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  • Article

    Up in Lights

    It was with the idea of "breaking the winter doldrums" that Emmanuel Gallery director Carol Keller organized the compelling installation exhibit Ed & Stan at Emmanuel. Consider those doldrums broken. The "Ed" of the show's title is sculptor ...

    by Michael Paglia on January 29, 1998
  • Article

    What a Pair

    For the last thirty years, comedy writer Neil Simon has reigned as the king of America's community-theater circuit, where his plays are a favorite choice of groups strapped for cash, talent and time. Amateur performers need only speak the Pulitzer Pr...

    by Jim Lillie on January 29, 1998
  • Article

    God's Country

    Just when it appeared that the reputation of noted Christian apologist and children's book author (The Chronicles of Narnia) C.S. Lewis might naturally diminish with the passing of time, British playwright William Nicholson rescued the prolific write...

    by Jim Lillie on January 29, 1998
  • Article

    From Pillar to Post

    Downtown Denver has been home to nearly all of the largest, most expensive and most important buildings constructed in the Rocky Mountain region over the past 100 years. It's a history book written in stone. But there are some missing chapters. ...

    by Michael Paglia on January 22, 1998
  • Article

    The New Christie Minstrels

    As murder mysteries go, the Country Dinner Playhouse staging of Agatha Christie's The Hollow has much to recommend it. Bill McHale's well-directed show features a stellar cast of veteran actors. What's more, superb costumes from Nicole Hoof and a tas...

    by Jim Lillie on January 22, 1998
  • Article

    Soul on Ice

    Ask a professor of ancient history for an explanation of the architectural history of theaters, and he might tell you the large, circular dancing space that is the centerpiece of all Greek theaters took its inspiration from the threshing circles that...

    by Jim Lillie on January 22, 1998
  • Article

    Of Mice and Men

    New York-based artist and author Art Spiegelman is among the most important contemporary cartoonists in the world. And his considerable fame is based almost wholly on Maus, a sometimes hard-bound comic book first published in 1986 by Pantheon Books. ...

    by Michael Paglia on January 15, 1998
  • Article

    Pinter Fest

    British playwright Harold Pinter once confessed that his ear for dialogue is something of an acquired talent: He gleans some of his material from conversations overheard in bars and restaurants. In that respect, he's not much different from many othe...

    by Jim Lillie on January 15, 1998
  • Article

    Tour 'Da Force

    The overwhelming success of the Broadway tap-dance extravaganza, Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk might disappoint, dismay or even shock some musical-theater purists: There's no Fred Astaire clone as the show's main character. Instead, the unort...

    by Jim Lillie on January 15, 1998
  • Article

    Salon Selective

    Mark Sink is both a prominent Denver photographer and a member of a prominent local family. That explains why he's a tuxedo-clad semi-regular on the society pages of the city's dailies, typically seen in photographs with one or the other of his divor...

    by Michael Paglia on January 8, 1998
  • Article

    Getting a Clue

    "Get yourself some puppets, put 'em on ice skates, and you'll be a millionaire," laments one character in the Avenue Theater's interactive murder mystery Murder Most Fowl, a nine-year-old production that annually lampoons local celebrities and events...

    by Jim Lillie on January 8, 1998
  • Article

    Something New

    Why does Denver need yet another theater company? What can a new group producing plays in a downtown storefront theater offer us that older, more established theaters aren't already providing? People once asked those same questions about Chicago...

    by Jim Lillie on January 8, 1998
  • Article

    One Thumb Up

    Contemporary playwrights face the same nagging question each time they write a script: Should it be a comedy, a tragedy or a dogmatic disaster-documentary? The latter is mostly the accepted province of Hollywood, and the only form of tragedy that see...

    by Jim Lillie on January 1, 1998
  • Article

    What a Dog

    Last year 28 of America's regional theaters presented A.R. Gurney's comedy Sylvia, giving it the dubious distinction of being the most-produced play of the professional theater season apart from holiday regulars such as A Christmas Carol. There's an ...

    by Jim Lillie on January 1, 1998
  • Article

    The Fortunes of War

    If things had gone slightly differently on the night of December 22, 1989, the Denver Art Museum's current show Old Masters Brought to Light: European Paintings From the National Museum of Art of Romania would never have happened. Because that night,...

    by Michael Paglia on December 25, 1997
  • Article

    Amen to That

    The violence that engulfed America shortly after the assassinations of Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy is well-documented. What isn't as well known is that many churches responded to the unrest by pulling together in a unique and effecti...

    by Jim Lillie on December 25, 1997
  • Article

    Hayley's Comet

    Suppose you have a few million dollars to invest in The King and I. Naturally, you want to create a touring production of the highest quality, but you're also concerned about turning a profit. What you need is some sort of guarantee that will elimina...

    by Jim Lillie on December 25, 1997
  • Article

    Through the Past, Deftly

    The Colorado History Museum's new exhibit on the 1960s and '70s is filled with contradictions. It's elegant in places, crude elsewhere; there are joyful moments and sad ones. And conveying these contradictions is exactly what the show's principal org...

    by Michael Paglia on December 18, 1997
  • Article

    The Pizza Man Cometh

    No matter how hard playwright Eugene O'Neill tried to distance himself from his anguished past, the personal demons of his family life continued to hound the great writer until his death in 1953. He passed on his obsession to his widow, Carlotta, ins...

    by Jim Lillie on December 18, 1997
  • Article

    The Dead Zone

    The closing moments of CityStage Ensemble's production of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead are ripe for a rendition of "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen." After all, director Dan Hiester bills his production as "[British playwright Tom] Stoppard's co...

    by Jim Lillie on December 18, 1997
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