

    STIFF UPPER BRITS

    Reviving the quintessential Fifties drama is no easy matter; so many of the values and beliefs of the period seem dated. The best approach is to be as true to the period as possible. Director Jeremy Cole takes Terence Rattigan's charming Separate Tab...

    on September 27, 1995
  • Article

    GETTING EVEN

    One can respect a play and hate it at the same time. Drawn in to the premise completely, you can ultimately feel manipulated, and finally angry. Ariel Dorfman's Death and the Maiden is just such a play--capable of awakening the darkest revenge fantas...

    on September 20, 1995
  • Article

    PHOTOGRAPHY TODAY

    Words, just like art objects, are subject to fashion. Suddenly everyone is using the word "venerable" or mouthing a phrase like "narrative content." Everywhere I go these days, artists, especially those associated with the alternative scene, are talk...

    by Michael Paglia on September 20, 1995
  • Article

    THE PARENT RAP

    Parents are difficult in every culture. If they're kind, loving people who only want the best for their adult children, they can be pretty darn willful about just what that "best" might be. So grown-up offspring have to find ingenious ways of asserti...

    on September 20, 1995
  • Article

    GLASS ACT

    People often talk about art when they're actually referring to something else. We hear about the art of the deal, the art of medicine. There's the art of cooking. And the art of politics. Even the art of baseball. Aren't comedians and rock stars call...

    by Michael Paglia on September 13, 1995
  • Article

    STILL A KILLER

    It's impossible to beat Alfred Hitchcock at his own game. Nobody could remake Dial "M" for Murder as a movie and make it work. But Frederick Knott's 1950s crime play still crackles oddly on the stage. And Hunger Artists' stylish production, though in...

    on September 13, 1995
  • Article

    TRUE VOICES

    Once in a while a glimpse of something special comes through in a theatrical event. And Voices of the Children: The World of Brundibar is special. This is community theater as it should be: beautifully mounted, intelligent, moving and a little raw ar...

    on September 13, 1995
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